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34375
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-01-22more like thismore than 2014-01-22
star this property answering body
Department for Communities and Local Government more like this
star this property answering dept id 7 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name
star this property answering dept sort name
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many families were placed in temporary accommodation in each London borough in each of the last five years. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Tooting more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Sadiq Khan more like this
star this property uin 184631 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2014-05-09more like thismore than 2014-05-09
unstar this property answer text <p> </p><p>I refer the rt. hon. Member to Live Table 784 available on my Department's website at: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-homelessness" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-homelessness</a></p><p>The numbers of households in temporary accommodation in London are still well belowthe level they were at their peak, under the previous Administration, when they hit more than 63,800. Councils have a responsibility to move homeless households into settled accommodation as quickly as possible and we made common sense changes to the law to enable them to use suitable private rented homes. Indeed, the average stay in temporary accommodation in England has been reduced from 20 months at the beginning of 2010 to 14 months now.</p><p>We have also seen a 42% reduction in the numbers of families with children in Bed and Breakfast for more than six weeks on this time last year across the country. The seven local authorities that we funded to tackle families in Bed and Breakfast have made significant progress achieving an overall reduction of 96% since the funding began.</p><p> </p><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency Keighley more like this
star this property answering member printed Kris Hopkins more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-05-09T12:00:00.00Zmore like thismore than 2014-05-09T12:00:00.00Z
star this property answering member
4043
star this property label Biography information for Kris Hopkins more like this
star this property tabling member
1577
unstar this property label Biography information for Sadiq Khan remove filter
34369
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-01-22more like thismore than 2014-01-22
star this property answering body
Department for Communities and Local Government more like this
star this property answering dept id 7 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name
star this property answering dept sort name
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what the average proportion of market rent of all affordable housing is in each London borough. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Tooting more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Sadiq Khan more like this
star this property uin 184627 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2014-05-14more like thismore than 2014-05-14
unstar this property answer text <p> </p><p>I have placed in the Library of the House, a table showing affordable and social rents as a proportion of market rents, for each London borough.</p><p>The affordable rent model allows for more new affordable housing to be delivered with lower levels of taxpayer capital subsidy and by levering in more private investment. The programme is helping deliver £15 billion of private investment in new affordable housing over the current spending review, alongside £4.5 billion of public investment. Social rent and affordable rent go hand in hand; both help provide accommodation for those on low incomes.</p><p>As the National Audit Office has observed: “the Department selected the best delivery model open to it for the funds it had available” and “the Department has so far achieved its policy objective to maximise the number of homes delivered within the available grant funding” (National Audit Office, “Financial viability of the social housing sector: introducing the Affordable Homes Programme”, 4 July 2012, <em>HC465,</em> pp.6-7).</p><p>I note in his recent Fabian Society pamphlet, the rt. hon. Member has complained that affordable rent would result in rents of 80 per cent of market rents in London. Whilst it varies by borough, as the table shows, for example, affordable rent levels are 38 per cent of average local market rents in Camden, 48 per cent in Islington, 54 per cent in Southwark and 35 per cent in Westminster, reflecting local circumstances.</p><p>I also observe that the housing policy announced at the Labour Party Conference in October 2012 also endorsed the use of affordable rents to build new homes; albeit this point is frequently lost on many Labour hon. Members who proceed to attack the basic principle of affordable rent in allowing more new affordable homes to be built using taxpayer capital subsidy.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency Keighley more like this
star this property answering member printed Kris Hopkins more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-05-14T12:00:00.00Zmore like thismore than 2014-05-14T12:00:00.00Z
star this property answering member
4043
star this property label Biography information for Kris Hopkins more like this
star this property tabling member
1577
unstar this property label Biography information for Sadiq Khan remove filter
41941
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-03-06more like thismore than 2014-03-06
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name
star this property answering dept sort name
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many UK citizens have been returned to the UK from abroad to serve their custodial sentences under the EU Prisoner Transfer Agreement in each year since that agreement came into force; of what offences they were convicted; what length of custodial sentence they received; and how long they had left to serve in custody at the time of their repatriation. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Tooting more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Sadiq Khan more like this
star this property uin 191087 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2014-04-09more like thismore than 2014-04-09
unstar this property answer text <p> </p><p> </p><p>The Council Framework Decision 2008/909/JHA (The EU PTA) entered into force on 5<sup>th</sup> December 2011.</p><p> </p><p>To date 18 Member States (including the United Kingdom) have implemented the Agreement. The European Court of Justice will have jurisdiction over the measure from 1 December 2014 and Member States may face infraction proceedings if they have not implemented the Agreement by then.</p><p> </p><p>Use of the EU PTA is an early stage and the number of prisoners transferred remains low. However, we expect to see a significant increase in the number of prisoner transferred once the Agreement has been implemented by all Member States.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p>To date 17 prisoners have been transferred to other jurisdictions.</p><p> </p><p>The table below sets out the number of prisoners transferred from England and Wales to other EU Member States since the implementation of the EU PTA in December 2011.