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1485371
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>Pension Credit applications and take up have improved dramatically following the Pension Credit awareness campaign in April, and the Pension Credit Day of Action on 15 June; this involved work with broadcasters, media, newspapers and other stakeholder partners who were encouraged to reach out to pensioners to promote Pension Credit through their channels.</p><p> </p><p>Although not all claims can be directly attributed to the campaign, early indications are that the day of action has been highly effective. Our internal management information suggests there have been over 10,000 Pension Credit claims made during the week of the media day – an increase of 275% compared to the same week in 2021, which itself was an enhanced week due to the 2021 Pension Credit Action Day.</p><p> </p><p>The impact of these claim volumes on numbers of successful awards and on Pension Credit take up will take longer to establish given the usual cycle involved in producing those statistics. However, the campaign is ongoing including a particular focus on getting the private sector to drive forward efforts to enhance claims, and specific effort to reach out to communities who have traditionally not claimed Pension Credit. That work is very much ongoing.</p>
1484968
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>The theft of a much-loved pet causes emotional trauma and impacts pet owners and families. The Government launched a Pet Theft Taskforce in May 2021 in response to concerns about a perceived increase in pet theft during COVID restrictions.</p><p>The Pet Theft Taskforce concluded that a new offence of pet abduction would best address concerns that the criminal law is only currently capable of treating the theft of a pet as a theft of property; and also, to recognise the potential impact on their welfare when they are taken by strangers.</p><p>The offence as currently drafted in the Animal Welfare (Kept Animals) Bill focuses on dogs, with enabling powers. The inclusion of the enabling powers means that the Secretary of State will be able to extend the offence to other species of companion animal in the future by making regulations.</p><p>The Animal Welfare (Kept Animals) Bill completed its Commons Committee Stage in November. A carryover motion was passed by the House on 25 April 2022. The Bill will continue its passage as soon as parliamentary time allows.</p>
1484969
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>This Government is determined to crack down on the county lines gangs who exploit our children and have a devastating impact on our communities. That is why, through the ten-year Drugs Strategy, we are investing up to £145m over three years in our successful County Lines Programme. Since November 2019 police activity funded by the County Lines Programme has closed over 2,400 lines, made over 8,000 arrests, and engaged over 9,500 individuals through safeguarding interventions.</p><p>Also, through the County Lines Programme, the Home Office funds the National County Lines Co-ordination Centre (NCLCC) who have identified and are sharing best practice on ‘cuckooing’. Examples include working with local authorities and housing associations to raise awareness, to disrupt this malicious crime and signpost vulnerable victims to support.</p> more like this
1485053
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>Tribunals are independent of the Department and may draw a different conclusion based on the same evidence.</p><p> </p><p>We seek to learn from tribunal outcomes and are continually improving our processes.</p> more like this
1485054
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>The Procurement Bill will deliver a step change in transparency and openness, with notices mandated for direct awards and publication requirements extended from planning to termination, including contract performance.</p><p><strong> </strong></p><p>A single central platform for contract data will give everyone wider access to procurement information, strengthening the new Procurement Review Unit’s ability to investigate concerns around both awards and transparency.</p><p> </p> more like this
1485055
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>In leading his independent Review of the Research, Development and Innovation Organisational Landscape, Sir Paul Nurse has undertaken a detailed evidence gathering process, including gathering input from hundreds of organisations in the UK’s RDI landscape. Work is underway to consider and finalise the Review’s recommendations, which will be presented to my rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy prior to publication.</p> more like this
1485059
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>The sharing economy has brought many benefits to the tourism sector and wider economy, as well as creating an additional income stream for homeowners. However, we recognise that the increase in short-term letting has also prompted some concerns. These include the impact on the housing market and local communities, and a sense that new entrants in the market are not being held to the same health and safety standards as, for example, hotels and B&amp;Bs.</p><p>The Government committed in the Tourism Recovery Plan published in June last year to consult on a possible Short Term Accommodation Registration Scheme in England. A call for evidence as the first stage of that consultation process was published on 29 June and runs until 21 September.</p><p>We want to hear from a wide range of stakeholders, including local authorities, in order to build a much-needed evidence base on these issues and enable us to develop proportionate policy responses. We ideally want to strike a balance between the benefits of the sharing economy and the concerns of the impacts on some communities, alongside ensuring consistency in quality among the range of different tourism accommodation providers.</p>
1485060
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>The sharing economy has brought many benefits to the tourism sector and wider economy, as well as creating an additional income stream for homeowners. However, we recognise that the increase in short-term letting has also prompted some concerns. These include the impact on the housing market and local communities, and a sense that new entrants in the market are not being held to the same health and safety standards as, for example, hotels and B&amp;Bs.</p><p>The Government committed in the Tourism Recovery Plan published in June last year to consult on a possible Short Term Accommodation Registration Scheme in England. A call for evidence as the first stage of that consultation process was published on 29 June and runs until 21 September.</p><p>We want to hear from a wide range of stakeholders, including local authorities, in order to build a much-needed evidence base on these issues and enable us to develop proportionate policy responses. We ideally want to strike a balance between the benefits of the sharing economy and the concerns of the impacts on some communities, alongside ensuring consistency in quality among the range of different tourism accommodation providers.</p>
1485061
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>The sharing economy has brought many benefits to the tourism sector and wider economy, as well as creating an additional income stream for homeowners. However, we recognise that the increase in short-term letting has also prompted some concerns. These include the impact on the housing market and local communities, and a sense that new entrants in the market are not being held to the same health and safety standards as, for example, hotels and B&amp;Bs.</p><p>The Government committed in the Tourism Recovery Plan published in June last year to consult on a possible Short Term Accommodation Registration Scheme in England. A call for evidence as the first stage of that consultation process was published on 29 June and runs until 21 September.</p><p>We want to hear from a wide range of stakeholders, including local authorities, in order to build a much-needed evidence base on these issues and enable us to develop proportionate policy responses. We ideally want to strike a balance between the benefits of the sharing economy and the concerns of the impacts on some communities, alongside ensuring consistency in quality among the range of different tourism accommodation providers.</p>
1485062
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>The sharing economy has brought many benefits to the tourism sector and wider economy, as well as creating an additional income stream for homeowners. However, we recognise that the increase in short-term letting has also prompted some concerns. These include the impact on the housing market and local communities, and a sense that new entrants in the market are not being held to the same health and safety standards as, for example, hotels and B&amp;Bs.</p><p>The Government committed in the Tourism Recovery Plan published in June last year to consult on a possible Short Term Accommodation Registration Scheme in England. A call for evidence as the first stage of that consultation process was published on 29 June and runs until 21 September.</p><p>We want to hear from a wide range of stakeholders, including local authorities, in order to build a much-needed evidence base on these issues and enable us to develop proportionate policy responses. We ideally want to strike a balance between the benefits of the sharing economy and the concerns of the impacts on some communities, alongside ensuring consistency in quality among the range of different tourism accommodation providers.</p>