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1126732
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-14more like thismore than 2019-05-14
star this property answering body
Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 53 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Cabinet Office more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Political Parties: Finance more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the Electoral Commission about putting in place safeguards to ensure that political parties do not receive donations from people promoting the interests of other countries during and between election campaigns. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Tonge remove filter
star this property uin HL15749 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-05-16more like thismore than 2019-05-16
star this property answer text <p>The Electoral Commission in its 2018 report ‘Digital campaigning - Increasing transparency for voters’, included recommendations relating to foreign donations and campaigning. The Government has discussed these with the Electoral Commission.</p><p>On 5th May 2019, the Government announced it will consult on safeguarding UK elections. The consultation may consider recommendations for increasing transparency on digital political advertising, including by third parties; closing loopholes on foreign spending in elections; preventing shell companies from sidestepping the current rules on political finance and on action to tackle foreign lobbying.</p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-16T16:09:24.067Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-16T16:09:24.067Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
200
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Tonge more like this
1109306
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-04-02more like thismore than 2019-04-02
star this property answering body
Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 53 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Cabinet Office more like this
unstar this property hansard heading General Elections: Candidates more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government whether UK parliamentary candidates are permitted to sign a pledge to another nation. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Tonge remove filter
star this property uin HL15023 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-04-11more like thismore than 2019-04-11
star this property answer text <p>Candidates at UK parliamentary elections must comply with the requirements for standing as a candidate at these elections. Otherwise, candidates enjoy the same freedom of expression as applicable to all citizens.</p><p> </p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-04-11T16:05:16.407Zmore like thismore than 2019-04-11T16:05:16.407Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
200
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Tonge more like this
980168
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2018-10-01more like thismore than 2018-10-01
star this property answering body
Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 53 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Cabinet Office more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Developing Countries: Health Services more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the actual UK Official Development Assistance expenditure on sexual and reproductive health and rights from (1) the cross-government funds, (2) the Conflict Stability and Security Fund, and (3) the Prosperity Fund. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Tonge remove filter
star this property uin HL10437 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2018-10-11more like thismore than 2018-10-11
star this property answer text <p>The Conflict, Stability and Security Fund (CSSF) and the Prosperity Fund are both cross-Government funds. Neither has programmes specifically supporting sexual and reproductive health and rights. The CSSF’s portfolio includes programmes which seek to prevent sexual violence in conflict situations and which empower women to seek justice. The Prosperity Fund portfolio will include programmes in the health sector.</p><p> </p><p>More broadly, all ODA funded CSSF and Prosperity Fund programmes must comply with the 2014 International Development (Gender Equality) Act. This means integrating activities which are likely to contribute to reducing gender inequality.</p><p> </p><p>More information on the CSSF, including details on spend broken down by theme, can be found in the <a href="https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/727383/CSSF_Annual_Report_2017_to_2018.pdf" target="_blank">CSSF annual report</a>. Information on the Prosperity Fund can be found in its <a href="https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/670103/FCO-Prosperity-Report-2016-2017.pdf" target="_blank">2016/17 annual report</a>, with updated information available in the next annual report, due later this year.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2018-10-11T11:12:31.007Zmore like thismore than 2018-10-11T11:12:31.007Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
200
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Tonge more like this
980169
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2018-10-01more like thismore than 2018-10-01
star this property answering body
Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 53 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Cabinet Office more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Developing Countries: Health Services more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what percentage of UK Official Development Assistance expenditure on sexual and reproductive health and rights comes from (1) the cross-government funds, (2) the Conflict Stability and Security Fund, and (3) the Prosperity Fund. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Tonge remove filter
star this property uin HL10438 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2018-10-17more like thismore than 2018-10-17
star this property answer text <p>The Conflict, Stability and Security Fund (CSSF) and the Prosperity Fund are both cross-Government funds. Neither has programmes specifically supporting sexual and reproductive health and rights. The CSSF’s portfolio includes programmes which seek to prevent sexual violence in conflict situations and which empower women to seek justice. The Prosperity Fund portfolio will include programmes in the health sector.</p><p> </p><p>More broadly, all ODA funded CSSF and Prosperity Fund programmes must comply with the 2014 International Development (Gender Equality) Act. This means integrating activities which are likely to contribute to reducing gender inequality.</p><p> </p><p>More information on the CSSF, including details on spend broken down by theme, can be found in the <a href="https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/727383/CSSF_Annual_Report_2017_to_2018.pdf" target="_blank">CSSF annual report</a>. Information on the Prosperity Fund can be found in its <a href="https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/670103/FCO-Prosperity-Report-2016-2017.pdf" target="_blank">2016/17 annual report</a>, with updated information available in the next annual report, due later this year.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2018-10-17T13:37:04.97Zmore like thismore than 2018-10-17T13:37:04.97Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