</p><p> </p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p>Receiving State</p></td><td><p>Year of Transfer</p></td><td><p>Sentence Length</p></td><td><p>Time left to serve in the United Kingdom on the date of transfer</p></td><td><p>Offence Type</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Belgium</p></td><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>8 Years</p></td><td><p>1016 days</p></td><td><p>Wounding with intent</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Belgium</p></td><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>5 years, 5 months</p></td><td><p>634 days</p></td><td><p>Facilitating illegal entry</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Belgium</p></td><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>9 Years</p></td><td><p>1135 days</p></td><td><p>Drugs</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Latvia</p></td><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>10 years</p></td><td><p>882 days</p></td><td><p>Death by dangerous driving</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Malta</p></td><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>6 years</p></td><td><p>578 days</p></td><td><p>Sexual offences</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>The Netherlands</p></td><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>7 years</p></td><td><p>1043 days</p></td><td><p>Drugs</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>The Netherlands</p></td><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>15 years</p></td><td><p>2098 days</p></td><td><p>Drugs</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>The Netherlands</p></td><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>10 years</p></td><td><p>1189 days</p></td><td><p>Drugs</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>The Netherlands</p></td><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>6 years</p></td><td><p>544 days</p></td><td><p>Drugs</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>The Netherlands</p></td><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>5 years, 3 months</p></td><td><p>437 days</p></td><td><p>Sex offences</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>The Netherlands</p></td><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>6 years, 6 months</p></td><td><p>793 days</p></td><td><p>Drugs</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>The Netherlands</p></td><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>5 years, 6 months</p></td><td><p>608 days</p></td><td><p>Drugs</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>The Netherlands</p></td><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>5 years, 6 months</p></td><td><p>638 days</p></td><td><p>Drugs</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>The Netherlands</p></td><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>Indeterminate Sentence for Public Protection</p></td><td><p>Not applicable</p></td><td><p>Sexual offences</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>The Netherlands</p></td><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>4 years, 8 months</p></td><td><p>355 days</p></td><td><p>Drugs</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>The Netherlands</p></td><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>7 years</p></td><td><p>705 days</p></td><td><p>Drugs</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>The Netherlands</p></td><td><p>2014</p></td><td><p>4 years</p></td><td><p>388 days</p></td><td><p>Drugs</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p> </p><p>The table below sets out the number of British nationals transferred from other EU Member States to England and Wales since the EU PTA entered into force in December 2011. 10 prisoners have been transferred.</p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p>Sentencing State</p></td><td><p>Year of Transfer</p></td><td><p>Sentence Length</p></td><td><p>Time left to serve in custody following transfer</p></td><td><p>Offence Type</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Belgium</p></td><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>3 years, 11 months</p></td><td><p>415 days</p></td><td><p>Drugs</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Belgium</p></td><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>5 years</p></td><td><p>476 days</p></td><td><p>Human Trafficking</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Belgium</p></td><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>8 years</p></td><td><p>1195 days</p></td><td><p>Sexual Offences</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Denmark</p></td><td><p>2012</p></td><td><p>14 years</p></td><td><p>1324 days</p></td><td><p>Drugs</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Denmark</p></td><td><p>2012</p></td><td><p>3 years</p></td><td><p>146 days</p></td><td><p>Drugs</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Denmark</p></td><td><p>2012</p></td><td><p>2 years</p></td><td><p>124 days</p></td><td><p>Fraud</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Italy</p></td><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>5 year, 4 months</p></td><td><p>974 days</p></td><td><p>Drugs</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Italy</p></td><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>9 years, 6 months</p></td><td><p>1617 days</p></td><td><p>Drugs</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Italy</p></td><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>2 years, 10 months</p></td><td><p>267 days</p></td><td><p>Drugs</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Italy</p></td><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>15 years, 4 months</p></td><td><p>1847 days</p></td><td><p>Drugs</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p> </p><p><em>*The figures given in the attached tables relate to England and Wales only. The transfer of prisoners to Scotland and to Northern Ireland is a devolved matter, and is therefore the responsibility of the relevant Minister. </em></p><p> </p><p><em>**The numbers reported here are drawn from a Prison Service Case Tracking System. Care is taken when processing these cases but the figures may be subject to inaccuracies associated with any recording system.</em></p><p>All foreign national offenders (FNOs) sentenced to custody are referred to the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Home_Office" target="_blank">Home Office</a> for them to consider deportation at the earliest possible opportunity.</p><p>The Prisoner Transfer process is just one mechanism for removing Foreign National Offenders. The number of FNOs deported under the Early Removal Scheme (ERS) has increased under this Government. In 2013, we removed nearly 2,000 FNOs under ERS and under the Tariff Expired Removal Scheme (TERS), which was introduced in May 2012, we have removed 231 FNOs to date.</p><p>Whereas this Government has begun to reduce the foreign national population in prison since 2010, between 1997 and 2010, the number of foreign nationals in our prisons more than doubled</p>
star this property answering member constituency Kenilworth and Southam more like this
star this property answering member printed Jeremy Wright more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
191086 more like this
191092 more like this
191093 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-04-09T12:00:00.00Zmore like thismore than 2014-04-09T12:00:00.00Z
star this property answering member
1560
star this property label Biography information for Jeremy Wright more like this
star this property tabling member
1577
unstar this property label Biography information for Sadiq Khan remove filter
41020
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-03-03more like thismore than 2014-03-03
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name
star this property answering dept sort name
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many absconds from prison there have been, by month and category of prisoner, since May 2010. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Tooting more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Sadiq Khan more like this
star this property uin 190288 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2014-04-01more like thismore than 2014-04-01
