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1144453
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-09-03more like thismore than 2019-09-03
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Sentencing more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, in what proportion of adjudications additional days were added to a prisoner's sentence; how many days were added and for what reasons, in each year since 2010. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Shipley more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Philip Davies remove filter
star this property uin 286166 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-09-09more like thismore than 2019-09-09
star this property answer text <p>The prisoner discipline system upholds justice in prisons and ensures incidents of prisoner rule-breaking have consequences. In cases which the prison governor deems the rule-breaking to be sufficiently serious an Independent Adjudicator, appointed by the Chief Magistrate, can attend a prison to award additional days to the prisoner’s custodial time left to serve.</p><p> </p><p>Information on the number of occasions on which additional days were awarded to prisoners by offence is publicly available at:</p><p><a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/offender-management-statistics-quarterly" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/offender-management-statistics-quarterly</a></p><p> </p><p>For ease, both the number of awards and the number of days that were added to a prisoner’s custodial time, in each year since 2011 is shown in the table below. The information requested for 2010 is not provided due to data quality issues:</p><p> </p><p><strong>The Number</strong> <strong>of awards where additional days were given and total number of days of additional days, 2011 – 2018, England and Wales Can be found in the attached Table.</strong></p>
star this property answering member constituency South East Cambridgeshire remove filter
unstar this property answering member printed Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-09-09T11:14:58.92Zmore like thismore than 2019-09-09T11:14:58.92Z
star this property answering member
4517
star this property label Biography information for Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property attachment
1
star this property file name Table Phillip Davies.png more like this
star this property title Table more like this
star this property tabling member
1565
unstar this property label Biography information for Philip Davies more like this
1144454
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-09-03more like thismore than 2019-09-03
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Prisons: Crimes of Violence more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of assaults on prison staff resulted in a criminal conviction in each of the last five years. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Shipley more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Philip Davies remove filter
star this property uin 286167 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-09-09more like thismore than 2019-09-09
star this property answer text <p>It is not possible to identify the proportion of assaults on prison staff that resulted in a criminal conviction in each of the last five years. Detailed information may be held on court record but to be able to identify these cases we would have to access individual court records which would be of disproportionate cost.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency South East Cambridgeshire remove filter
unstar this property answering member printed Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-09-09T11:39:24.243Zmore like thismore than 2019-09-09T11:39:24.243Z
star this property answering member
4517
star this property label Biography information for Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property tabling member
1565
unstar this property label Biography information for Philip Davies more like this
1139202
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-07-16more like thismore than 2019-07-16
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Prisons: Drugs more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent assessment he has made of the effect of prisoners being released on temporary licence on the supply of drugs into prisons. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Shipley more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Philip Davies remove filter
star this property uin 277693 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-07-31more like thismore than 2019-07-31
star this property answer text <p>We do not hold data centrally on what proportion of prisoners released on temporary licence supply drugs into prisons.</p><p> </p><p>By providing opportunities to work, learn and build family ties, temporary release from prison helps ensure offenders do not return to crime when they leave prison. We recognise that temporary release presents a potential route by which drugs might enter a prison and this is a key consideration in how the establishment operates its release on temporary licence (ROTL) regime. All offenders released on ROTL are subject to rigorous individual risk assessment and licence conditions. Returning with drugs is both a criminal offence and a breach of the licence conditions, which can lead to suspension of ROTL and a return to closed prison conditions, in addition to any other penalty.</p><p> </p><p>Evidence shows the vast majority abide by their temporary release conditions, with the compliance rate standing at well over 99%. Non-compliance is, and will continue to be, dealt with robustly.</p><p> </p><p>To respond to the risk from drugs in prisons, we are strengthening our gate and perimeter security, drafting specialist search teams into prisons across the country and investing in physical and technical security counter measures. Alongside this, Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) has developed a new, national Prison Drugs Strategy, published in April 2019. The Strategy outlines how HMPPS is working to restrict the supply of drugs, reduce demand through rehabilitative activities, and support prisoners to build recovery from substance misuse.</p>
star this property answering member constituency South East Cambridgeshire remove filter
unstar this property answering member printed Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-07-31T14:50:45.8Zmore like thismore than 2019-07-31T14:50:45.8Z
star this property answering member
4517