200
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Tonge more like this
980170
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2018-10-01more like thismore than 2018-10-01
star this property answering body
Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 53 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Cabinet Office more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Developing Countries: Health Services more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Bates on 10 September (HL10037), whether the spend on sexual and reproductive health and rights includes funding from the Conflict Stability and Security Fund, and the Prosperity Fund. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Tonge remove filter
star this property uin HL10439 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2018-10-17more like thismore than 2018-10-17
star this property answer text <p>The Conflict, Stability and Security Fund (CSSF) and the Prosperity Fund are both cross-Government funds. Neither has programmes specifically supporting sexual and reproductive health and rights. The CSSF’s portfolio includes programmes which seek to prevent sexual violence in conflict situations and which empower women to seek justice. The Prosperity Fund portfolio will include programmes in the health sector.</p><p> </p><p>More broadly, all ODA funded CSSF and Prosperity Fund programmes must comply with the 2014 International Development (Gender Equality) Act. This means integrating activities which are likely to contribute to reducing gender inequality.</p><p> </p><p>More information on the CSSF, including details on spend broken down by theme, can be found in the <a href="https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/727383/CSSF_Annual_Report_2017_to_2018.pdf" target="_blank">CSSF annual report</a>. Information on the Prosperity Fund can be found in its <a href="https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/670103/FCO-Prosperity-Report-2016-2017.pdf" target="_blank">2016/17 annual report</a>, with updated information available in the next annual report, due later this year.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2018-10-17T13:37:10.477Zmore like thismore than 2018-10-17T13:37:10.477Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
200
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Tonge more like this
852486
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2018-02-28more like thismore than 2018-02-28
star this property answering body
Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 53 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Cabinet Office more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Neonatal Mortality more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the incidence of neonatal mortality and morbidity has decreased over the past five years. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Tonge remove filter
star this property uin HL5969 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2018-03-14more like thismore than 2018-03-14
star this property answer text <p><strong><strong>​</strong></strong></p><p>The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.</p><p><em><strong>Letter from John Pullinger CB, National Statistician, to Baroness Tonge, dated 07 March 2018</strong></em></p><p>Dear Baroness Tonge,</p><p>As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am replying to your Parliamentary Questions asking (a) whether the incidence of neonatal mortality and morbidity has decreased over the past five years (HL5969); (b) what was the incidence of neonatal mortality and morbidity in (1) 2000–05, (2) 2005–10, and (3) 2010–15 (HL5970); and (c) what was the incidence of neonatal mortality and morbidity in (1) 2014–15, (2) 2015–16, and (3) 2016–17 (HL5971).</p><p>The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is responsible for publishing statistics on deaths registered in England and Wales. Statistics on deaths are normally published using calendar years. Neonatal mortality figures are available for both the year the death was registered and the year the death occurred. Comparisons over time are more meaningful using death occurrences, to allow for delays in registering deaths. The latest year for which death occurrence figures are available is 2015 [see note 1 below]. The neonatal mortality figures for 2016 will be published on 14 March 2018 and the data for 2017 will be published in early 2019.</p><p>Table 1 below provides the number of neonatal deaths and the neonatal mortality rates per 1,000 live births for England and Wales, for each calendar year from 2000 to 2015.</p><p>Because the number of neonatal deaths each year is relatively small, there is likely to be some random fluctuation, and no single year since 2000 shows a statistically significant change from the preceding year. However, there has been a generally downward trend throughout the period. In the five years 2011-15, the lowest neonatal mortality rate was in 2014, and this was significantly lower than in 2011 and all previous years. The rate in 2015 was higher than in 2014, but is still significantly lower than in 2011 (taking into account rounding of the figures to one decimal place).</p><p>NHS Digital is responsible for publishing statistics on NHS patient care in England. There is no widely accepted measure of neonatal morbidity, however trends in the admission of neonates to hospital may be useful information. Therefore, figures based on Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) have been given here.</p><p>Table 2 below provides the number of neonatal finished consultant episodes (FCEs) and corresponding neonatal hospitalisation rate per 1,000 live births for England, for each financial year from 2000-01 to 2016-17, and the five-year periods 2001-02 to 2004-05, 2005-06 to 2009-10, and 2010-11 to 2014-15. Note that HES data include activity ending in the year in question and run from April to March, e.g. 2012-13 includes activity ending between 1st April 2012 and 31st March 2013.