unstar this property answer text <p>Releases in error are taken very seriously and action has been taken to tighten processes and focus managers' attention in this area. Releases in error are infrequent and all incidents are subject to investigation.The majority of prisoners released in error are returned to custody quickly. In the 12 months to September 2013 there were 46 releases in error from prison, which equated to 0.06% of all discharges from prison. This compares to 68 in 2009-10.</p><p> </p><p>The table below shows the number of prisoners who have not subsequently returned to custody following a release in error from prison between May 2010 and September 2013 and broken down by the security category recorded on the National Offender Management Information System. This information is accurate as of 4 March 2014.</p><p> </p><p><strong>Table 1 Number of prisoners not subsequently returned to custody following release in error from prison between May 2010 and September 2013, by category</strong></p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p><strong>Category</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Number</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Category C</p></td><td><p>13</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Female (Closed)</p></td><td><p>3</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Uncategorised</p></td><td><p>8</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p>It is important to note that not all prisoners released in error will be unlawfully at large and subject to recall. For example, they may be unconvicted prisoners released in error whose cases have been concluded since their release without a custodial sentence.</p><p> </p><p><em>These figures have been drawn from live administrative data systems which may be amended at any time. Although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large scale recording system. </em></p><p> </p><p><em>The number of releases in error may change should further incidents be reported.</em></p><p> </p><p>The number of absconds has come down sharply from a level of 947 in 2002-3 to 204 in 2012-13.</p><p> </p><p>Table 2 provides a breakdown of the number of absconds, by month between May 2010 and March 2013. Table 3 shows the number of absconders still unlawfully at large, by category, having absconded between May 2010 and March 2013. It is not possible to provide details of absconds by category of prisoner. The category of prisoner at time of release in error is not recorded in incident reports and live data shows details of the current security category only; it has therefore only been possible to provide the category of those who are currently unlawfully at large (table 3). Prisoners held in immigration removal centres are not subject to security categorisation. Over 97% of prisoners who abscond are re-captured and returned to custody. On re-capture the prisoner will be returned to a closed prison and referred to the police for consideration for prosecution for having been unlawfully at large.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p><strong>Table 2 Number of absconds between May 2010 and March 2013, by month </strong></p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p><strong>Month</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Number of absconds</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p>May 10</p></td><td><p>23</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>June 10</p></td><td><p>21</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>July 10</p></td><td><p>17</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>August 10</p></td><td><p>25</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>September 10</p></td><td><p>28</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>October 10</p></td><td><p>17</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>November 10</p></td><td><p>15</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>December 10</p></td><td><p>23</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>January 11</p></td><td><p>11</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>February 11</p></td><td><p>15</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>March 11</p></td><td><p>14</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>April 11</p></td><td><p>8</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>May 11</p></td><td><p>12</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>June 11</p></td><td><p>16</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>July 11</p></td><td><p>13</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>August 11</p></td><td><p>17</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>September 11</p></td><td><p>16</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>October 11</p></td><td><p>19</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>November 11</p></td><td><p>16</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>December 11</p></td><td><p>17</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>January 12</p></td><td><p>9</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>February 12</p></td><td><p>12</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>March 12</p></td><td><p>20</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>April 12</p></td><td><p>21</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>May 12</p></td><td><p>15</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>June 12</p></td><td><p>17</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>July 12</p></td><td><p>20</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>August 12</p></td><td><p>23</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>September 12</p></td><td><p>15</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>October 12</p></td><td><p>15</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>November 12</p></td><td><p>12</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>December 12</p></td><td><p>20</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>January 13</p></td><td><p>15</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>February 13</p></td><td><p>16</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>March 13</p></td><td><p>15</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p><strong>Table 3 Number of prisoners unlawfully at large following abscond between May 2010 and March 2013, by category</strong></p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p><strong>Category</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Number</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p>D</p></td><td><p>16</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Not categorised</p></td><td><p>2</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p><em>These figures have been drawn from live administrative data systems which may be amended at any time. Although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large scale recording system. </em></p><p> </p><p>Escapes from transit include escapes from Prison Service and Contractor Escorts. The majority of escorts take place without incident and escapes whilst in transit are rare; there have been 10 since May 2010. This should be seen in relation to the 871,802 prisoners handled by the escort service in 2012-13 alone.</p><p> </p><p>Table 4 shows the number of escapes in transit, in each month between May 2010 and March 2013. All these prisoners have subsequently been recaptured.</p><p> </p><p><strong>Table 4 Month and category of prisoners who escaped in transit between May 2010 and March 2013</strong></p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p><strong>Month</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Category</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p>May 10</p></td><td><p>Uncategorised</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>May 11</p></td><td><p>Cat B</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>July 11</p></td><td><p>Uncategorised</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>July 11</p></td><td><p>Uncategorised</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>August 11</p></td><td><p>Uncategorised</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>December 11</p></td><td><p>Uncategorised</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>January 12</p></td><td><p>Uncategorised</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>January 12</p></td><td><p>Potential Category A</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>October 12</p></td><td><p>Uncategorised</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>November12</p></td><td><p>Uncategorised</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p> </p><p>The number of both escapes and absconds have reduced significantly in recent years. Figures for the number of escapes and absconds since 1995 are provided in the Prison Digest contained in the Prison and Probation Trusts Performance Statistics. This can be found at</p><p><a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/225234/prison-performance-digest-12-13.xls" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/225234/prison-performance-digest-12-13.xls</a></p><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency Kenilworth and Southam more like this
star this property answering member printed Jeremy Wright more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
190140 more like this
190263 more like this
190287 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-04-01T12:00:00.00Zmore like thismore than 2014-04-01T12:00:00.00Z
star this property answering member
1560
star this property label Biography information for Jeremy Wright more like this
star this property tabling member
