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1124188
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-01more like thismore than 2019-05-01
star this property answering body
Home Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 1 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Home Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Home Office more like this
star this property hansard heading Animal Experiments more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what progress his Department is making on reducing the use of animals in experiments and replacing such experiments with machine learning. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Newcastle-under-Lyme more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Paul Farrelly more like this
star this property uin 249864 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false remove filter
star this property date of answer less than 2019-05-08more like thismore than 2019-05-08
unstar this property answer text <p>The Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 requires project licence holders to ensure that their programme of work does not involve any regulated procedures for which there is a scientifically satisfactory alternative method or testing strategy that does not entail the use of a protected animal.</p><p><br>The government is committed to the replacement, reduction, and refinement of the use of animals in research - the ‘3Rs’. Implementing the 3Rs requires that, in every research proposal, animals are replaced with non-animal alternatives wherever possible; that the number of animals is reduced to the minimum needed to achieve the results sought; and that, for those animals which must be used, procedures are refined as much as possible to minimise their suffering.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Wyre and Preston North more like this
star this property answering member printed Mr Ben Wallace more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-08T13:57:08.663Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-08T13:57:08.663Z
star this property answering member
1539
star this property label Biography information for Mr Ben Wallace more like this
star this property tabling member
1436
unstar this property label Biography information for Paul Farrelly remove filter
1024789
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2018-12-13more like thismore than 2018-12-13
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property hansard heading Ovarian Cancer: Staffordshire more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to (a) increase early diagnosis rates for ovarian cancer and (b) increase access to treatment for ovarian cancer in specialist centres in Staffordshire. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Newcastle-under-Lyme more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Paul Farrelly more like this
star this property uin 202081 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false remove filter
star this property date of answer less than 2018-12-18more like thismore than 2018-12-18
unstar this property answer text <p>Public Health England (PHE) has run a number of ‘Be Clear on Cancer’ campaigns to help improve early detection of cancer including ovarian cancer. In 2014 PHE ran a pilot regional ovarian cancer campaign in the North West of England. In 2017, PHE ran a pilot campaign in the East and West Midlands which focussed on a range of abdominal symptoms, such as diarrhoea, bloating and discomfort that can be indicative of a number of cancers, including ovarian cancer. NHS England has invested over £200 million between 2017 and 2019, supporting Cancer Alliances to accelerate diagnosis and enhance quality of life.</p><p> </p><p>Staffordshire clinical commissioning groups commission diagnostic services for ovarian cancer fully in line with National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines across the whole sustainability and transformation partnership.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Winchester more like this
star this property answering member printed Steve Brine more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2018-12-18T17:04:54.847Zmore like thismore than 2018-12-18T17:04:54.847Z
star this property answering member
4067
star this property label Biography information for Steve Brine more like this
star this property tabling member
1436
unstar this property label Biography information for Paul Farrelly remove filter
1046830
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-01-23more like thismore than 2019-01-23
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property hansard heading Lung Diseases more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to (a) detect and diagnose lung disease earlier and (b) support people with chronic respiratory conditions to manage their health. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Newcastle-under-Lyme more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Paul Farrelly more like this
star this property uin 211682 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false remove filter
star this property date of answer less than 2019-01-28more like thismore than 2019-01-28