</p><p>Changes to the HES figures over time need to be interpreted in the context of improvements in data quality and coverage (particularly in earlier years), improvements in coverage of independent sector activity (particularly from 2006-07) and changes in NHS practice. For example, apparent reductions in activity may be due to a number of procedures which may now be undertaken in outpatient settings and so no longer include in admitted patient HES data. Conversely, apparent increases in activity may be due to improved recording of diagnosis or procedure information.</p><p>There has been year on year fluctuation in the number and rate of hospital episodes for neonates over the period of interest, but with a clear overall upward trend. The hospitalisation rate in 2015-16 was significantly higher than five years before. However, as noted above, it is likely that the trend is influenced to some extent by factors such as changing clinical practice and recording.</p><p>Yours sincerely,</p><p>John Pullinger</p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Note 1:</p><p><a href="https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/datasets/childmortalitystatisticschildhoodinfantandperinatalchildhoodinfantandperinatalmortalityinenglandandwales" target="_blank">https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/datasets/childmortalitystatisticschildhoodinfantandperinatalchildhoodinfantandperinatalmortalityinenglandandwales</a></p><p> </p><p>Table 1: Neonatal deaths occurring in England and Wales, numbers and rates, 2000 to 2015</p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p>Year</p></td><td><p>Neonatal deaths</p></td><td><p>Neonatal mortality rate</p></td><td><p>Lower confidence limit</p></td><td><p>Upper confidence limit</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2000</p></td><td><p>2,335</p></td><td><p>3.9</p></td><td><p>3.7</p></td><td><p>4.0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2001</p></td><td><p>2,137</p></td><td><p>3.6</p></td><td><p>3.4</p></td><td><p>3.7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2002</p></td><td><p>2,126</p></td><td><p>3.6</p></td><td><p>3.4</p></td><td><p>3.7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2003</p></td><td><p>2,264</p></td><td><p>3.6</p></td><td><p>3.5</p></td><td><p>3.8</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2004</p></td><td><p>2,209</p></td><td><p>3.5</p></td><td><p>3.3</p></td><td><p>3.6</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2005</p></td><td><p>2,227</p></td><td><p>3.4</p></td><td><p>3.3</p></td><td><p>3.6</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2006</p></td><td><p>2,325</p></td><td><p>3.5</p></td><td><p>3.3</p></td><td><p>3.6</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2007</p></td><td><p>2,248</p></td><td><p>3.3</p></td><td><p>3.1</p></td><td><p>3.4</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2008</p></td><td><p>2,261</p></td><td><p>3.2</p></td><td><p>3.1</p></td><td><p>3.3</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2009</p></td><td><p>2,205</p></td><td><p>3.1</p></td><td><p>3.0</p></td><td><p>3.3</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010</p></td><td><p>2,123</p></td><td><p>2.9</p></td><td><p>2.8</p></td><td><p>3.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2011</p></td><td><p>2,135</p></td><td><p>2.9</p></td><td><p>2.8</p></td><td><p>3.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2012</p></td><td><p>2,042</p></td><td><p>2.8</p></td><td><p>2.7</p></td><td><p>2.9</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>1,871</p></td><td><p>2.7</p></td><td><p>2.6</p></td><td><p>2.8</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2014</p></td><td><p>1,762</p></td><td><p>2.5</p></td><td><p>2.4</p></td><td><p>2.7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2015</p></td><td><p>1,838</p></td><td><p>2.6</p></td><td><p>2.5</p></td><td><p>2.8</p></td></tr></tbody></table><ol><li><p><em>Neonatal deaths are defined as deaths of live-born infants at less than 28 days</em></p></li><li><p><em>Rates are per 1,000 live births</em></p></li><li><p><em>The 95% lower and upper confidence limits have been provided. These form a confidence interval, which is a measure of the statistical precision of a rate and shows the range of uncertainty around the calculated rate. As a general rule, if the confidence interval around one figure overlaps with the interval around another, we cannot say with certainty that there is more than a chance difference between the two figures.</em></p></li></ol><p> </p><p>Source: Office for National Statistics</p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Table 2: Neonatal hospital episodes occurring in England, numbers and rates, 2000-02 to 2016-17</p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p>Year</p></td><td><p>Neonatal episodes (FCEs)</p></td><td><p>Neonatal hospitalisation rate</p></td><td><p>Lower confidence limit</p></td><td><p>Upper confidence limit</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2000-01</p></td><td><p>57,983</p></td><td><p>96.3</p></td><td><p>95.5</p></td><td><p>97.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2001-02</p></td><td><p>56,097</p></td><td><p>94.3</p></td><td><p>93.5</p></td><td><p>95.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2002-03</p></td><td><p>58,610</p></td><td><p>97.3</p></td><td><p>96.5</p></td><td><p>98.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2003-04</p></td><td><p>64,574</p></td><td><p>103.1</p></td><td><p>102.4</p></td><td><p>103.9</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2004-05</p></td><td><p>65,873</p></td><td><p>102.7</p></td><td><p>101.9</p></td><td><p>103.5</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2005-06</p></td><td><p>69,000</p></td><td><p>105.9</p></td><td><p>105.1</p></td><td><p>106.7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2006-07</p></td><td><p>74,893</p></td><td><p>111.0</p></td><td><p>110.2</p></td><td><p>111.8</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2007-08</p></td><td><p>84,755</p></td><td><p>122.0</p></td><td><p>121.2</p></td><td><p>122.8</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2008-09</p></td><td><p>91,420</p></td><td><p>129.1</p></td><td><p>128.3</p></td><td><p>129.9</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2009-10</p></td><td><p>96,005</p></td><td><p>135.1</p></td><td><p>134.3</p></td><td><p>136.0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010-11</p></td><td><p>102,847</p></td><td><p>142.2</p></td><td><p>141.3</p></td><td><p>143.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2011-12</p></td><td><p>101,577</p></td><td><p>140.0</p></td><td><p>139.2</p></td><td><p>140.9</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2012-13</p></td><td><p>106,531</p></td><td><p>147.6</p></td><td><p>146.7</p></td><td><p>148.5</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2013-14</p></td><td><p>109,509</p></td><td><p>157.0</p></td><td><p>156.0</p></td><td><p>157.9</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2014-15</p></td><td><p>114,229</p></td><td><p>164.1</p></td><td><p>163.2</p></td><td><p>165.