1577
unstar this property label Biography information for Sadiq Khan remove filter
42276
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-03-10more like thismore than 2014-03-10
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name
star this property answering dept sort name
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many activity spaces per prisoner there were in (a) adult male prisons, (b) adult female prisons, (c) youth male prisons and (d) youth female prisons on 1 March (i) 2010, (ii) 2011, (iii) 2012 and (iv) 2013 in (A) the prison estate and (B) each prison. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Tooting more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Sadiq Khan more like this
star this property uin 191287 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2014-04-09more like thismore than 2014-04-09
unstar this property answer text <p> </p><p> </p><p>The information requested is not available centrally and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.</p><p> </p><p>However, the number of activity spaces agreed within each public sector prison establishment's Service Level Agreement for 2013-14 is published at the following location: <a href="http://www.justice.gov.uk/information-access-rights/transparency-data/prison-service-level-agreement-and-probation-trust-contracts" target="_blank">http://www.justice.gov.uk/information-access-rights/transparency-data/prison-service-level-agreement-and-probation-trust-contracts</a>.</p><p> </p><p>These documents are a historical record of the public sector prison Service Level Agreements at the point at which they took effect. These agreements remain subject to change, through formal procedures, throughout the year.</p><p> </p><p>Work in prisons is a key priority to ensure prisoners are engaged purposefully while they are in custody. It also gives them the opportunity to learn skills and a work ethic which can increase their chances of finding employment on release, a key element to reducing reoffending.</p><p> </p><p>Our reforms to the Incentives and Earned Privileges national policy framework came into effect in adult prisons on 1 November 2013. Prisoners will be expected to engage in purposeful activity, as well as demonstrate a commitment towards their rehabilitation, reduce their risk of reoffending, behave well and help others if they are to earn privileges.</p><p> </p><p>The number of prisoners working in industrial activity in public sector prisons increased from around 8,600 in 2010-11 to around 9,700 in 2012-13. This delivered an increase in the total hours worked in industrial activities from 10.6 million hours to 13.1 million hours. In addition there are substantial numbers of prisoners who work to keep prisons running on tasks such as cooking, serving meals, maintenance and cleaning.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Kenilworth and Southam more like this
star this property answering member printed Jeremy Wright more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-04-09T12:00:00.00Zmore like thismore than 2014-04-09T12:00:00.00Z
star this property answering member
1560
star this property label Biography information for Jeremy Wright more like this
star this property tabling member
1577
unstar this property label Biography information for Sadiq Khan remove filter
36155
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-01-30more like thismore than 2014-01-30
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name
star this property answering dept sort name
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many confiscation orders (a) were issued and (b) went uncollected in (i) 2010, (ii) 2011, (iii) 2012 and (iv) 2013. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Tooting more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Sadiq Khan more like this
star this property uin 186101 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2014-04-02more like thismore than 2014-04-02
unstar this property answer text <p> </p><p> </p><p>The value of confiscation orders imposed and the amounts outstanding for those orders, both with and without interest, as at 30 January 2014, for the calendar years from 2010 onwards, are set out in the Table A below. The volume of orders imposed and those that remain outstanding is in Table B</p><p><strong>Table A</strong></p><table><tbody><tr><td><p>Year</p></td><td><p>Value of Confiscation Orders Imposed</p></td><td><p>Order Balance Remaining to Collect Excluding Interest</p><p>As at 30/01/2014</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010</p></td><td><p>£276,143,735</p></td><td><p>£167,176,784</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2011</p></td><td><p>£187,128,205</p></td><td><p>£73,910,472</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2012</p></td><td><p>£271,998,720</p></td><td><p>£162,286,156</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>£245,728,131</p></td><td><p>£176,875,895</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Total</p></td><td><p>£980,998,791</p></td><td><p>£580,249,307</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p><strong>Table B</strong></p><table><tbody><tr><td><p>Year</p></td><td><p>Volume of Confiscation Orders Imposed</p></td><td><p>Volume of Orders with an Order Balance Remaining to Collect Excluding Interest</p><p>As at 30/01/2014</p></td><td><p>Total Volume of Orders to Collect Including Interest</p><p>As at 30/01/2014</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010</p></td><td><p>6,214</p></td><td><p>915</p></td><td><p>2,289</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2011</p></td><td><p>6,286</p></td><td><p>1,065</p></td><td><p>2,342</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2012</p></td><td><p>6,458</p></td><td><p>1,386</p></td><td><p>2,399</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>6,139</p></td><td><p>2,500</p></td><td><p>3,141</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Total</p></td><td><p>25,097</p></td><td><p>5,866</p></td><td><p>10,171</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p>Confiscation orders are one of the key mechanisms available to the Government to deprive criminals of the proceeds of their crimes. The value of the order imposed, which is often very high, is based on the criminal benefit attributed to the crime and may, therefore, exceed the value of realisable assets that are known to the Court at the time of imposition. Crucially, an outstanding order stops the criminal benefitting from the proceeds of crime and ensures that, if the assets are discovered in the future, they can be seized.</p><p> </p><p>HM Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) and other enforcement agencies take the issue of recovering criminal assets very seriously and are working to ensure that clamping down on defaulters is a continued priority nationwide.</p><p> </p><p>Although, as the Enforcement Authority, HMCTS owns the debt, it is not always the lead enforcement agency. HMCTS tends to lead on the high volume, low value orders. Prosecution agencies, including the CPS and the Serious Fraud Office, lead on enforcement where they have put Restraint Orders on the defendant's property to protect the asset, or where the professional expertise of an Enforcement Receiver will be required to enforce the confiscation order.</p><p> </p><p>All outstanding amounts are actively pursued using a range of enforcement tools open to us. A confiscation order is a life time order and only amounts up to £50 can be written off. Default sentences of up to 10 years in prison are activated for non payment. Serving the default sentence does not cancel the debt and we will continue to pursue the amount owed. Interest is added to the order balance outstanding at the rate of 8% per annum. The fact that interest accrues at such a high rate and amounts over £50 cannot be written off, contribute to the increasing level of debt. At the end of December 2013, the total amount outstanding was £1.47 billion, of which £372 million was interest alone. At the end of December 2013, including interest £24 million is owed by defendants who are deceased and a further £86 million is owed by defendants who have been deported. Even for those that are deported we still try to actively pursue the defendants assets held abroad, but we rely on the cooperation of overseas enforcement agencies, which is often not forthcoming. The Agencies responsible for enforcement are building better relationships with overseas authorities and engage specialist forensic teams to track down hidden assets.