star this property label Biography information for Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property tabling member
1565
unstar this property label Biography information for Philip Davies more like this
1122851
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-04-24more like thismore than 2019-04-24
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Reoffenders more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 10 April to Question 239207 on Reoffenders: Community Orders, how many offences of each type were committed by those offenders. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Shipley more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Philip Davies remove filter
star this property uin 246971 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-05-09more like thismore than 2019-05-09
star this property answer text <p>The number of reoffences for each reoffence type committed by offenders who had started a community order in January to December 2016 and reoffended can be found in the attached table.</p><p> </p><p>The time period covered is the calendar year rather than the financial year as was previously provided in response to Question 239207.</p><p> </p><p>There is persuasive evidence showing community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective than short custodial sentences in reducing reoffending. The MoJ study ‘The impact of short custodial sentences, community orders and suspended sentence orders on re-offending’ published in 2015 involved around 350,000 sentencing occasions over 4 years and used 130 different variables to construct matched groups of offenders and examine the effect of short sentences relative to community sentences. This study found a reduction of around 3 percentage points in proven reoffences if offenders receiving sentences of less than 12 months were to get a community order instead. This is statistically significant and equates to around 30,000 proven reoffences in total over a one-year period. This means fewer victims of crime.</p><p> </p><p>Unless we tackle the underlying causes of offending, we cannot protect the public from being victims of crime. Effective community orders can address offenders’ behaviour, answer their mental health and alcohol or drug misuse needs, and provide reparation for the benefit of the wider community.</p>
star this property answering member constituency South East Cambridgeshire remove filter
unstar this property answering member printed Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-09T17:06:01.1Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-09T17:06:01.1Z
star this property answering member
4517
star this property label Biography information for Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property attachment
1
star this property file name Copy of PQ 246971 table.xlsx more like this
star this property title Table more like this
star this property tabling member
1565
unstar this property label Biography information for Philip Davies more like this
1122854
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-04-24more like thismore than 2019-04-24
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Community Orders more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 19 March 2019 to Question 230697 on prison sentences, how many community orders each of those offenders had previously been given before being sent to prison. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Shipley more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Philip Davies remove filter
star this property uin 246974 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-05-09more like thismore than 2019-05-09
star this property answer text <p>The Answer of 19 March 2019 to Question 230697 provided data, broken down by males and females, on the highest number of previous offences committed by an offender who received their first immediate custodial sentences between year ending September 2014 and year ending September 2018. Pursuant to this answer data on how many community orders each of those offenders had previously been given before being sent to prison can be viewed in the table.</p><p>This analysis relates to a small number of offenders and so the information provided can be volatile and change significantly depending on the offender selected for each year. It should be noted that figures looking at the highest number of previous offences or disposal types are not representative of the majority of the offending population.</p><p>Sentencing is a matter for our independent courts, who take into account all the circumstances of the case, including any aggravating and mitigating factors. We are clear that sentencing must match the severity of a crime.</p><p>However, sentences should also rehabilitate. There is persuasive evidence showing community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective than short custodial sentences in reducing reoffending. The MoJ study ‘The impact of short custodial sentences, community orders and suspended sentence orders on re-offending’ published in 2015 involved around 350,000 sentencing occasions over 4 years and used 130 different variables to construct matched groups of offenders and examine the effect of short sentences relative to community sentences. This study found a reduction of around 3 percentage points in proven reoffences if offenders receiving sentences of less than 12 months were to get a community order instead. This is statistically significant and equates to around 30,000 proven reoffences in total over a one-year period. This means fewer victims of crime.</p><p>Unless we tackle the underlying causes of offending, we cannot protect the public from being victims of crime. Effective community orders can address offenders’ behaviour, answer their mental health and alcohol or drug misuse needs, and provide reparation for the benefit of the wider community.</p>
star this property answering member constituency South East Cambridgeshire remove filter
unstar this property answering member printed Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-09T17:11:10.517Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-09T17:11:10.517Z
star this property answering member
4517
star this property label Biography information for Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property attachment
1
star this property file name PQ246974 - Response Table.xlsx more like this
star this property title PQ246974 - Response Table more like this
star this property tabling member
1565
unstar this property label Biography information for Philip Davies more like this