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2015-16</p></td><td><p>114,420</p></td><td><p>164.1</p></td><td><p>163.1</p></td><td><p>165.0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2016-17*</p></td><td><p>116,573</p></td><td><p>-</p></td><td><p>-</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2000-01 to 2004-05†</p></td><td><p>301,700</p></td><td><p>98.4</p></td><td><p>98.0</p></td><td><p>98.7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2005-06 to 2009-10†</p></td><td><p>414,060</p></td><td><p>120.4</p></td><td><p>120.0</p></td><td><p>120.7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010-11 to 2014-15†</p></td><td><p>532,149</p></td><td><p>149.3</p></td><td><p>148.9</p></td><td><p>149.7</p></td></tr></tbody></table><ol><li><p><em>Neonatal episodes are defined as counts of patients where there is a finished consultant episode (FCE) for neonates with an extended hospital stay immediately following birth, or an admission within the first 28 days of life. An FCE is a continuous period of admitted patient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider. FCEs are counted against the year in which they end. Figures do not represent the number of different patients, as a person may have more than one episode of care within the same stay in hospital or in different stays in the same year.</em></p></li><li><p><em>Rates are per 1,000 live births. The number of births per financial year has been estimated based on births in the relevant calendar years.</em></p></li><li><p><em>The 95% lower and upper confidence limits have been provided. These form a confidence interval, which is a measure of the statistical precision of a rate and shows the range of uncertainty around the calculated rate. As a general rule, if the confidence interval around one figure overlaps with the interval around another, we cannot say with certainty that there is more than a chance difference between the two figures.</em></p></li></ol><p><em>* A rate for 2016-17 cannot be calculated as the number of births in 2017 is not yet available.</em></p><p><em>† As a patient may have been in hospital in two consecutive years, the total per five-year grouping will not be equal to a sum of the corresponding five individual years.</em></p><p> </p><p><em>Source: NHS Digital and Office for National Statistics</em></p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
HL5970 more like this
HL5971 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2018-03-14T16:44:48.14Zmore like thismore than 2018-03-14T16:44:48.14Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
200
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Tonge more like this
852487
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2018-02-28more like thismore than 2018-02-28
star this property answering body
Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 53 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Cabinet Office more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Neonatal Mortality more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the incidence of neonatal mortality and morbidity in (1) 2000–05, (2) 2005–10, and (3) 2010–15. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Tonge remove filter
star this property uin HL5970 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction true more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2018-03-14more like thismore than 2018-03-14
star this property answer text <p><strong><strong>​</strong></strong></p><p>The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply<del class="ministerial">.</del><ins class="ministerial"> and I will place a copy of their letter in the Library</ins><br /><ins class="ministerial">of the House.</ins></p><p><em><strong>Letter from John Pullinger CB, National Statistician, to Baroness Tonge, dated 07 March 2018</strong></em></p><p>Dear Baroness Tonge,</p><p>As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am replying to your Parliamentary Questions asking (a) whether the incidence of neonatal mortality and morbidity has decreased over the past five years (HL5969); (b) what was the incidence of neonatal mortality and morbidity in (1) 2000–05, (2) 2005–10, and (3) 2010–15 (HL5970); and (c) what was the incidence of neonatal mortality and morbidity in (1) 2014–15, (2) 2015–16, and (3) 2016–17 (HL5971).</p><p>The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is responsible for publishing statistics on deaths registered in England and Wales. Statistics on deaths are normally published using calendar years. Neonatal mortality figures are available for both the year the death was registered and the year the death occurred. Comparisons over time are more meaningful using death occurrences, to allow for delays in registering deaths. The latest year for which death occurrence figures are available is 2015 [see note 1 below]. The neonatal mortality figures for 2016 will be published on 14 March 2018 and the data for 2017 will be published in early 2019.</p><p>Table 1 below provides the number of neonatal deaths and the neonatal mortality rates per 1,000 live births for England and Wales, for each calendar year from 2000 to 2015.</p><p>Because the number of neonatal deaths each year is relatively small, there is likely to be some random fluctuation, and no single year since 2000 shows a statistically significant change from the preceding year. However, there has been a generally downward trend throughout the period. In the five years 2011-15, the lowest neonatal mortality rate was in 2014, and this was significantly lower than in 2011 and all previous years. The rate in 2015 was higher than in 2014, but is still significantly lower than in 2011 (taking into account rounding of the figures to one decimal place).</p><p>NHS Digital is responsible for publishing statistics on NHS patient care in England. There is no widely accepted measure of neonatal morbidity, however trends in the admission of neonates to hospital may be useful information. Therefore, figures based on Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) have been given here.</p><p>Table 2 below provides the number of neonatal finished consultant episodes (FCEs) and corresponding neonatal hospitalisation rate per 1,000 live births for England, for each financial year from 2000-01 to 2016-17, and the five-year periods 2001-02 to 2004-05, 2005-06 to 2009-10, and 2010-11 to 2014-15. Note that HES data include activity ending in the year in question and run from April to March, e.g. 2012-13 includes activity ending between 1st April 2012 and 31st March 2013.