</p><p> </p><p>The amount defendants repaid from their criminal activity across all agencies reached an all time high during 2012/13, with a total of £133.1 million recovered. That represented a 7% increase on the £124.1 million recovered during 2011/12. The total amount recovered has increased for the last four consecutive years and once again we are on course to have another record breaking year this financial year. For the 2013/14 financial year, at the end of December 2013, £102.8 million had been recovered, which is an increase of 2% on the £100.5 million that was collected up to December 2012. Since 2008/09, when £98.8 Million was recovered, the amount collected from criminals has increased by 35%.</p><p> </p><p>HMCTS is seeking a commercial partner to help increase collections, reduce enforcement costs and importantly, ensure more criminals pay. A new national system has been implemented to manage the collection of fixed penalty notices, with all of the Police Forces having transferred to the new platform by June 2013.The continuing improvement the Agencies are making combined with our future plans will ensure that more criminals pay and that taxpayers get better value for money.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency North West Cambridgeshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Mr Shailesh Vara more like this
star this property grouped question UIN 185720 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-04-02T12:00:00.00Zmore like thismore than 2014-04-02T12:00:00.00Z
star this property answering member
1496
star this property label Biography information for Mr Shailesh Vara more like this
star this property tabling member
1577
unstar this property label Biography information for Sadiq Khan remove filter
41019
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-03-03more like thismore than 2014-03-03
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name
star this property answering dept sort name
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many escapes by prisoners there have been while being transported, by category of prisoner, in each month since May 2010. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Tooting more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Sadiq Khan more like this
star this property uin 190287 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2014-04-01more like thismore than 2014-04-01
unstar this property answer text <p>Releases in error are taken very seriously and action has been taken to tighten processes and focus managers' attention in this area. Releases in error are infrequent and all incidents are subject to investigation.The majority of prisoners released in error are returned to custody quickly. In the 12 months to September 2013 there were 46 releases in error from prison, which equated to 0.06% of all discharges from prison. This compares to 68 in 2009-10.</p><p> </p><p>The table below shows the number of prisoners who have not subsequently returned to custody following a release in error from prison between May 2010 and September 2013 and broken down by the security category recorded on the National Offender Management Information System. This information is accurate as of 4 March 2014.</p><p> </p><p><strong>Table 1 Number of prisoners not subsequently returned to custody following release in error from prison between May 2010 and September 2013, by category</strong></p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p><strong>Category</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Number</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Category C</p></td><td><p>13</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Female (Closed)</p></td><td><p>3</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Uncategorised</p></td><td><p>8</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p>It is important to note that not all prisoners released in error will be unlawfully at large and subject to recall. For example, they may be unconvicted prisoners released in error whose cases have been concluded since their release without a custodial sentence.</p><p> </p><p><em>These figures have been drawn from live administrative data systems which may be amended at any time. Although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large scale recording system. </em></p><p> </p><p><em>The number of releases in error may change should further incidents be reported.</em></p><p> </p><p>The number of absconds has come down sharply from a level of 947 in 2002-3 to 204 in 2012-13.</p><p> </p><p>Table 2 provides a breakdown of the number of absconds, by month between May 2010 and March 2013. Table 3 shows the number of absconders still unlawfully at large, by category, having absconded between May 2010 and March 2013. It is not possible to provide details of absconds by category of prisoner. The category of prisoner at time of release in error is not recorded in incident reports and live data shows details of the current security category only; it has therefore only been possible to provide the category of those who are currently unlawfully at large (table 3). Prisoners held in immigration removal centres are not subject to security categorisation. Over 97% of prisoners who abscond are re-captured and returned to custody. On re-capture the prisoner will be returned to a closed prison and referred to the police for consideration for prosecution for having been unlawfully at large.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p><strong>Table 2 Number of absconds between May 2010 and March 2013, by month </strong></p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p><strong>Month</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Number of absconds</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p>May 10</p></td><td><p>23</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>June 10</p></td><td><p>21</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>July 10</p></td><td><p>17</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>August 10</p></td><td><p>25</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>September 10</p></td><td><p>28</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>October 10</p></td><td><p>17</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>November 10</p></td><td><p>15</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>December 10</p></td><td><p>23</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>January 11</p></td><td><p>11</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>February 11</p></td><td><p>15</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>March 11</p></td><td><p>14</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>April 11</p></td><td><p>8</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>May 11</p></td><td><p>12</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>June 11</p></td><td><p>16</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>July 11</p></td><td><p>13</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>August 11</p></td><td><p>17</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>September 11</p></td><td><p>16</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>October 11</p></td><td><p>19</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>November 11</p></td><td><p>16</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>December 11</p></td><td><p>17</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>January 12</p></td><td><p>9</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>February 12</p></td><td><p>12</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>March 12</p></td><td><p>20</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>April 12</p></td><td><p>21</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>May 12</p></td><td><p>15</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>June 12</p></td><td><p>17</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>July 12</p></td><td><p>20</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>August 12</p></td><td><p>23</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>September 12</p></td><td><p>15</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>October 12</p></td><td><p>15</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>November 12</p></td><td><p>12</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>December 12</p></td><td><p>20</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>January 