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657776
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text The Department for Exiting the European Union (DExEU) has responsibility for overseeing negotiations to leave the EU and establishing the future relationship between the UK and the EU. The Ministry of Justice, which has responsibility for civil law instruments such as the Rome I Regulation, has been working closely with DExEU to consider options for the future relationship between the UK and the EU. We will work to ensure the best outcome for the UK, including its consumers and businesses. more like this
1024226
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>​​Both the Department for Education (DfE) and Office for Students (OfS) were made aware of the decision to defer the planned speech by the Israeli Ambassador. The DfE’s Further Education/Higher Education coordinator has been in contact with the institution.</p><p>​Freedom of speech is a crucial element of higher education and government and OfS are committed to championing it and to promoting open debate and challenge. Universities are autonomous bodies and are responsible for taking their own decisions around how to manage events and mitigate risks; handling of individual cases is not dictated by government or by the OfS. The OfS has powers to intervene if providers are not following their own free speech codes of practice</p> more like this
1024869
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>​Widening participation is a priority for this government. We want to ensure that everyone with the potential to benefit from a university education has the opportunity to do so, regardless of their background or where they grew up. Significant progress has been made in recent years; in 2018, 18-year olds from disadvantaged backgrounds were 52% more likely to enter full-time higher education than in 2009.</p><p> </p><p>However, we have made clear our expectation that the Office for Students (OfS) will challenge universities to make greater progress in widening access and participation.</p><p> </p><p>For example, we have asked the OfS to explore further the use of contextual information in university admissions, such as whether an applicant comes from a low participation neighbourhood or attends a school that does not send many students to university.</p><p> </p><p>​We expect universities to use unconditional offers responsibly. There are cases where the use of unconditional offers can be justified, however the systematic use of unconditional offers is not in the interest of students.</p>
1046297
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>​There is no place for extremism in our society and extremist views should be exposed and challenged.</p><p> </p><p>The Department for Education has not engaged with any institutions, including SOAS University of London, in relation to the Henry Jackson Society report.</p><p> </p><p>The government believes that free speech should been encouraged, provided that it is within the law as it encourages debate and understanding. Challenging extremist speakers and events is an important part of tackling extremist narratives. However, this does not mean closing down lawful speech, but rather ensuring the right steps are taken to counter extremist narratives and make sure that those who wish to spread hatred do not go unchallenged.</p><p> </p><p>The Prevent duty requires higher education institutions to ensure they have mitigated the risk of extremist speakers spreading harmful narratives before an event can go ahead.</p><p> </p><p>​The Equality and Human Rights Commission is developing new guidance on freedom of speech in higher education, which will be published shortly.</p>
1050775
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>​The terms and conditions of repayment of student loans are set out by the Education (Student Loans) (Repayment) Regulations 2009 (as amended). These regulations make provision for repayment for borrowers resident both in the UK and overseas, including the EU.</p><p> </p><p>The Department for Education continues to work closely with the Student Loans Company (SLC) to ensure a robust overseas repayment strategy. The SLC has arrangements in place to collect repayments from borrowers who move away from the UK and establishes a repayment schedule based on the borrower’s income and provides information on the methods of repayment available.</p><p> </p><p>If borrowers based overseas fail to remain in contact with the SLC, the SLC will set up a fixed repayment schedule and place those borrowers in arrears. Borrowers with post-2012 loans who have not remained in contact with the SLC are charged the maximum interest rate of RPI+3% until they get back in touch. Further action, including legal action, can then be taken to secure recovery.</p>
1002480
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>​The department will be consulting on the impact that these costs will impose on all institutions covered by the Teachers’ Pension Scheme, including those in the higher education (HE) sector, and will decide what action should be taken.</p><p>At present, the department proposes to provide funding to schools, including state-funded, non-maintained special schools and independent special schools to cover increased pensions costs to ensure that funding is allocated where it is most needed.</p><p>​This includes proposed funding for those further education (FE) providers obliged to offer the Teachers’ Pension Scheme, consisting of general FE colleges, sixth form colleges, designated institutions (including the new designated institutions that form part of HE institution group structures), specialist post-16 institutions and adult &amp; community learning providers (local authority provision).</p> more like this