</p><p>Changes to the HES figures over time need to be interpreted in the context of improvements in data quality and coverage (particularly in earlier years), improvements in coverage of independent sector activity (particularly from 2006-07) and changes in NHS practice. For example, apparent reductions in activity may be due to a number of procedures which may now be undertaken in outpatient settings and so no longer include in admitted patient HES data. Conversely, apparent increases in activity may be due to improved recording of diagnosis or procedure information.</p><p>There has been year on year fluctuation in the number and rate of hospital episodes for neonates over the period of interest, but with a clear overall upward trend. The hospitalisation rate in 2015-16 was significantly higher than five years before. However, as noted above, it is likely that the trend is influenced to some extent by factors such as changing clinical practice and recording.</p><p>Yours sincerely,</p><p>John Pullinger</p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Note 1:</p><p><a href="https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/datasets/childmortalitystatisticschildhoodinfantandperinatalchildhoodinfantandperinatalmortalityinenglandandwales" target="_blank">https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/datasets/childmortalitystatisticschildhoodinfantandperinatalchildhoodinfantandperinatalmortalityinenglandandwales</a></p><p> </p><p>Table 1: Neonatal deaths occurring in England and Wales, numbers and rates, 2000 to 2015</p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p>Year</p></td><td><p>Neonatal deaths</p></td><td><p>Neonatal mortality rate</p></td><td><p>Lower confidence limit</p></td><td><p>Upper confidence limit</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2000</p></td><td><p>2,335</p></td><td><p>3.9</p></td><td><p>3.7</p></td><td><p>4.0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2001</p></td><td><p>2,137</p></td><td><p>3.6</p></td><td><p>3.4</p></td><td><p>3.7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2002</p></td><td><p>2,126</p></td><td><p>3.6</p></td><td><p>3.4</p></td><td><p>3.7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2003</p></td><td><p>2,264</p></td><td><p>3.6</p></td><td><p>3.5</p></td><td><p>3.8</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2004</p></td><td><p>2,209</p></td><td><p>3.5</p></td><td><p>3.3</p></td><td><p>3.6</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2005</p></td><td><p>2,227</p></td><td><p>3.4</p></td><td><p>3.3</p></td><td><p>3.6</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2006</p></td><td><p>2,325</p></td><td><p>3.5</p></td><td><p>3.3</p></td><td><p>3.6</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2007</p></td><td><p>2,248</p></td><td><p>3.3</p></td><td><p>3.1</p></td><td><p>3.4</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2008</p></td><td><p>2,261</p></td><td><p>3.2</p></td><td><p>3.1</p></td><td><p>3.3</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2009</p></td><td><p>2,205</p></td><td><p>3.1</p></td><td><p>3.0</p></td><td><p>3.3</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010</p></td><td><p>2,123</p></td><td><p>2.9</p></td><td><p>2.8</p></td><td><p>3.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2011</p></td><td><p>2,135</p></td><td><p>2.9</p></td><td><p>2.8</p></td><td><p>3.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2012</p></td><td><p>2,042</p></td><td><p>2.8</p></td><td><p>2.7</p></td><td><p>2.9</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>1,871</p></td><td><p>2.7</p></td><td><p>2.6</p></td><td><p>2.8</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2014</p></td><td><p>1,762</p></td><td><p>2.5</p></td><td><p>2.4</p></td><td><p>2.7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2015</p></td><td><p>1,838</p></td><td><p>2.6</p></td><td><p>2.5</p></td><td><p>2.8</p></td></tr></tbody></table><ol><li><p><em>Neonatal deaths are defined as deaths of live-born infants at less than 28 days</em></p></li><li><p><em>Rates are per 1,000 live births</em></p></li><li><p><em>The 95% lower and upper confidence limits have been provided. These form a confidence interval, which is a measure of the statistical precision of a rate and shows the range of uncertainty around the calculated rate. As a general rule, if the confidence interval around one figure overlaps with the interval around another, we cannot say with certainty that there is more than a chance difference between the two figures.</em></p></li></ol><p> </p><p>Source: Office for National Statistics</p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Table 2: Neonatal hospital episodes occurring in England, numbers and rates, 2000-02 to 2016-17</p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p>Year</p></td><td><p>Neonatal episodes (FCEs)</p></td><td><p>Neonatal hospitalisation rate</p></td><td><p>Lower confidence limit</p></td><td><p>Upper confidence limit</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2000-01</p></td><td><p>57,983</p></td><td><p>96.3</p></td><td><p>95.5</p></td><td><p>97.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2001-02</p></td><td><p>56,097</p></td><td><p>94.3</p></td><td><p>93.5</p></td><td><p>95.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2002-03</p></td><td><p>58,610</p></td><td><p>97.3</p></td><td><p>96.5</p></td><td><p>98.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2003-04</p></td><td><p>64,574</p></td><td><p>103.1</p></td><td><p>102.4</p></td><td><p>103.9</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2004-05</p></td><td><p>65,873</p></td><td><p>102.7</p></td><td><p>101.9</p></td><td><p>103.5</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2005-06</p></td><td><p>69,000</p></td><td><p>105.9</p></td><td><p>105.1</p></td><td><p>106.7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2006-07</p></td><td><p>74,893</p></td><td><p>111.0</p></td><td><p>110.2</p></td><td><p>111.8</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2007-08</p></td><td><p>84,755</p></td><td><p>122.0</p></td><td><p>121.2</p></td><td><p>122.8</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2008-09</p></td><td><p>91,420</p></td><td><p>129.1</p></td><td><p>128.3</p></td><td><p>129.9</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2009-10</p></td><td><p>96,005</p></td><td><p>135.1</p></td><td><p>134.3</p></td><td><p>136.0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010-11</p></td><td><p>102,847</p></td><td><p>142.2</p></td><td><p>141.3</p></td><td><p>143.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2011-12</p></td><td><p>101,577</p></td><td><p>140.0</p></td><td><p>139.2</p></td><td><p>140.9</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2012-13</p></td><td><p>106,531</p></td><td><p>147.6</p></td><td><p>146.7</p></td><td><p>148.5</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2013-14</p></td><td><p>109,509</p></td><td><p>157.0</p></td><td><p>156.0</p></td><td><p>157.9</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2014-15</p></td><td><p>114,229</p></td><td><p>164.1</p></td><td><p>163.2</p></td><td><p>165.