13</p></td><td><p>15</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>February 13</p></td><td><p>16</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>March 13</p></td><td><p>15</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p><strong>Table 3 Number of prisoners unlawfully at large following abscond between May 2010 and March 2013, by category</strong></p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p><strong>Category</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Number</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p>D</p></td><td><p>16</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Not categorised</p></td><td><p>2</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p><em>These figures have been drawn from live administrative data systems which may be amended at any time. Although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large scale recording system. </em></p><p> </p><p>Escapes from transit include escapes from Prison Service and Contractor Escorts. The majority of escorts take place without incident and escapes whilst in transit are rare; there have been 10 since May 2010. This should be seen in relation to the 871,802 prisoners handled by the escort service in 2012-13 alone.</p><p> </p><p>Table 4 shows the number of escapes in transit, in each month between May 2010 and March 2013. All these prisoners have subsequently been recaptured.</p><p> </p><p><strong>Table 4 Month and category of prisoners who escaped in transit between May 2010 and March 2013</strong></p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p><strong>Month</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Category</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p>May 10</p></td><td><p>Uncategorised</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>May 11</p></td><td><p>Cat B</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>July 11</p></td><td><p>Uncategorised</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>July 11</p></td><td><p>Uncategorised</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>August 11</p></td><td><p>Uncategorised</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>December 11</p></td><td><p>Uncategorised</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>January 12</p></td><td><p>Uncategorised</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>January 12</p></td><td><p>Potential Category A</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>October 12</p></td><td><p>Uncategorised</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>November12</p></td><td><p>Uncategorised</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p> </p><p>The number of both escapes and absconds have reduced significantly in recent years. Figures for the number of escapes and absconds since 1995 are provided in the Prison Digest contained in the Prison and Probation Trusts Performance Statistics. This can be found at</p><p><a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/225234/prison-performance-digest-12-13.xls" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/225234/prison-performance-digest-12-13.xls</a></p><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency Kenilworth and Southam more like this
star this property answering member printed Jeremy Wright more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
190140 more like this
190263 more like this
190288 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-04-01T12:00:00.00Zmore like thismore than 2014-04-01T12:00:00.00Z
star this property answering member
1560
star this property label Biography information for Jeremy Wright more like this
star this property tabling member
1577
unstar this property label Biography information for Sadiq Khan remove filter
36157
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-01-30more like thismore than 2014-01-30
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name
star this property answering dept sort name
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many fines have been (a) issued by courts and (b) collected in 2013-14 to date. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Tooting more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Sadiq Khan more like this
star this property uin 185878 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2014-04-02more like thismore than 2014-04-02
unstar this property answer text <p> </p><p> </p><p>For the financial year to date, 1st April 2013 to 30th September 2013 (latest published data) 614,693 financial imposition accounts were opened. Of those accounts opened in that period, 182,183 accounts were closed. A further 199,623 accounts were compliant with their payment terms.</p><p> </p><p>Financial impositions include fines imposed in the Magistrates and Crown courts, costs orders, compensation orders, victim surcharge orders and unpaid fixed penalty notices and penalty notices for disorder which are registered as fines for enforcement. The numbers of accounts closed is the position as at the end of September 2013 and those accounts outstanding could now have been closed or collected.. Accounts that are closed are accounts with a zero balance which could have been by payment or administrative or legal cancellation.</p><p> </p><p>HM Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) takes the issue of financial penalty enforcement very seriously and is working to ensure that clamping down on defaulters is a continued priority nationwide. HMCTS actively pursues all outstanding impositions until certain they cannot be collected. Collection reached an all time high at the end of 2012/13 and collection has continued to rise in this financial year. At the end of September 2013 total collection (all imposition types excluding confiscation orders) was higher than the same point in the previous year and the outstanding balance had reduced since the start of the financial year. On average over the last 12 month 69% of accounts have been either closed or are compliant with payment terms by 12 months after imposition.</p><p> </p><p>HMCTS are actively seeking an external provider for the future delivery of compliance and enforcement services. This will bring the necessary investment and innovation to significantly improve the collection of criminal financial penalties and reduce the cost of the service to the taxpayer.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency North West Cambridgeshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Mr Shailesh Vara more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-04-02T12:00:00.00Zmore like thismore than 2014-04-02T12:00:00.00Z
star this property answering member
1496
star this property label Biography information for Mr Shailesh Vara more like this
star this property tabling member
1577
unstar this property label Biography information for Sadiq Khan remove filter
39032
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-02-13more like thismore than 2014-02-13
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name
star this property answering dept sort name
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many instances of breaches by offenders released on licence there were in each year since 2002. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Tooting more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Sadiq Khan more like this
star this property uin 188583 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2014-04-07more like thismore than 2014-04-07