unstar this property answer text <p>The Government is committed to improving the lives of those with respiratory disease.</p><p>Respiratory disease is a clinical priority within the recently published NHS Long Term Plan. This has the overarching objective of improving outcomes for people with respiratory disease. The Long Term Plan sets out how the National Health Service will take action in a number of areas. This includes expanding programmes that support earlier diagnosis of respiratory disease including the pioneering lung health checks trialled in Manchester and Liverpool; increasing access to proven treatments such as pulmonary rehabilitation (a structured exercise and education programme for those with chronic respiratory disease and breathlessness); and improving support for those with chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma to receive and use the correct medications.</p><p>The NHS Long Term Plan will build on a range of existing national initiatives focussed on the diagnosis and treatment of respiratory disease, some of which are detailed below.</p><p>The NHS Outcomes Framework sets out the Department’s priority areas for the NHS, and includes reducing deaths from respiratory disease as a key indicator.</p><p>The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) publishes quality standards that define best practice and areas in need of improvement for a range of respiratory illnesses including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, with the aim of raising the standard of care that people with these conditions receive. NICE quality standards cover both diagnosis and treatment.</p><p>The NHS RightCare COPD pathway is being rolled out nationally through clinical commissioning groups and defines the core components of an optimal service for people with COPD. This includes timely access to pulmonary rehabilitation as part of the optimal treatment pathway.</p><p>The Department and NHS England are supportive of the National Asthma and COPD Audit Programme. Launched in March 2018 and led by the Royal College of Physicians, this programme aims to improve quality of care, services, and clinical outcomes for patients with asthma and COPD by collecting and providing data on a range of indicators.</p><p>Furthermore, NHS England commissions treatments for rare or complex respiratory conditions through the Specialised Respiratory Clinical Reference Group, which is chaired by Professor Mike Morgan. This includes specialist treatment for pulmonary hypertension, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and severe asthma among other conditions.</p><p>The Department also funds research on respiratory illnesses through the National Institute for Health Research.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Winchester more like this
star this property answering member printed Steve Brine more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-01-28T17:16:04.893Zmore like thismore than 2019-01-28T17:16:04.893Z
star this property answering member
4067
star this property label Biography information for Steve Brine more like this
star this property tabling member
1436
unstar this property label Biography information for Paul Farrelly remove filter
1046835
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-01-23more like thismore than 2019-01-23
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property hansard heading Lung Diseases more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much funding will be allocated to the respiratory programme set out in the NHS Long Term Plan. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Newcastle-under-Lyme more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Paul Farrelly more like this
star this property uin 211683 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false remove filter
star this property date of answer less than 2019-01-28more like thismore than 2019-01-28
unstar this property answer text <p>NHS England is not able to release exact figures at present.</p><p>The National Implementation Framework, to be published in the spring, will provide further information on how the Long Term Plan will be implemented. Further details, based on local health system five year plans, will be brought together in a detailed national implementation plan in the autumn.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Winchester more like this
star this property answering member printed Steve Brine more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-01-28T17:14:13.36Zmore like thismore than 2019-01-28T17:14:13.36Z
star this property answering member
4067
star this property label Biography information for Steve Brine more like this
star this property tabling member
1436
unstar this property label Biography information for Paul Farrelly remove filter
1064754
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-02-21more like thismore than 2019-02-21
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property hansard heading Cervical Cancer: Screening more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether it remains his policy that the NHS is the primary provider for cervical cytology screening in England. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Newcastle-under-Lyme more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Paul Farrelly more like this
star this property uin 224307 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false remove filter
star this property date of answer less than 2019-02-26more like thismore than 2019-02-26
unstar this property answer text <p>The National Health Service will remain the primary provider for cervical cytology screening in England and cervical screening remains part of the General Medical Services contract.</p><p> </p><p>In November 2015, the UK National Screening Committee recommended that human papillomavirus (HPV) screening should replace the currently used liquid based cytology test as the primary screening for cervical disease.</p><p> </p><p>Following a review of its delivery strategy, NHS England commenced a one-stage procurement process to reconfigure provider laboratories to support the roll-out of HPV primary screening into the NHS Cervical Cancer Screening Programme in England. HPV primary screening is due to be rolled out in 2019.</p><p> </p><p>Once full implementation is achieved, all samples will be tested for HPV which causes more than 99% of cervical cancers. This could prevent around 600 cancers a year.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Winchester more like this