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2015-16</p></td><td><p>114,420</p></td><td><p>164.1</p></td><td><p>163.1</p></td><td><p>165.0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2016-17*</p></td><td><p>116,573</p></td><td><p>-</p></td><td><p>-</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2000-01 to 2004-05†</p></td><td><p>301,700</p></td><td><p>98.4</p></td><td><p>98.0</p></td><td><p>98.7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2005-06 to 2009-10†</p></td><td><p>414,060</p></td><td><p>120.4</p></td><td><p>120.0</p></td><td><p>120.7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010-11 to 2014-15†</p></td><td><p>532,149</p></td><td><p>149.3</p></td><td><p>148.9</p></td><td><p>149.7</p></td></tr></tbody></table><ol><li><p><em>Neonatal episodes are defined as counts of patients where there is a finished consultant episode (FCE) for neonates with an extended hospital stay immediately following birth, or an admission within the first 28 days of life. An FCE is a continuous period of admitted patient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider. FCEs are counted against the year in which they end. Figures do not represent the number of different patients, as a person may have more than one episode of care within the same stay in hospital or in different stays in the same year.</em></p></li><li><p><em>Rates are per 1,000 live births. The number of births per financial year has been estimated based on births in the relevant calendar years.</em></p></li><li><p><em>The 95% lower and upper confidence limits have been provided. These form a confidence interval, which is a measure of the statistical precision of a rate and shows the range of uncertainty around the calculated rate. As a general rule, if the confidence interval around one figure overlaps with the interval around another, we cannot say with certainty that there is more than a chance difference between the two figures.</em></p></li></ol><p><em>* A rate for 2016-17 cannot be calculated as the number of births in 2017 is not yet available.</em></p><p><em>† As a patient may have been in hospital in two consecutive years, the total per five-year grouping will not be equal to a sum of the corresponding five individual years.</em></p><p> </p><p><em>Source: NHS Digital and Office for National Statistics</em></p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham more like this
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Cabinet Office more like this
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unstar this property hansard heading Neonatal Mortality more like this
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star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the incidence of neonatal mortality and morbidity in (1) 2014–15, (2) 2015–16, and (3) 2016–17. more like this
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Baroness Tonge remove filter
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unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2018-03-14more like thismore than 2018-03-14
star this property answer text <p><strong><strong>​</strong></strong></p><p>The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.</p><p><em><strong>Letter from John Pullinger CB, National Statistician, to Baroness Tonge, dated 07 March 2018</strong></em></p><p>Dear Baroness Tonge,</p><p>As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am replying to your Parliamentary Questions asking (a) whether the incidence of neonatal mortality and morbidity has decreased over the past five years (HL5969); (b) what was the incidence of neonatal mortality and morbidity in (1) 2000–05, (2) 2005–10, and (3) 2010–15 (HL5970); and (c) what was the incidence of neonatal mortality and morbidity in (1) 2014–15, (2) 2015–16, and (3) 2016–17 (HL5971).</p><p>The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is responsible for publishing statistics on deaths registered in England and Wales. Statistics on deaths are normally published using calendar years. Neonatal mortality figures are available for both the year the death was registered and the year the death occurred. Comparisons over time are more meaningful using death occurrences, to allow for delays in registering deaths. The latest year for which death occurrence figures are available is 2015 [see note 1 below]. The neonatal mortality figures for 2016 will be published on 14 March 2018 and the data for 2017 will be published in early 2019.</p><p>Table 1 below provides the number of neonatal deaths and the neonatal mortality rates per 1,000 live births for England and Wales, for each calendar year from 2000 to 2015.</p><p>Because the number of neonatal deaths each year is relatively small, there is likely to be some random fluctuation, and no single year since 2000 shows a statistically significant change from the preceding year. However, there has been a generally downward trend throughout the period. In the five years 2011-15, the lowest neonatal mortality rate was in 2014, and this was significantly lower than in 2011 and all previous years. The rate in 2015 was higher than in 2014, but is still significantly lower than in 2011 (taking into account rounding of the figures to one decimal place).</p><p>NHS Digital is responsible for publishing statistics on NHS patient care in England. There is no widely accepted measure of neonatal morbidity, however trends in the admission of neonates to hospital may be useful information. Therefore, figures based on Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) have been given here.</p><p>Table 2 below provides the number of neonatal finished consultant episodes (FCEs) and corresponding neonatal hospitalisation rate per 1,000 live births for England, for each financial year from 2000-01 to 2016-17, and the five-year periods 2001-02 to 2004-05, 2005-06 to 2009-10, and 2010-11 to 2014-15. Note that HES data include activity ending in the year in question and run from April to March, e.g. 2012-13 includes activity ending between 1st April 2012 and 31st March 2013.</p><p>Changes to the HES figures over time need to be interpreted in the context of improvements in data quality and coverage (particularly in earlier years), improvements in coverage of independent sector activity (particularly from 2006-07) and changes in NHS practice. For example, apparent reductions in activity may be due to a number of procedures which may now be undertaken in outpatient settings and so no longer include in admitted patient HES data. Conversely, apparent increases in activity may be due to improved recording of diagnosis or procedure information.</p><p>There has been year on year fluctuation in the number and rate of hospital episodes for neonates over the period of interest, but with a clear overall upward trend. The hospitalisation rate in 2015-16 was significantly higher than five years before. However, as noted above, it is likely that the trend is influenced to some extent by factors such as changing clinical practice and recording.