unstar this property answer text <p> </p><p> </p><p>For offenders the period of post-release supervision on licence forms an integral part of a sentence imposed by the court. The overriding priority is to protect the public from harm and prevent re-offending.</p><p> </p><p>The recall of offenders on licence is designed to protect the public by removing an offender from the community who, by breaching his licence conditions, is considered to present an increased risk of re-offending and where the Probation Service recommends that this is the most effective response to the increased risk, in order to protect the public.</p><p> </p><p>Behaviour that can result in recall includes: the commission of further offences or charges being laid; behaviour which indicates that further offending is imminent; or breaches of licence conditions which undermine the Probation Service's ability to provide effective supervision, such as not living at the address stipulated on the licence or failing to attend probation appointments.</p><p> </p><p>Once recalled, it is the responsibility of the police to apprehend offenders, although all agencies closely co-operate to ensure that they are swiftly returned to custody.</p><p> </p><p>Data on those offenders who had committed minor breaches of licence, were warned, and not recalled to prison are not collected centrally. Those offenders whose breach of licence has resulted in a recall to prison are published quarterly in the Ministry of Justice's Offender Management Statistics Quarterly Bulletin. This may be found at the following web address:</p><p> </p><p><a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/offender-management-statistics-quarterly" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/offender-management-statistics-quarterly</a></p><p> </p><p>The most recent bulletin was published on 30 January 2014, covering all offenders who were recalled to custody since 1 January 1984 and who remained unlawfully at large as at 31 December 2013. Therefore, the total number who remained unlawfully at large as at 31 December 2013 includes some offenders who were recalled before 2001/02.</p><p> </p><p>In over 99 per cent of cases where an offender has been recalled, the individual has successfully been returned to custody. Where an offender has died we are unable to remove them from the list until we receive a death certificate.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The data covering the years since 2001/02 are shown in the table below.</p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p>Financial year</p></td><td><p>Number of recalls</p></td><td><p>Prisoners who remain unlawfully at large</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2001/02</p></td><td><p>5,086</p></td><td><p>29</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2002/03</p></td><td><p>8,406</p></td><td><p>29</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2003/04</p></td><td><p>11,268</p></td><td><p>55</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2004/05</p></td><td><p>11,171</p></td><td><p>30</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2005/06</p></td><td><p>11,450</p></td><td><p>73</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2006/07</p></td><td><p>13,411</p></td><td><p>60</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2007/08</p></td><td><p>13,252</p></td><td><p>65</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2008/09</p></td><td><p>13,467</p></td><td><p>76</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2009/10</p></td><td><p>15,004</p></td><td><p>89</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010/11</p></td><td><p>15,631</p></td><td><p>79</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2011/12</p></td><td><p>16,591</p></td><td><p>118</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2012/13</p></td><td><p>16,307</p></td><td><p>127</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Apr-September 2013</p></td><td><p>8,847</p></td><td><p>146</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Data on the number of releases on temporary release licence (ROTL) since 1995-6, and temporary release failures since 2004-5 are published in the NOMS Prison Performance Digest. This may be found at the following web address:</p><p> </p><p><a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/225234/prison-performance-digest-12-13.xls" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/225234/prison-performance-digest-12-13.xls</a></p><p> </p><p>The most recent data were published on 25 July 2013.</p><p> </p><p>Data on ROTL and recorded temporary release failures are shown in the table below.</p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p>Financial year</p></td><td><p>Release on temporary licence</p></td><td><p>Recorded temporary release failures</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2001/02</p></td><td><p>273,569</p></td><td><p>293</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2002/03</p></td><td><p>294,112</p></td><td><p>312</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2003/04</p></td><td><p>342,742</p></td><td><p>395</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2004/05</p></td><td><p>397,969</p></td><td><p>366</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2005/06</p></td><td><p>407,199</p></td><td><p>360</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2006/07</p></td><td><p>409,139</p></td><td><p>306</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2007/08</p></td><td><p>434,728</p></td><td><p>248</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2008/09</p></td><td><p>431,351</p></td><td><p>277</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2009/10</p></td><td><p>419,016</p></td><td><p>274</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010/11</p></td><td><p>431,178</p></td><td><p>281</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2011/12</p></td><td><p>488,158</p></td><td><p>404</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2012/13</p></td><td><p>518,862</p></td><td><p>431</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p>Not all temporary release failures are recorded on central administrative systems. Those that are not recorded centrally are more likely to be low-level failures including, for example, returning with unauthorised possessions. These failures are managed locally. Where failures are recorded, the central administrative system only allows for one reason to be recorded; where it is a failure to return this takes priority.</p><p> </p><p>The number of prisoners unlawfully at large (UAL) having failed to return from release on temporary licence for each financial year since 2004/05 is shown in the table below.</p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p>Financial year</p></td><td><p>Number of prisoners who remain UAL following failure to return from ROTL</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2004/05</p></td><td><p>15</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2005/06</p></td><td><p>10</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2006/07</p></td><td><p>10</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2007/08</p></td><td><p>4</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2008/09</p></td><td><p>5</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2009/10</p></td><td><p>7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010/11</p></td><td><p>3</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2011/12</p></td><td><p>7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2012/13</p></td><td><p>7</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p>To provide the number of temporary release failures where the prisoner has failed to return and remains unlawfully at large prior to this date would require the manual interrogation of 1,000 temporary release records which could be done only at disproportionate cost.</p><p> </p><p>These figures have all been drawn from live administrative data systems which may be amended at any time. Although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large scale recording system.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency Kenilworth and Southam more like this
star this property answering member printed Jeremy Wright more like this
star this property grouped question UIN 188584 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-04-07T12:00:00.00Zmore like thismore than 2014-04-07T12:00:00.00Z
star this property answering member
1560
star this property label Biography information for Jeremy Wright more like this
star this property tabling member
1577
unstar this property label Biography information for Sadiq Khan remove filter
39033
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-02-13more like thismore than 2014-02-13
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name
star this property answering dept sort name
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many instances of offenders remaining at large after (a) recall and (b) temporary release there were in each year since 2002. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Tooting more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Sadiq Khan more like this
star this property uin 188584 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2014-04-07more like thismore than 2014-04-07
