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820596
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text The Government is committed to helping men and women to balance work and childcare between them. It is good for parents and children, as well as being an important way to address the Gender Pay Gap. Shared Parental Leave and the right to request flexible working enables parents to arrange work and care in a way that works for them. more like this
423856
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <br /><p>I refer The Hon Member for Harrow West to the reply given by Her Majesty’s Treasury to PQ 13524 on 2 November 2015.</p> more like this
1082211
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>100% of employers believed to be in scope of the regulations reported their figures by August 2018.</p><p> </p><p>It is an employer’s legal responsibility to ensure that they report on time and that their figures are accurate. The vast majority of the over 10,500 that reported last year have completed the calculations correctly. In 2018, the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) commenced enforcement action against 100 employers suspected of publishing inaccurate gender pay gap figures.</p><p> </p><p>The EHRC enforcement found that they were a result of errors, rather than a deliberate attempt to mislead. They have worked closely with employers to identify and correct errors - all of whom have now either verified their figures or identified and corrected calculation errors.</p><p> </p><p>Employers have until 30 March, for the public sector, and 4 April, for the private and voluntary sector, to submit their data for the second year. The data for the 2018-19 reporting year will be reviewed once the deadline has passed.</p>
1082213
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>100% of employers believed to be in scope of the regulations reported their figures by August 2018.</p><p> </p><p>It is an employer’s legal responsibility to ensure that they report on time and that their figures are accurate. The vast majority of the over 10,500 that reported last year have completed the calculations correctly. In 2018, the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) commenced enforcement action against 100 employers suspected of publishing inaccurate gender pay gap figures.</p><p> </p><p>The EHRC enforcement found that they were a result of errors, rather than a deliberate attempt to mislead. They have worked closely with employers to identify and correct errors - all of whom have now either verified their figures or identified and corrected calculation errors.</p><p> </p><p>Employers have until 30 March, for the public sector, and 4 April, for the private and voluntary sector, to submit their data for the second year. The data for the 2018-19 reporting year will be reviewed once the deadline has passed.</p>
1082227
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>100% of employers believed to be in scope of the regulations reported their figures by August 2018.</p><p> </p><p>It is an employer’s legal responsibility to ensure that they report on time and that their figures are accurate. The vast majority of the over 10,500 that reported last year have completed the calculations correctly. In 2018, the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) commenced enforcement action against 100 employers suspected of publishing inaccurate gender pay gap figures.</p><p> </p><p>The EHRC enforcement found that they were a result of errors, rather than a deliberate attempt to mislead. They have worked closely with employers to identify and correct errors - all of whom have now either verified their figures or identified and corrected calculation errors.</p><p> </p><p>Employers have until 30 March, for the public sector, and 4 April, for the private and voluntary sector, to submit their data for the second year. The data for the 2018-19 reporting year will be reviewed once the deadline has passed.</p>
1082311
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>100% of employers believed to be in scope of the regulations reported their figures by August 2018.</p><p> </p><p>It is an employer’s legal responsibility to ensure that they report on time and that their figures are accurate. The vast majority of the over 10,500 that reported last year have completed the calculations correctly. In 2018, the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) commenced enforcement action against 100 employers suspected of publishing inaccurate gender pay gap figures.</p><p> </p><p>The EHRC enforcement found that they were a result of errors, rather than a deliberate attempt to mislead. They have worked closely with employers to identify and correct errors - all of whom have now either verified their figures or identified and corrected calculation errors.</p><p> </p><p>Employers have until 30 March, for the public sector, and 4 April, for the private and voluntary sector, to submit their data for the second year. The data for the 2018-19 reporting year will be reviewed once the deadline has passed.</p>
442763
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>35 female and 20 male members of staff currently work in the Government Equalities Office.</p> more like this
856300
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p><br>Following the closure of the Government’s consultation on ‘Caste in Great Britain and Equality Law’ on 18 September 2017, we received 42 late responses in five separate postal mailings. This constituted 0.26% of the total number of responses received, and included responses from both those in favour of and those opposed to explicit legal protection against caste discrimination being included in the Equality Act 2010. Almost all late responses were campaign responses identical to others which had arrived on time.</p><p>Respondents had already had almost six months to reply to the consultation, and late responses were not taken into account in the Government’s analysis of the consultation’s results. The Government will be publishing this analysis and its response to the consultation in due course.</p> more like this
1167413
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p><del class="ministerial">It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Dissolution.</del></p><p><ins class="ministerial">The Government recognises that disabled people are likely to face greater costs when seeking elected office due to their disability. That is why we launched the EnAble Fund for Elected Office to help cover disability related expenses. As an interim fund it gave political parties the time to put in place measures to support disabled candidates.</ins></p><p><ins class="ministerial"> The Fund is time limited and was put in place for elections that had been planned. Therefore, funding has not been scheduled for this election. Retrospective support, as with this year’s European Parliamentary Elections, could be considered for candidates but this would be for the next Government to decide.</ins></p> more like this
652396
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p><del class="ministerial">The Equality and Human Rights Commission is the regulator for the public sector equality duty set out in section 149 of the Equality Act 2010. The Commission uses a range of levers to ensure local authorities and other public bodies comply with the requirements of the duty, from provision of guidance through to enforcement activity where it considers there to be a strategic benefit.</del></p><p><del class="ministerial">In light of the Brighton University report highlighted by the Honourable Member, the Commission will be writing to the Local Government Association (LGA) drawing its attention to the findings of the research and of the Commission’s evidence of the key equality challenges facing lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people, and asking the LGA to remind local authorities of their legal obligations under the public sector equality duty.</del></p><p><ins class="ministerial">We encourage all service providers, including financial services, to provide a welcoming environment for all customers, including transgender and non-binary customers.</ins></p><p><ins class="ministerial">To support this aim, we published ‘Providing services for transgender customers: a guide’ in November 2015 to help service providers ensure transgender people are welcomed, included and valued as customers, clients, users or members, and to ensure they are treated fairly and appropriately. It also aims to help service providers comply with the law.</ins></p><p><ins class="ministerial">We welcome the fact that some banks, such as the Metro Bank, allow customers to select non-binary as a gender option.</ins></p>