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755777
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-09-04more like thismore than 2017-09-04
star this property answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept id 13 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs remove filter
star this property hansard heading Wood-burning Stoves: Greenhouse Gas Emissions more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate the Government has made of the change in the level of harmful emissions, such as PM2.5, as a result of more people using wood-burning stoves and chimneys in each of the last three years. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Chesterfield more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Toby Perkins remove filter
star this property uin 7396 remove filter
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-09-12more like thismore than 2017-09-12
star this property answer text <p>Our most recent assessment shows that domestic solid fuel burning contributed 40% (42 kilotonnes) of total PM<sub>2.5</sub> emissions in the UK during 2015, with domestic wood burning alone accounting for 35% (37 kilotonnes). This compares with 39 kilotonnes (solid fuels) and 33 kilotonnes (wood) in 2014 and 45 kilotonnes (solid fuels) and 40 kilotonnes (wood) in 2013.</p><p>Evidence shows that particulate matter (PM) of 2.5 microns in diameter (PM<sub>2.5</sub>) and smaller can have detrimental effects on health. Small particles from smoke which are formed when wood is burned can get into the lungs and blood and be transported around the body, where they have a variety of detrimental health effects. It is, however, difficult to assess the increase in risk to public health that is associated with domestic wood burning alone.</p> more like this
unstar this property answering member constituency Suffolk Coastal more like this
star this property answering member printed Dr Thérèse Coffey more like this
star this property grouped question UIN 7481 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-09-12T12:56:49.103Zmore like thismore than 2017-09-12T12:56:49.103Z
star this property answering member
4098
star this property label Biography information for Dr Thérèse Coffey more like this
star this property tabling member
3952
star this property label Biography information for Toby Perkins more like this