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1051290
unstar this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-01-30more like thismore than 2019-01-30
star this property answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept id 13 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Animal Welfare more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of introducing a ban on tethering animals in unsafe locations including (a) roundabouts (b) roadsides and (c) other public land. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency York Outer more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Julian Sturdy remove filter
star this property uin 214548 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
star this property answer text <p>Defra is keen to ensure that we uphold our high standards of animal welfare including in relation to tethering. Under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 (the 2006 Act) it is an offence to fail to provide for an animal’s welfare or to cause it any unnecessary suffering. The 2006 Act is backed up by the statutory Code of Practice for the Welfare of Horses, Ponies, Donkeys and Their Hybrids (the Code). The Code provides owners and keepers with information on how to meet the welfare needs of their animals and includes a specific section on how to tether a horse and other animals are covered. The code makes it clear that the site should not allow animals’ access to a public highway or public footpaths. If anyone is concerned about the way a horse or other animal has been tethered they should report the matter either to the relevant local authority or to the RSPCA or World Horse Welfare who can investigate. If a horse or other animal is found not to be tethered appropriately it could lead to a prosecution under the 2006 Act. Defra considers that this legislation and guidance provides the right safeguards in respect of tethering.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Macclesfield more like this
star this property answering member printed David Rutley more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-02-07T17:31:45.867Zmore like thismore than 2019-02-07T17:31:45.867Z
star this property answering member
4033
star this property label Biography information for David Rutley more like this
star this property tabling member
4079
unstar this property label Biography information for Julian Sturdy more like this