775991
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>Young people from disadvantaged backgrounds are entering at record rates to the most selective universities. There are also record entry rates across all ethnic groups.</p><p>The guidance to the Director of Fair Access (DfA), published in February 2016, asked for the most selective institutions, to make faster progress on widening access, and to ensure their outreach is more focused. This report can be found in the attached document.</p><p>The DfA has agreed access agreements for 2018/19 with plans for universities to spend more than £860 million on measures to continue to support improving access and student success for students from disadvantaged and under-represented backgrounds, up significantly from £404 million in 2009. We are introducing sweeping reforms through legislation. The Higher Education and Research Act includes a transparency duty requiring all universities to publish applications, offers, and acceptance and retention rates broken down by gender, ethnicity and social economic background. This will help to hold them to account for their performance on access and retention. In addition, we expect all universities, particularly the most selective, to help raise attainment and support school improvement, including through school sponsorship and by establishing new state schools.</p><p> </p>
1181071
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>Work to identify an export market for the new Type 31 class of frigate is on-going. A General-Purpose Frigate Export Working Group (GPFEWG), with representatives from cross-Government and Industry, has been set up and is responsible for supporting the realisation of Type 31 export opportunities in support of the National Ship Building Strategy (NSBS). The GPFEWG is meeting regularly to agree the export opportunities and the strategy to pursue them.</p> more like this
993826
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>Widening participation is a priority for this government. We want to ensure that everyone with talent and potential to succeed in higher education has the opportunity to do so, regardless of background, ethnicity or where they grew up. Higher education institutions play an important role in achieving this goal through their outreach and widening participation work.</p><p>Government has already made available school level data on pupils eligible for free school meals through the ‘Find and compare schools in England’ service and I encourage universities to make use of this. This is available at: <a href="https://www.compare-school-performance.service.gov.uk/" target="_blank">https://www.compare-school-performance.service.gov.uk/</a>.</p><p>Universities should also continue to work directly with schools and third sector organisations to spot and nurture talent early. I have asked Department for Education officials to look at ways the department can support the sector, to identify talented pupils and to help assist in targeting outreach activity.</p>
1061390
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>Widening access and participation in higher and further education is a priority for this government. Everyone with the capability to succeed should have  the opportunity to benefit from a university education, regardless of their background or where they grew up. On 1 February 2019, we announced measures to tackle ethnic disparities in higher education. The announcement is attached and can also be found at: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/news/universities-must-do-more-to-tackle-ethnic-disparity" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/news/universities-must-do-more-to-tackle-ethnic-disparity</a>.</p><p> </p><p>The new regulator for higher education, the Office for Students (OfS) has a statutory duty in regards to students who share particular characteristics, (protected under the Equality Act 2010), and where there is specific evidence that barriers exist that may prevent equality of opportunity, including those from the Gypsy, Roma and Traveller communities.</p><p> </p><p>Through Access and Participation Plans agreed with the OfS, higher education providers are expected to reduce the gaps in access, success and progression for under-represented groups amongst their students.</p><p> </p><p>Eligible 16 to 19 year olds do not pay tuition fees for post-16 further education (e.g. A Levels and approved technical qualifications). This enables young people to meet the requirement of continuing to participate in education or training beyond the age of 16.</p><p> </p><p>Eligibility to receive public funding for further education for adults (those aged 19 and above), is based on age, prior attainment and a learner’s circumstances. Skills provision is prioritised and focussed towards young adults, those with low skills and unemployed people who are actively seeking work.</p><p> </p><p>In addition, the government also provides financial support to enable learners to participate in post-16 further education, whatever their financial situation. This includes contributions to costs such as transport, childcare, essential books, equipment and accommodation.</p>