star this property answering member printed Steve Brine more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-02-26T15:39:34.563Zmore like thismore than 2019-02-26T15:39:34.563Z
star this property answering member
4067
star this property label Biography information for Steve Brine more like this
star this property tabling member
1436
unstar this property label Biography information for Paul Farrelly remove filter
1086610
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-03-11more like thismore than 2019-03-11
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property hansard heading Asthma more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the finding in Asthma UK's report, The Reality of Asthma Care in the UK - Annual Asthma Survey 2018 that two-thirds of patients do not receive a follow-up appointment with their GP after receiving emergency care, if he will take steps tackle the reasons for that finding. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Newcastle-under-Lyme more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Paul Farrelly more like this
star this property uin 230635 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false remove filter
star this property date of answer less than 2019-03-14more like thismore than 2019-03-14
unstar this property answer text <p>Respiratory disease is a clinical priority within the recently published NHS Long Term Plan. The Plan has the overarching objective of improving outcomes for people with respiratory disease, including asthma.</p><p> </p><p>NHS England supports the national asthma audit programme that provides data on a range of indicators to show improvements and opportunities for further improvements in asthma outcomes.</p><p> </p><p>The recently published general practitioner (GP) contract has made improvements to the Quality and Outcomes framework through the introduction of quality improvement modules. This replaces the current system of exception reporting with a personalised care adjustment approach, which will better reflect individual clinical situations and patients’ wishes. NHS England and GPC England have agreed to an ongoing programme of indicator review in key priority areas, including asthma in 2019/20. Through the GP contract and Primary Care Networks, clinical pharmacists will take responsibility for the care management of patients with chronic diseases and undertake clinical medication reviews to proactively manage people with complex polypharmacy, and those with multiple long term conditions, in particular people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma.</p><p> </p><p>National programmes such NHS RightCare are using leading edge medical evidence and practical support to help local health economies to make best use of their resources and using tested evidence based processes to make sustainable improvements to patient care. As part of this programme, a RightCare asthma pathway will be published in the spring which will outline the optimal pathway for patients, including the need for follow-up appointments following emergency care.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Winchester more like this
star this property answering member printed Steve Brine more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-03-14T17:01:30.643Zmore like thismore than 2019-03-14T17:01:30.643Z
star this property answering member
4067
star this property label Biography information for Steve Brine more like this
star this property tabling member
1436
unstar this property label Biography information for Paul Farrelly remove filter
1091017
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-03-18more like thismore than 2019-03-18
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property hansard heading Dialysis Machines more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the equity of access to home-based dialysis services in England; and if he will make a statement. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Newcastle-under-Lyme more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Paul Farrelly more like this
star this property uin 233465 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false remove filter
star this property date of answer less than 2019-03-21more like thismore than 2019-03-21
unstar this property answer text <p>NHS England commissions dialysis services at a national level as a specialised service, setting out what providers should have in place to deliver dialysis care, including at home, as part of its remit to deliver specialised services. National Commissioning supports equity of access to high quality dialysis care. The service delivery contract sets out that the principle should be that home haemodialysis should always be an option for patients and that solutions should be sought to overcoming barriers that might prevent this. Decisions should be made on an individual basis but in general, patients suitable for home haemodialysis will be those who:</p><p>- have the ability and motivation to learn to carry out the process and the commitment to maintain treatment;</p><p>- are stable on dialysis;</p><p>- are free of complications and significant concomitant disease that would render home haemodialysis unsuitable or unsafe;</p><p>- have good functioning vascular access;</p><p>- have a carer who has (or carers who have) also made an informed decision to assist with the haemodialysis unless the individual is able to manage on his or her own; and</p><p>- have suitable space and facilities or an area that could be adapted within their home environment.