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347257
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-05-28more like thismore than 2015-05-28
answering body
Home Office more like this
answering dept id 1 more like this
answering dept short name Home Office more like this
answering dept sort name Home Office more like this
hansard heading Offences against Children more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent progress has been made by investigations into cases of historical child abuse. more like this
tabling member constituency Coventry South more like this
tabling member printed
Mr Jim Cunningham more like this
uin 326 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-06-02more like thismore than 2015-06-02
answer text <p>No case of child abuse is ‘historical’ for victims and survivors. They must live with the consequences of their abuse each and every day of their lives. The Independent Panel Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse has been set up to determine whether state and non-state institutions take, and have taken, seriously their duty of care to protect children from sexual abuse within England and Wales. Any specific allegation to the Inquiry will, where necessary, be referred to law enforcement bodies for consideration for criminal investigation. The Home Office has funded Operation Hydrant, which is the national policing response to the oversight and co-ordination of all child abuse investigations concerning persons of public prominence or those offences which have taken place in institutional settings. The day-to-day investigation into cases of child sexual abuse, including abuse that has taken place in the past, is an operational matter for the police and law enforcement.</p> more like this
answering member constituency Staffordshire Moorlands remove filter
answering member printed Karen Bradley more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-06-02T14:10:45.443Zmore like thismore than 2015-06-02T14:10:45.443Z
answering member
4110
label Biography information for Karen Bradley more like this
tabling member
308
label Biography information for Mr Jim Cunningham remove filter
348873
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-06-08more like thismore than 2015-06-08
answering body
Home Office more like this
answering dept id 1 more like this
answering dept short name Home Office more like this
answering dept sort name Home Office more like this
hansard heading Vetting more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment she has made of the appropriateness of the length of time taken to process Disclosure and Barring Service checks; and if she will make a statement. more like this
tabling member constituency Coventry South more like this
tabling member printed
Mr Jim Cunningham more like this
uin 1466 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-06-11more like thismore than 2015-06-11
answer text <p>The Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) receives around 4 million disclosure applications a year and provides the Home Office with monthly updates on the length of time taken to process disclosure checks. Latest figures relating to May 2015 show that 94.6% of disclosure applications were processed within 56 days against a DBS service standard to issue 95% of all disclosures within this time. Most disclosure applications are processed in a shorter timescale and, in May 2015, 87.3% of applications were processed within 21 days. The average time taken to process applications nationally in May 2015 was 14.2 days and in the West Midlands 24.7 days.</p><p>A key aspect of DBS administration is to ensure that disclosure checks are both accurate and completed within service standard timescales. In the small proportion of cases where checks have not been completed within these timescales, the DBS is expected to take the necessary steps to progress the case including, as appropriate, working with the police and other parties involved in the checking process.</p>
answering member constituency Staffordshire Moorlands remove filter
answering member printed Karen Bradley more like this
grouped question UIN 1467 more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-06-11T13:29:11.543Zmore like thismore than 2015-06-11T13:29:11.543Z
answering member
4110
label Biography information for Karen Bradley more like this
tabling member
308
label Biography information for Mr Jim Cunningham remove filter
348874
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-06-08more like thismore than 2015-06-08
answering body
Home Office more like this
answering dept id 1 more like this
answering dept short name Home Office more like this
answering dept sort name Home Office more like this
hansard heading Vetting more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate her Department has made of the average length of time taken to process Disclosure and Barring Service checks (a) in the West Midlands and (b) nationally. more like this
tabling member constituency Coventry South more like this
tabling member printed
Mr Jim Cunningham more like this
uin 1467 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-06-11more like thismore than 2015-06-11
answer text <p>The Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) receives around 4 million disclosure applications a year and provides the Home Office with monthly updates on the length of time taken to process disclosure checks. Latest figures relating to May 2015 show that 94.6% of disclosure applications were processed within 56 days against a DBS service standard to issue 95% of all disclosures within this time. Most disclosure applications are processed in a shorter timescale and, in May 2015, 87.3% of applications were processed within 21 days. The average time taken to process applications nationally in May 2015 was 14.2 days and in the West Midlands 24.7 days.</p><p>A key aspect of DBS administration is to ensure that disclosure checks are both accurate and completed within service standard timescales. In the small proportion of cases where checks have not been completed within these timescales, the DBS is expected to take the necessary steps to progress the case including, as appropriate, working with the police and other parties involved in the checking process.</p>
answering member constituency Staffordshire Moorlands remove filter
answering member printed Karen Bradley more like this
grouped question UIN 1466 more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-06-11T13:29:11.413Zmore like thismore than 2015-06-11T13:29:11.413Z
answering member
4110
label Biography information for Karen Bradley more like this
tabling member
308
label Biography information for Mr Jim Cunningham remove filter
383913
registered interest false more like this
date remove maximum value filtermore like thismore than 2015-06-18
answering body
Home Office more like this
answering dept id 1 more like this
answering dept short name Home Office more like this
answering dept sort name Home Office more like this
hansard heading Vetting more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 11 June 2015 to Question 1466, what additional resources her Department plans to make available to ensure that all Disclosure and Barring Service checks are completed on time nationally in the next 12 months. more like this
tabling member constituency Coventry South more like this
tabling member printed
Mr Jim Cunningham more like this
uin 3256 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-06-23more like thismore than 2015-06-23
answer text <p>The Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) operates on a full cost-recovery basis and is expected to make neither a surplus nor a loss. The DBS provides funding to local police forces to process disclosure applications that require local police intelligence checks. In the small proportion of cases where checks are not completed within normal performance standards, the DBS is taking steps to improve performance, working with the police and other parties.</p> more like this
answering member constituency Staffordshire Moorlands remove filter
answering member printed Karen Bradley more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-06-23T15:20:32.06Zmore like thismore than 2015-06-23T15:20:32.06Z
answering member
4110
label Biography information for Karen Bradley more like this
tabling member
308
label Biography information for Mr Jim Cunningham remove filter