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1143504
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-09-02more like thismore than 2019-09-02
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading Universal Credit remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment her Department has made of the effect of reduced allowances for universal credit claimants who are under 25 years old on the financial wellbeing of those claimants. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Barnsley Central more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Dan Jarvis remove filter
star this property uin 285284 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-09-05more like thismore than 2019-09-05
star this property answer text <p>The lower standard allowance rates for Universal Credit claimants who are under the age of 25 years reflects that they are more likely to live in someone else's household, have lower living costs, and have lower earnings expectations. It also reinforces the stronger work incentives that Universal Credit creates for this age group. Qualifying claimants can also receive separate elements to provide support for housing costs, children and childcare costs and support for disabled people and carers.</p><p> </p><p>People claiming Universal Credit move into work faster, stay in work longer and spend more time looking to increase their earnings. It provides more financial help with childcare costs (eligible claimants are able to claim up to 85 per cent of their childcare costs, compared to 70% on the legacy system), a dedicated Work Coach, and removes the 16-hour ‘cliff edge’ for those who are working.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Colchester more like this
star this property answering member printed Will Quince more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-09-05T14:53:59.09Zmore like thismore than 2019-09-05T14:53:59.09Z
unstar this property answering member
4423
star this property label Biography information for Will Quince more like this
star this property tabling member
4243
unstar this property label Biography information for Dan Jarvis more like this
1148774
star this property registered interest true more like this
star this property date less than 2019-10-14more like thismore than 2019-10-14
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading Universal Credit remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether she plans to permit Universal Credit claimants to backdate a claim due to ill health in circumstances where medical evidence is provided by a GP. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Barnsley Central more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Dan Jarvis remove filter
star this property uin 168 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-10-18more like thismore than 2019-10-18
star this property answer text <p>Universal Credit claims may be backdated, by up to one calendar month, in some circumstances for vulnerable claimants who may be delayed in claiming Universal Credit through no fault of their own. More specifically, in cases where medical evidence satisfies the Department that a claimant had an illness that prevented them from making a claim sooner, Universal Credit can be awarded from an earlier date.</p><p> </p><p>In order to provide the best possible support to our claimants it is important that the Department are able to engage with claimants at the earliest possible opportunity, whether to support them back into work or to provide other support and guidance. It is therefore important that backdating provisions are used in specific circumstances, and that all claimants are encouraged to contact us at the earliest opportunity.</p><p><strong> </strong></p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency North Swindon more like this
star this property answering member printed Justin Tomlinson more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-10-18T11:06:26.213Zmore like thismore than 2019-10-18T11:06:26.213Z
unstar this property answering member
4105
star this property label Biography information for Justin Tomlinson more like this
star this property tabling member
4243
unstar this property label Biography information for Dan Jarvis more like this
1000260
star this property registered interest true more like this
star this property date less than 2018-11-02more like thismore than 2018-11-02
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading Universal Credit remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, for what reason the taper that is applied to wages is not applied to pensions in relation to universal credit. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Barnsley Central more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Dan Jarvis remove filter
star this property uin 187333 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2018-11-12more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answer text <p>The taper is the rate at which Universal Credit is reduced to take account of earnings. It is specifically for in work claimants and linked to earnings to incentivise work, and those in work to earn more. Universal Credit has a single taper of 63 per cent so payments reduce in a transparent and predictable way as earnings increase. Universal Credit is a means tested benefit, and income other than earnings, such as pensions, is taken fully into account in the assessment of Universal Credit. This is consistent with how legacy means tested benefits such as Employment and Support Allowance, Jobseeker’s Allowance and Income Support treat pension income. Therefore it would not be consistent to extend the earnings taper to pensions income and doing so would also undermine the incentives to work for people of working age.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Reading West more like this
star this property answering member printed Alok Sharma more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2018-11-12T18:05:06.27Zmore like thismore than 2018-11-12T18:05:06.27Z
unstar this property answering member
4014
star this property label Biography information for Alok Sharma more like this
star this property tabling member
4243
unstar this property label Biography information for Dan Jarvis more like this