</p><p><strong> </strong></p><p>NHS England’s renal services specifications can be found at the following link:</p><p> </p><p><a href="http://www.england.nhs.uk/commissioning/spec-services/npc-crg/group-a/a06/" target="_blank">www.england.nhs.uk/commissioning/spec-services/npc-crg/group-a/a06/</a></p><p> </p><p>NHS England Specialised Services use the Renal Registry Annual Report and data to support work with local dialysis services so they are aware where variation exists so this can be considered and addressed.</p><p> </p><p>The Atlas of variation, published by Public Health England in 2015, showed that for clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) in England, the percentage of dialysis patients who were receiving dialysis in the home (home haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis combined) ranged from 4.1% to 44.0% (10.6-fold variation). When the seven CCGs with the highest percentages and the seven CCGs with the lowest percentages are excluded, the range is 7.6–33.7%, and the variation is 4.4-fold. Variation by parliamentary constituency is not available.</p><p> </p><p>Reasons for the degree of variation observed include differences in:</p><p> </p><p>- access to, and timely assessment by, a specialist kidney unit – working with patients to help them decide between treatments takes time, but in some areas 30% of patients are not known to their kidney team for even 90 days before they start renal replacement therapy;</p><p>- access to a multi-professional team, including staff who regularly support patients undertaking home dialysis; and</p><p>- levels of support for people undertaking home dialysis to help them maintain their independence, including access to respite in-centre dialysis.</p><p> </p><p>The Atlas can be found at the following link:</p><p> </p><p><a href="https://fingertips.phe.org.uk/profile/atlas-of-variation" target="_blank">https://fingertips.phe.org.uk/profile/atlas-of-variation</a></p><p><strong> </strong></p><p>According to the latest data from the UK Renal Registry (UKRR), there were 1,195 patients receiving home dialysis in the United Kingdom in 2014, 1,175 patients in 2015; and 1,256 patients in 2016. The UKRR collects, analyses and reports on data from 71 adult and 13 paediatric renal centres. Participation is mandated in England, via the national services specification published by NHS England.</p><p> </p><p>The latest report from the UK Renal Registry can be found at the following link:</p><p> </p><p><a href="http://www.renalreg.org/publications-reports/" target="_blank">www.renalreg.org/publications-reports/</a></p><p><strong> </strong></p><p>No specific assessment of the cost to the National Health Service of the provision of dialysis services in a patient’s home compared to a clinical setting has been undertaken. In its assessment of the evidence regarding cost, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) set out in its guideline, ‘Renal Replacement Therapy and Conservative Management’, published in October 2018, that there is uncertainty in current UK dialysis costs, but they may be lower at home. The committee acknowledged that these treatments can have very different effects on lifestyle and recommended patient choice. The NICE guideline can be found at the following link:</p><p><strong> </strong></p><p><a href="http://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng107/resources/renal-replacement-therapy-and-conservative-management-pdf-66141542991301" target="_blank">www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng107/resources/renal-replacement-therapy-and-conservative-management-pdf-66141542991301</a></p><p><strong> </strong></p><p>Regarding the benefits of home dialysis, there is good evidence that home dialysis therapies offer advantages for suitable patients. The limitations of thrice weekly standard in-centre haemodialysis have been recognised in recent years. However, it is very difficult to separate the effect of different case mix, the most up to date and comprehensive data does not show a survival difference between patients who received more frequent versus thrice weekly (standard regimen) haemodialysis.</p><p> </p><p>The advantage of self-care haemodialysis includes not only those related to control and convenience but also the opportunity to conduct more frequent or longer sessions to optimise health prospects. The introduction of smaller more portable haemodialysis machines also provides opportunity for travel for employment or holidays. Furthermore, these therapies are cost effective in the UK when compared with hospital treatments and have been demonstrated to be safe. Information regarding a reduction in travel times and reliance on other medicines is not available.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency Winchester more like this
star this property answering member printed Steve Brine more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
233478 more like this
233479 more like this
233480 more like this
233481 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-03-21T16:14:41.657Zmore like thismore than 2019-03-21T16:14:41.657Z
star this property answering member
4067
star this property label Biography information for Steve Brine more like this