1122853
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-04-24more like thismore than 2019-04-24
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Community Orders more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what plans he has to introduce tougher community sentences. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Shipley more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Philip Davies remove filter
star this property uin 246973 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-05-03more like thismore than 2019-05-03
star this property answer text <p>The sentencing framework already gives courts the flexibility to select community order requirements which are a robust alternative to custody, and are tailored to address the specific issues that contribute to reoffending. Community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective in reducing reoffending, and therefore keeping the public safe. We must ensure the public and judiciary have confidence in effective community orders, including those which address offenders’ behaviour, answer their mental health and substance misuse needs and provide reparation for the benefit of the wider community.</p><p> </p><p>We are rolling out GPS enabled location monitoring in addition to the existing curfew monitoring technology, which will provide the courts with an additional option when imposing community sentences.</p><p> </p><p>Some requirements aim to reduce reoffending by addressing the issues that contribute to the underlying causes of offending. We are working with the Department of Health and Social Care, NHS England and Public Health England, in addition to the relevant local authorities, on protocol to support the greater use of community sentences with treatment requirements in courts in five testbed sites across the UK. The Community Sentence Treatment Requirement protocol sets out what is expected from all relevant agencies to ensure improved access to treatment for offenders who need it</p><p> </p><p>We are taking action to improve probation delivery and enforcement of community requirements. We recently consulted on a range of reforms to probation and we will set out detailed plans shortly. As part of those reforms we want to make sure that judges and magistrates get the right information on what probation services are available locally.</p>
star this property answering member constituency South East Cambridgeshire remove filter
unstar this property answering member printed Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-03T13:45:20.597Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-03T13:45:20.597Z
star this property answering member
4517
star this property label Biography information for Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property tabling member
1565
unstar this property label Biography information for Philip Davies more like this
1122855
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-04-24more like thismore than 2019-04-24
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Community Orders more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 19 March 2019 to Questions 230698-230707 and 231412-231416 on prison sentences, how many community orders each of those offenders had previously been given before being sent to prison. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Shipley more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Philip Davies remove filter
star this property uin 246975 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-05-03more like thismore than 2019-05-03
star this property answer text <p>The Answer of 19 March 2019 to Questions 230698-230707 and 231412-231416 was on the highest number of previous offences committed, for different offence items, before being given an immediate custodial sentence in each of the last three years. Pursuant to this, the answer regarding how many community orders each of those offenders had previously been given before being sent to prison can be found in the table attached. As benefit fraud offences are not prosecuted by the police, it is not possible to answer Question 230707.</p><p>Sentencing is a matter for our independent courts, who take into account all circumstances of the case, including any aggravating and mitigating factors. We are clear that sentencing must match the severity of a crime.</p><p>However, sentences should also rehabilitate. There is persuasive evidence showing community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective than short custodial sentences in reducing reoffending. The MoJ study ‘The impact of short custodial sentences, community orders and suspended sentence orders on re-offending’ published in 2015 involved around 350,000 sentencing occasions over 4 years and used 130 different variables to construct matched groups of offenders and examine the effect of short sentences relative to community sentences. This study found a reduction of around 3 percentage points in proven reoffences if offenders receiving sentences of less than 12 months were to get a community order instead. This is statistically significant and equates to around 30,000 proven reoffences in total over a one-year period. This means fewer victims of crime.</p><p>Unless we tackle the underlying causes of offending, we cannot protect the public from being victims of crime. Effective community orders can address offenders’ behaviour, answer their mental health and alcohol or drug misuse needs, and provide reparation for the benefit of the wider community.</p>
star this property answering member constituency South East Cambridgeshire remove filter
unstar this property answering member printed Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-03T13:52:16.37Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-03T13:52:16.37Z
star this property answering member
4517
star this property label Biography information for Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property attachment
1
star this property file name Copy of 20190426 - PQ246975 - Response Table.xlsx more like this
star this property title Table more like this
star this property tabling member
1565
unstar this property label Biography information for Philip Davies more like this
1122856
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-04-24more like thismore than 2019-04-24
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Community Orders more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of steps taken to tackle breaches and non-compliance of community orders. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Shipley more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Philip Davies remove filter