</p><p>Yours sincerely,</p><p>John Pullinger</p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Note 1:</p><p><a href="https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/datasets/childmortalitystatisticschildhoodinfantandperinatalchildhoodinfantandperinatalmortalityinenglandandwales" target="_blank">https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/datasets/childmortalitystatisticschildhoodinfantandperinatalchildhoodinfantandperinatalmortalityinenglandandwales</a></p><p> </p><p>Table 1: Neonatal deaths occurring in England and Wales, numbers and rates, 2000 to 2015</p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p>Year</p></td><td><p>Neonatal deaths</p></td><td><p>Neonatal mortality rate</p></td><td><p>Lower confidence limit</p></td><td><p>Upper confidence limit</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2000</p></td><td><p>2,335</p></td><td><p>3.9</p></td><td><p>3.7</p></td><td><p>4.0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2001</p></td><td><p>2,137</p></td><td><p>3.6</p></td><td><p>3.4</p></td><td><p>3.7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2002</p></td><td><p>2,126</p></td><td><p>3.6</p></td><td><p>3.4</p></td><td><p>3.7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2003</p></td><td><p>2,264</p></td><td><p>3.6</p></td><td><p>3.5</p></td><td><p>3.8</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2004</p></td><td><p>2,209</p></td><td><p>3.5</p></td><td><p>3.3</p></td><td><p>3.6</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2005</p></td><td><p>2,227</p></td><td><p>3.4</p></td><td><p>3.3</p></td><td><p>3.6</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2006</p></td><td><p>2,325</p></td><td><p>3.5</p></td><td><p>3.3</p></td><td><p>3.6</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2007</p></td><td><p>2,248</p></td><td><p>3.3</p></td><td><p>3.1</p></td><td><p>3.4</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2008</p></td><td><p>2,261</p></td><td><p>3.2</p></td><td><p>3.1</p></td><td><p>3.3</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2009</p></td><td><p>2,205</p></td><td><p>3.1</p></td><td><p>3.0</p></td><td><p>3.3</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010</p></td><td><p>2,123</p></td><td><p>2.9</p></td><td><p>2.8</p></td><td><p>3.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2011</p></td><td><p>2,135</p></td><td><p>2.9</p></td><td><p>2.8</p></td><td><p>3.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2012</p></td><td><p>2,042</p></td><td><p>2.8</p></td><td><p>2.7</p></td><td><p>2.9</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>1,871</p></td><td><p>2.7</p></td><td><p>2.6</p></td><td><p>2.8</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2014</p></td><td><p>1,762</p></td><td><p>2.5</p></td><td><p>2.4</p></td><td><p>2.7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2015</p></td><td><p>1,838</p></td><td><p>2.6</p></td><td><p>2.5</p></td><td><p>2.8</p></td></tr></tbody></table><ol><li><p><em>Neonatal deaths are defined as deaths of live-born infants at less than 28 days</em></p></li><li><p><em>Rates are per 1,000 live births</em></p></li><li><p><em>The 95% lower and upper confidence limits have been provided. These form a confidence interval, which is a measure of the statistical precision of a rate and shows the range of uncertainty around the calculated rate. As a general rule, if the confidence interval around one figure overlaps with the interval around another, we cannot say with certainty that there is more than a chance difference between the two figures.</em></p></li></ol><p> </p><p>Source: Office for National Statistics</p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Table 2: Neonatal hospital episodes occurring in England, numbers and rates, 2000-02 to 2016-17</p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p>Year</p></td><td><p>Neonatal episodes (FCEs)</p></td><td><p>Neonatal hospitalisation rate</p></td><td><p>Lower confidence limit</p></td><td><p>Upper confidence limit</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2000-01</p></td><td><p>57,983</p></td><td><p>96.3</p></td><td><p>95.5</p></td><td><p>97.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2001-02</p></td><td><p>56,097</p></td><td><p>94.3</p></td><td><p>93.5</p></td><td><p>95.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2002-03</p></td><td><p>58,610</p></td><td><p>97.3</p></td><td><p>96.5</p></td><td><p>98.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2003-04</p></td><td><p>64,574</p></td><td><p>103.1</p></td><td><p>102.4</p></td><td><p>103.9</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2004-05</p></td><td><p>65,873</p></td><td><p>102.7</p></td><td><p>101.9</p></td><td><p>103.5</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2005-06</p></td><td><p>69,000</p></td><td><p>105.9</p></td><td><p>105.1</p></td><td><p>106.7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2006-07</p></td><td><p>74,893</p></td><td><p>111.0</p></td><td><p>110.2</p></td><td><p>111.8</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2007-08</p></td><td><p>84,755</p></td><td><p>122.0</p></td><td><p>121.2</p></td><td><p>122.8</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2008-09</p></td><td><p>91,420</p></td><td><p>129.1</p></td><td><p>128.3</p></td><td><p>129.9</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2009-10</p></td><td><p>96,005</p></td><td><p>135.1</p></td><td><p>134.3</p></td><td><p>136.0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010-11</p></td><td><p>102,847</p></td><td><p>142.2</p></td><td><p>141.3</p></td><td><p>143.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2011-12</p></td><td><p>101,577</p></td><td><p>140.0</p></td><td><p>139.2</p></td><td><p>140.9</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2012-13</p></td><td><p>106,531</p></td><td><p>147.6</p></td><td><p>146.7</p></td><td><p>148.5</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2013-14</p></td><td><p>109,509</p></td><td><p>157.0</p></td><td><p>156.0</p></td><td><p>157.9</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2014-15</p></td><td><p>114,229</p></td><td><p>164.1</p></td><td><p>163.2</p></td><td><p>165.