star this property tabling member
1436
unstar this property label Biography information for Paul Farrelly remove filter
1091018
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-03-18more like thismore than 2019-03-18
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property hansard heading Kidney Diseases more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, which stakeholder groups representing patients in need of kidney care his Department has engaged with in relation to the prevention Green Paper. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Newcastle-under-Lyme more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Paul Farrelly more like this
star this property uin 233466 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false remove filter
star this property date of answer less than 2019-03-21more like thismore than 2019-03-21
unstar this property answer text <p>The Department has not, in the context of work on the prevention Green paper, engaged specifically with groups representing patients of kidney care. However, conversations on this may have taken place elsewhere in the Department, outside the Green Paper. The Green Paper will consider options for preventing a wide range of physical and mental health problems and seek views on what actions are most needed.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Winchester more like this
star this property answering member printed Steve Brine more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-03-21T16:06:44.02Zmore like thismore than 2019-03-21T16:06:44.02Z
star this property answering member
4067
star this property label Biography information for Steve Brine more like this
star this property tabling member
1436
unstar this property label Biography information for Paul Farrelly remove filter
1091042
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-03-18more like thismore than 2019-03-18
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property hansard heading Dialysis Machines more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the availability of home-based dialysis services across each (a) Clinical Commissioning Group area and (b) Parliamentary constituency. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Newcastle-under-Lyme more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Paul Farrelly more like this
star this property uin 233478 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false remove filter
star this property date of answer less than 2019-03-21more like thismore than 2019-03-21
unstar this property answer text <p>NHS England commissions dialysis services at a national level as a specialised service, setting out what providers should have in place to deliver dialysis care, including at home, as part of its remit to deliver specialised services. National Commissioning supports equity of access to high quality dialysis care. The service delivery contract sets out that the principle should be that home haemodialysis should always be an option for patients and that solutions should be sought to overcoming barriers that might prevent this. Decisions should be made on an individual basis but in general, patients suitable for home haemodialysis will be those who:</p><p>- have the ability and motivation to learn to carry out the process and the commitment to maintain treatment;</p><p>- are stable on dialysis;</p><p>- are free of complications and significant concomitant disease that would render home haemodialysis unsuitable or unsafe;</p><p>- have good functioning vascular access;</p><p>- have a carer who has (or carers who have) also made an informed decision to assist with the haemodialysis unless the individual is able to manage on his or her own; and</p><p>- have suitable space and facilities or an area that could be adapted within their home environment.</p><p><strong> </strong></p><p>NHS England’s renal services specifications can be found at the following link:</p><p> </p><p><a href="http://www.england.nhs.uk/commissioning/spec-services/npc-crg/group-a/a06/" target="_blank">www.england.nhs.uk/commissioning/spec-services/npc-crg/group-a/a06/</a></p><p> </p><p>NHS England Specialised Services use the Renal Registry Annual Report and data to support work with local dialysis services so they are aware where variation exists so this can be considered and addressed.</p><p> </p><p>The Atlas of variation, published by Public Health England in 2015, showed that for clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) in England, the percentage of dialysis patients who were receiving dialysis in the home (home haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis combined) ranged from 4.1% to 44.0% (10.6-fold variation). When the seven CCGs with the highest percentages and the seven CCGs with the lowest percentages are excluded, the range is 7.6–33.7%, and the variation is 4.4-fold. Variation by parliamentary constituency is not available.</p><p> </p><p>Reasons for the degree of variation observed include differences in:</p><p> </p><p>- access to, and timely assessment by, a specialist kidney unit – working with patients to help them decide between treatments takes time, but in some areas 30% of patients are not known to their kidney team for even 90 days before they start renal replacement therapy;</p><p>- access to a multi-professional team, including staff who regularly support patients undertaking home dialysis; and</p><p>- levels of support for people undertaking home dialysis to help them maintain their independence, including access to respite in-centre dialysis.