unstar this property answer text <p> </p><p> </p><p>For offenders the period of post-release supervision on licence forms an integral part of a sentence imposed by the court. The overriding priority is to protect the public from harm and prevent re-offending.</p><p> </p><p>The recall of offenders on licence is designed to protect the public by removing an offender from the community who, by breaching his licence conditions, is considered to present an increased risk of re-offending and where the Probation Service recommends that this is the most effective response to the increased risk, in order to protect the public.</p><p> </p><p>Behaviour that can result in recall includes: the commission of further offences or charges being laid; behaviour which indicates that further offending is imminent; or breaches of licence conditions which undermine the Probation Service's ability to provide effective supervision, such as not living at the address stipulated on the licence or failing to attend probation appointments.</p><p> </p><p>Once recalled, it is the responsibility of the police to apprehend offenders, although all agencies closely co-operate to ensure that they are swiftly returned to custody.</p><p> </p><p>Data on those offenders who had committed minor breaches of licence, were warned, and not recalled to prison are not collected centrally. Those offenders whose breach of licence has resulted in a recall to prison are published quarterly in the Ministry of Justice's Offender Management Statistics Quarterly Bulletin. This may be found at the following web address:</p><p> </p><p><a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/offender-management-statistics-quarterly" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/offender-management-statistics-quarterly</a></p><p> </p><p>The most recent bulletin was published on 30 January 2014, covering all offenders who were recalled to custody since 1 January 1984 and who remained unlawfully at large as at 31 December 2013. Therefore, the total number who remained unlawfully at large as at 31 December 2013 includes some offenders who were recalled before 2001/02.</p><p> </p><p>In over 99 per cent of cases where an offender has been recalled, the individual has successfully been returned to custody. Where an offender has died we are unable to remove them from the list until we receive a death certificate.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The data covering the years since 2001/02 are shown in the table below.</p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p>Financial year</p></td><td><p>Number of recalls</p></td><td><p>Prisoners who remain unlawfully at large</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2001/02</p></td><td><p>5,086</p></td><td><p>29</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2002/03</p></td><td><p>8,406</p></td><td><p>29</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2003/04</p></td><td><p>11,268</p></td><td><p>55</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2004/05</p></td><td><p>11,171</p></td><td><p>30</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2005/06</p></td><td><p>11,450</p></td><td><p>73</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2006/07</p></td><td><p>13,411</p></td><td><p>60</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2007/08</p></td><td><p>13,252</p></td><td><p>65</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2008/09</p></td><td><p>13,467</p></td><td><p>76</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2009/10</p></td><td><p>15,004</p></td><td><p>89</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010/11</p></td><td><p>15,631</p></td><td><p>79</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2011/12</p></td><td><p>16,591</p></td><td><p>118</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2012/13</p></td><td><p>16,307</p></td><td><p>127</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Apr-September 2013</p></td><td><p>8,847</p></td><td><p>146</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Data on the number of releases on temporary release licence (ROTL) since 1995-6, and temporary release failures since 2004-5 are published in the NOMS Prison Performance Digest. This may be found at the following web address:</p><p> </p><p><a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/225234/prison-performance-digest-12-13.xls" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/225234/prison-performance-digest-12-13.xls</a></p><p> </p><p>The most recent data were published on 25 July 2013.</p><p> </p><p>Data on ROTL and recorded temporary release failures are shown in the table below.</p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p>Financial year</p></td><td><p>Release on temporary licence</p></td><td><p>Recorded temporary release failures</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2001/02</p></td><td><p>273,569</p></td><td><p>293</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2002/03</p></td><td><p>294,112</p></td><td><p>312</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2003/04</p></td><td><p>342,742</p></td><td><p>395</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2004/05</p></td><td><p>397,969</p></td><td><p>366</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2005/06</p></td><td><p>407,199</p></td><td><p>360</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2006/07</p></td><td><p>409,139</p></td><td><p>306</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2007/08</p></td><td><p>434,728</p></td><td><p>248</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2008/09</p></td><td><p>431,351</p></td><td><p>277</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2009/10</p></td><td><p>419,016</p></td><td><p>274</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010/11</p></td><td><p>431,178</p></td><td><p>281</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2011/12</p></td><td><p>488,158</p></td><td><p>404</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2012/13</p></td><td><p>518,862</p></td><td><p>431</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p>Not all temporary release failures are recorded on central administrative systems. Those that are not recorded centrally are more likely to be low-level failures including, for example, returning with unauthorised possessions. These failures are managed locally. Where failures are recorded, the central administrative system only allows for one reason to be recorded; where it is a failure to return this takes priority.</p><p> </p><p>The number of prisoners unlawfully at large (UAL) having failed to return from release on temporary licence for each financial year since 2004/05 is shown in the table below.</p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p>Financial year</p></td><td><p>Number of prisoners who remain UAL following failure to return from ROTL</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2004/05</p></td><td><p>15</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2005/06</p></td><td><p>10</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2006/07</p></td><td><p>10</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2007/08</p></td><td><p>4</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2008/09</p></td><td><p>5</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2009/10</p></td><td><p>7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010/11</p></td><td><p>3</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2011/12</p></td><td><p>7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2012/13</p></td><td><p>7</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p>To provide the number of temporary release failures where the prisoner has failed to return and remains unlawfully at large prior to this date would require the manual interrogation of 1,000 temporary release records which could be done only at disproportionate cost.</p><p> </p><p>These figures have all been drawn from live administrative data systems which may be amended at any time. Although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large scale recording system.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency Kenilworth and Southam more like this
star this property answering member printed Jeremy Wright more like this
star this property grouped question UIN 188583 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-04-07T12:00:00.00Zmore like thismore than 2014-04-07T12:00:00.00Z
star this property answering member
1560
star this property label Biography information for Jeremy Wright more like this
star this property tabling member
1577
unstar this property label Biography information for Sadiq Khan remove filter