Linked Data API

Show Search Form

Search Results

79716
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Department of Health more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Health more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Lasers more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government what action they propose to take in respect of the import, mainly through the internet, of laser pointers above classes 1 and 2, in the light of the study "‘Toy’ Laser Macular Burns in Children", published in <i>Eye, </i>the scientific journal of the Royal College of Ophthalmologists, in January; and what assessment they have made of the impact of such lasers being pointed at aircraft pilots, train drivers and motorists. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Brabazon of Tara remove filter
star this property uin HL1608 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2014-08-18more like thismore than 2014-08-18
star this property answer text <p>Public Health England (PHE) and its predecessor organisations first issued advice on these matters to the then Department for Trade and Industry in October 1997 suggesting that laser products on general sale to the public should be limited to Class 1 or Class 2. This advice is still relevant. Trading Standards Officers use existing powers under the General Product Safety Regulations to take enforcement action against traders in the United Kingdom supplying high-power laser products, which are usually Class 3B or Class 4.</p><p> </p><p>Following the publication of the paper in the journal Eye, PHE organised a workshop on 20 June 2014. This brought together two of the authors of the paper and stakeholders from across Government, the police and experts on the health implications of exposure to laser beams. PHE agrees with the journal article that it is important parents are aware of the risks of laser products to their children. It was felt that the most appropriate course of action was a campaign to increase awareness of the risks associated with the use of these lasers, including the likelihood that the power in the laser beam could be significantly higher than stated. PHE is now preparing additional material to inform the public.</p><p> </p><p>The ability to impair the vision of a pilot or a vehicle driver depends on the colour of the laser beam, the ambient light conditions and the task being undertaken. Although Class 1 or Class 2 lasers are unlikely to impair the vision of a pilot, under specific conditions, they can cause distraction, glare and afterimages to drivers targeted at close range. Therefore, any inappropriate use of a laser, irrespective of the laser classification, should be taken seriously.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Earl Howe more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-08-18T10:15:45.471458Zmore like thismore than 2014-08-18T10:15:45.471458Z
star this property answering member
2000
star this property label Biography information for Earl Howe more like this
star this property tabling member
3493
star this property label Biography information for Lord Brabazon of Tara more like this