</p><p> </p><p>The Atlas can be found at the following link:</p><p> </p><p><a href="https://fingertips.phe.org.uk/profile/atlas-of-variation" target="_blank">https://fingertips.phe.org.uk/profile/atlas-of-variation</a></p><p><strong> </strong></p><p>According to the latest data from the UK Renal Registry (UKRR), there were 1,195 patients receiving home dialysis in the United Kingdom in 2014, 1,175 patients in 2015; and 1,256 patients in 2016. The UKRR collects, analyses and reports on data from 71 adult and 13 paediatric renal centres. Participation is mandated in England, via the national services specification published by NHS England.</p><p> </p><p>The latest report from the UK Renal Registry can be found at the following link:</p><p> </p><p><a href="http://www.renalreg.org/publications-reports/" target="_blank">www.renalreg.org/publications-reports/</a></p><p><strong> </strong></p><p>No specific assessment of the cost to the National Health Service of the provision of dialysis services in a patient’s home compared to a clinical setting has been undertaken. In its assessment of the evidence regarding cost, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) set out in its guideline, ‘Renal Replacement Therapy and Conservative Management’, published in October 2018, that there is uncertainty in current UK dialysis costs, but they may be lower at home. The committee acknowledged that these treatments can have very different effects on lifestyle and recommended patient choice. The NICE guideline can be found at the following link:</p><p><strong> </strong></p><p><a href="http://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng107/resources/renal-replacement-therapy-and-conservative-management-pdf-66141542991301" target="_blank">www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng107/resources/renal-replacement-therapy-and-conservative-management-pdf-66141542991301</a></p><p><strong> </strong></p><p>Regarding the benefits of home dialysis, there is good evidence that home dialysis therapies offer advantages for suitable patients. The limitations of thrice weekly standard in-centre haemodialysis have been recognised in recent years. However, it is very difficult to separate the effect of different case mix, the most up to date and comprehensive data does not show a survival difference between patients who received more frequent versus thrice weekly (standard regimen) haemodialysis.</p><p> </p><p>The advantage of self-care haemodialysis includes not only those related to control and convenience but also the opportunity to conduct more frequent or longer sessions to optimise health prospects. The introduction of smaller more portable haemodialysis machines also provides opportunity for travel for employment or holidays. Furthermore, these therapies are cost effective in the UK when compared with hospital treatments and have been demonstrated to be safe. Information regarding a reduction in travel times and reliance on other medicines is not available.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency Winchester more like this
star this property answering member printed Steve Brine more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
233465 more like this
233479 more like this
233480 more like this
233481 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-03-21T16:14:41.737Zmore like thismore than 2019-03-21T16:14:41.737Z
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4067
star this property label Biography information for Steve Brine more like this
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1436
unstar this property label Biography information for Paul Farrelly remove filter
1091047
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-03-18more like thismore than 2019-03-18
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Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property hansard heading Dialysis Machines more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
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25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of patients receiving home-based dialysis in place of hospital-based dialysis in each of the past three years. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Newcastle-under-Lyme more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Paul Farrelly more like this
star this property uin 233479 more like this
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answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false remove filter
star this property date of answer less than 2019-03-21more like thismore than 2019-03-21
unstar this property answer text <p>NHS England commissions dialysis services at a national level as a specialised service, setting out what providers should have in place to deliver dialysis care, including at home, as part of its remit to deliver specialised services. National Commissioning supports equity of access to high quality dialysis care. The service delivery contract sets out that the principle should be that home haemodialysis should always be an option for patients and that solutions should be sought to overcoming barriers that might prevent this. Decisions should be made on an individual basis but in general, patients suitable for home haemodialysis will be those who:</p><p>- have the ability and motivation to learn to carry out the process and the commitment to maintain treatment;</p><p>- are stable on dialysis;</p><p>- are free of complications and significant concomitant disease that would render home haemodialysis unsuitable or unsafe;</p><p>- have good functioning vascular access;</p><p>- have a carer who has (or carers who have) also made an informed decision to assist with the haemodialysis unless the individual is able to manage on his or her own; and</p><p>- have suitable space and facilities or an area that could be adapted within their home environment.