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2015-16</p></td><td><p>114,420</p></td><td><p>164.1</p></td><td><p>163.1</p></td><td><p>165.0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2016-17*</p></td><td><p>116,573</p></td><td><p>-</p></td><td><p>-</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2000-01 to 2004-05†</p></td><td><p>301,700</p></td><td><p>98.4</p></td><td><p>98.0</p></td><td><p>98.7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2005-06 to 2009-10†</p></td><td><p>414,060</p></td><td><p>120.4</p></td><td><p>120.0</p></td><td><p>120.7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010-11 to 2014-15†</p></td><td><p>532,149</p></td><td><p>149.3</p></td><td><p>148.9</p></td><td><p>149.7</p></td></tr></tbody></table><ol><li><p><em>Neonatal episodes are defined as counts of patients where there is a finished consultant episode (FCE) for neonates with an extended hospital stay immediately following birth, or an admission within the first 28 days of life. An FCE is a continuous period of admitted patient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider. FCEs are counted against the year in which they end. Figures do not represent the number of different patients, as a person may have more than one episode of care within the same stay in hospital or in different stays in the same year.</em></p></li><li><p><em>Rates are per 1,000 live births. The number of births per financial year has been estimated based on births in the relevant calendar years.</em></p></li><li><p><em>The 95% lower and upper confidence limits have been provided. These form a confidence interval, which is a measure of the statistical precision of a rate and shows the range of uncertainty around the calculated rate. As a general rule, if the confidence interval around one figure overlaps with the interval around another, we cannot say with certainty that there is more than a chance difference between the two figures.</em></p></li></ol><p><em>* A rate for 2016-17 cannot be calculated as the number of births in 2017 is not yet available.</em></p><p><em>† As a patient may have been in hospital in two consecutive years, the total per five-year grouping will not be equal to a sum of the corresponding five individual years.</em></p><p> </p><p><em>Source: NHS Digital and Office for National Statistics</em></p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
HL5969 more like this
HL5970 more like this
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less than 2018-03-14T16:44:47.877Zmore like thismore than 2018-03-14T16:44:47.877Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
200
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Tonge more like this
832840
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2018-01-29more like thismore than 2018-01-29
star this property answering body
Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 53 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Cabinet Office more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Conflict, Stability and Security Fund more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what proportion of the Conflict, Stability and Security Fund is spent on (1) family planning, (2) sexual and reproductive health and rights, and (3) population issues, in the developing world. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Tonge remove filter
star this property uin HL5153 more like this
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answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2018-02-08more like thismore than 2018-02-08
star this property answer text <p>The Conflict, Stability and Security Fund (CSSF) does not fund programmes specifically supporting family planning, sexual and reproductive health and rights, or population issues. The CSSF’s portfolio includes programmes which seek to prevent sexual violence in conflict situations and which empower women to seek justice.</p><p>More broadly, all CSSF programmes must apply the 2014 International Development (Gender Equality) Act. This means integrating activities into all conflict and stabilisation work which are likely to contribute to reducing gender equality.</p><p>Further information on CSSF programmes can be found at</p><p><a href="http://www.gov.uk/government/publications/conflict-stability-and-security-fund-cssf" target="_blank">www.gov.uk/government/publications/conflict-stability-and-security-fund-cssf</a></p><p>Further information on how the CSSF is contributing to the government’s National Action Plan for Women, Peace and Security can be found at</p><p><a href="http://www.gov.uk/government/publications/uk-national-action-plan-on-women-peace-and-security-2018-to-2022" target="_blank">www.gov.uk/government/publications/uk-national-action-plan-on-women-peace-and-security-2018-to-2022</a></p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2018-02-08T17:15:29.57Zmore like thismore than 2018-02-08T17:15:29.57Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property attachment
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star this property file name FCO1215-NAP-Women-Peace-Security-ONLINE_V2.pdf more like this
unstar this property title National Action Plan for Women, Peace and Security more like this
star this property tabling member
200
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Tonge more like this
832841
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2018-01-29more like thismore than 2018-01-29
star this property answering body
Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 53 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Cabinet Office more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Conflict, Stability and Security Fund more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government which countries receive Official Development Assistance through the Conflict, Stability and Security Fund. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Tonge remove filter
star this property uin HL5154 more like this
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unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2018-02-08more like thismore than 2018-02-08
star this property answer text <p>The CSSF provides Official Development Assistance funding to the following countries: Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Burundi, Burma, Chad, Colombia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Dominican Republic, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Georgia, Guyana, Indonesia, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kenya, Kosovo, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Libya, Macedonia, Mali, Moldova, Montenegro, Morocco, Nepal, Nigeria, Niger, Occupied Palestinian Territories, Overseas Territories (including Montserrat, St Helena, Pitcairn and Tristan da Cunha), Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syria, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Tunisia, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Vietnam, and Yemen.</p><p>More information can be found in the Fund’s Annual Report.</p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham more like this
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less than 2018-02-08T12:21:35.503Zmore like thismore than 2018-02-08T12:21:35.503Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
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star this property label Biography information for Baroness Tonge more like this