star this property uin 246976 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-05-03more like thismore than 2019-05-03
star this property answer text <p>Protection of the public is our key priority. This includes taking effective action to ensure that court orders are properly enforced. In the event of two unreasonable failures to comply with the requirements of a community order or suspended sentence order, Probation Instruction 06/2014 (Enforcement of Community Orders and Suspended Sentence Orders) requires both the National Probation Service and the Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) to return the offender to court. Where offenders are not complying with their sentences, probation providers must take swift and robust action, with offenders returned to court for breach proceedings where appropriate.</p><p> </p><p>We have robust systems in place to manage the effectiveness of our enforcement practices. NPS managers are required to monitor the timely enforcement of cases and to take appropriate action when necessary. Our contract management team closely monitors CRCs to make sure they fulfil their contractual commitments to maintain service delivery, reduce re-offending, protect the public and provide value for money to taxpayers. This includes enforcing orders where offenders fail to comply. Our internal assurance mechanisms are reviewed regularly to ensure there is adequate oversight of probation performance.</p>
star this property answering member constituency South East Cambridgeshire remove filter
unstar this property answering member printed Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
246977 more like this
246979 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-03T12:41:38.007Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-03T12:41:38.007Z
star this property answering member
4517
star this property label Biography information for Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property tabling member
1565
unstar this property label Biography information for Philip Davies more like this
1122857
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-04-24more like thismore than 2019-04-24
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Community Orders more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he has taken to ensure offenders who breach their community orders are returned to court to face breach proceedings. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Shipley more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Philip Davies remove filter
star this property uin 246977 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-05-03more like thismore than 2019-05-03
star this property answer text <p>Protection of the public is our key priority. This includes taking effective action to ensure that court orders are properly enforced. In the event of two unreasonable failures to comply with the requirements of a community order or suspended sentence order, Probation Instruction 06/2014 (Enforcement of Community Orders and Suspended Sentence Orders) requires both the National Probation Service and the Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) to return the offender to court. Where offenders are not complying with their sentences, probation providers must take swift and robust action, with offenders returned to court for breach proceedings where appropriate.</p><p> </p><p>We have robust systems in place to manage the effectiveness of our enforcement practices. NPS managers are required to monitor the timely enforcement of cases and to take appropriate action when necessary. Our contract management team closely monitors CRCs to make sure they fulfil their contractual commitments to maintain service delivery, reduce re-offending, protect the public and provide value for money to taxpayers. This includes enforcing orders where offenders fail to comply. Our internal assurance mechanisms are reviewed regularly to ensure there is adequate oversight of probation performance.</p>
star this property answering member constituency South East Cambridgeshire remove filter
unstar this property answering member printed Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
246976 more like this
246979 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-03T12:41:38.07Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-03T12:41:38.07Z
star this property answering member
4517
star this property label Biography information for Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property tabling member
1565
unstar this property label Biography information for Philip Davies more like this
1122858
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-04-24more like thismore than 2019-04-24
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Community Orders more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of offenders who were given a community order in each of the last three years breached their order and (a) the order was allowed to continue, (b) were re-sentenced to immediate custody, (c) were re-sentenced to a suspended sentence and (d) were re-sentenced to a different disposal. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Shipley more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Philip Davies remove filter
star this property uin 246978 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-05-03more like thismore than 2019-05-03
star this property answer text <p>The number and proportion of offenders who were given a community order in each of the last three years who breached their order and (a) the order was allowed to continue, (b) were re-sentenced to immediate custody, (c) were re-sentenced to a suspended sentence and (d) were re-sentenced to a new community order can be found in the table attached.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency South East Cambridgeshire remove filter
unstar this property answering member printed Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-03T13:50:32.643Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-03T13:50:32.643Z
star this property answering member
4517
star this property label Biography information for Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property attachment
1
star this property file name Copy of PQ 246978 response table Breach.xlsx more like this
star this property title Table more like this
star this property tabling member
1565
unstar this property label Biography information for Philip Davies more like this