</p><p><strong> </strong></p><p>NHS England’s renal services specifications can be found at the following link:</p><p> </p><p><a href="http://www.england.nhs.uk/commissioning/spec-services/npc-crg/group-a/a06/" target="_blank">www.england.nhs.uk/commissioning/spec-services/npc-crg/group-a/a06/</a></p><p> </p><p>NHS England Specialised Services use the Renal Registry Annual Report and data to support work with local dialysis services so they are aware where variation exists so this can be considered and addressed.</p><p> </p><p>The Atlas of variation, published by Public Health England in 2015, showed that for clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) in England, the percentage of dialysis patients who were receiving dialysis in the home (home haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis combined) ranged from 4.1% to 44.0% (10.6-fold variation). When the seven CCGs with the highest percentages and the seven CCGs with the lowest percentages are excluded, the range is 7.6–33.7%, and the variation is 4.4-fold. Variation by parliamentary constituency is not available.</p><p> </p><p>Reasons for the degree of variation observed include differences in:</p><p> </p><p>- access to, and timely assessment by, a specialist kidney unit – working with patients to help them decide between treatments takes time, but in some areas 30% of patients are not known to their kidney team for even 90 days before they start renal replacement therapy;</p><p>- access to a multi-professional team, including staff who regularly support patients undertaking home dialysis; and</p><p>- levels of support for people undertaking home dialysis to help them maintain their independence, including access to respite in-centre dialysis.</p><p> </p><p>The Atlas can be found at the following link:</p><p> </p><p><a href="https://fingertips.phe.org.uk/profile/atlas-of-variation" target="_blank">https://fingertips.phe.org.uk/profile/atlas-of-variation</a></p><p><strong> </strong></p><p>According to the latest data from the UK Renal Registry (UKRR), there were 1,195 patients receiving home dialysis in the United Kingdom in 2014, 1,175 patients in 2015; and 1,256 patients in 2016. The UKRR collects, analyses and reports on data from 71 adult and 13 paediatric renal centres. Participation is mandated in England, via the national services specification published by NHS England.</p><p> </p><p>The latest report from the UK Renal Registry can be found at the following link:</p><p> </p><p><a href="http://www.renalreg.org/publications-reports/" target="_blank">www.renalreg.org/publications-reports/</a></p><p><strong> </strong></p><p>No specific assessment of the cost to the National Health Service of the provision of dialysis services in a patient’s home compared to a clinical setting has been undertaken. In its assessment of the evidence regarding cost, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) set out in its guideline, ‘Renal Replacement Therapy and Conservative Management’, published in October 2018, that there is uncertainty in current UK dialysis costs, but they may be lower at home. The committee acknowledged that these treatments can have very different effects on lifestyle and recommended patient choice. The NICE guideline can be found at the following link:</p><p><strong> </strong></p><p><a href="http://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng107/resources/renal-replacement-therapy-and-conservative-management-pdf-66141542991301" target="_blank">www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng107/resources/renal-replacement-therapy-and-conservative-management-pdf-66141542991301</a></p><p><strong> </strong></p><p>Regarding the benefits of home dialysis, there is good evidence that home dialysis therapies offer advantages for suitable patients. The limitations of thrice weekly standard in-centre haemodialysis have been recognised in recent years. However, it is very difficult to separate the effect of different case mix, the most up to date and comprehensive data does not show a survival difference between patients who received more frequent versus thrice weekly (standard regimen) haemodialysis.</p><p> </p><p>The advantage of self-care haemodialysis includes not only those related to control and convenience but also the opportunity to conduct more frequent or longer sessions to optimise health prospects. The introduction of smaller more portable haemodialysis machines also provides opportunity for travel for employment or holidays. Furthermore, these therapies are cost effective in the UK when compared with hospital treatments and have been demonstrated to be safe. Information regarding a reduction in travel times and reliance on other medicines is not available.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency Winchester more like this
star this property answering member printed Steve Brine more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
233465 more like this
233478 more like this
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star this property question first answered
less than 2019-03-21T16:14:41.797Zmore like thismore than 2019-03-21T16:14:41.797Z
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star this property label Biography information for Steve Brine more like this
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1436
unstar this property label Biography information for Paul Farrelly remove filter