Linked Data API

Show Search Form

Search Results

670684
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-01-10more like thismore than 2017-01-10
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Apprentices: Scotland more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the revenue to be raised from the Apprenticeship Levy from business in Scotland in (a) 2017-18, (b) 2018-19 and (c) 2019-20. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Livingston more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Hannah Bardell more like this
star this property uin 59491 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove maximum value filtermore like thismore than 2017-01-16
unstar this property answer text <p>The apprenticeship levy will apply across the UK and will be collected from employers on a UK wide basis. The expected yield for the apprenticeship levy is published in table C.5: ‘Current Receipts’, in the Autumn Statement 2016 document available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/571559/autumn_statement_2016_web.pdf</p><p> </p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Battersea more like this
star this property answering member printed Jane Ellison more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-01-16T16:20:44.22Zmore like thismore than 2017-01-16T16:20:44.22Z
unstar this property answering member
3918
star this property label Biography information for Jane Ellison more like this
star this property tabling member
4486
unstar this property label Biography information for Hannah Bardell remove filter
506284
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2016-04-08more like thismore than 2016-04-08
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Students: Loans more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what discussions he has had with his counterparts in the devolved administrations on the Government's change to the discount rate applied to student loans. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Livingston more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Hannah Bardell more like this
star this property uin 33215 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2016-04-13more like thismore than 2016-04-13
unstar this property answer text <p>The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) applies HM Treasury’s long term discount rate to calculate the carrying value of English student loans shown in the BIS financial statements.</p><p> </p><p>Loans issued by devolved administrations are shown in their respective financial statements. The accounting treatment and discount rates applied are a matter for them.</p><p> </p><p>HM Treasury is always open to discussion with the devolved administrations about such matters.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Chelsea and Fulham more like this
star this property answering member printed Greg Hands more like this
star this property grouped question UIN 33223 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2016-04-13T10:25:46.083Zmore like thismore than 2016-04-13T10:25:46.083Z
unstar this property answering member
1526
star this property label Biography information for Greg Hands more like this
star this property tabling member
4486
unstar this property label Biography information for Hannah Bardell remove filter
506287
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2016-04-08more like thismore than 2016-04-08
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Students: Loans more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether the change to the discount rate applied to student loans applies to all parts of the UK. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Livingston more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Hannah Bardell more like this
star this property uin 33223 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2016-04-13more like thismore than 2016-04-13
unstar this property answer text <p>The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) applies HM Treasury’s long term discount rate to calculate the carrying value of English student loans shown in the BIS financial statements.</p><p> </p><p>Loans issued by devolved administrations are shown in their respective financial statements. The accounting treatment and discount rates applied are a matter for them.</p><p> </p><p>HM Treasury is always open to discussion with the devolved administrations about such matters.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Chelsea and Fulham more like this
star this property answering member printed Greg Hands more like this
star this property grouped question UIN 33215 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2016-04-13T10:25:46.02Zmore like thismore than 2016-04-13T10:25:46.02Z
unstar this property answering member
1526
star this property label Biography information for Greg Hands more like this
star this property tabling member
4486
unstar this property label Biography information for Hannah Bardell remove filter
475616
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2016-03-15more like thismore than 2016-03-15
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Tobacco: Smuggling more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what process HM Revenue and Customs uses to test for illicit tobacco products. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Livingston more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Hannah Bardell more like this
star this property uin 31255 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2016-03-23more like thismore than 2016-03-23
unstar this property answer text <p>Tobacco products classified as ‘illicit’ in the UK include anything on which duty has not been paid but should have been paid. This includes counterfeit products, brands manufactured legally overseas but not legally sold in the UK, and genuine products originating in the UK and overseas but diverted from legitimate supply chains by criminals. Because of this, HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) officers use a variety of ways to identify illicit product. Testing product authenticity is one mechanism.</p><p> </p><p>To test product authenticity, HMRC uses identifiers required by legislation, for example, Fiscal Marks which manufacturers are required to print on specified tobacco products to show they are UK duty paid, as well as voluntary tools used by the manufacturers. One such voluntary tool is Codentify.</p><p> </p><p>Codentify was developed and introduced by the major tobacco manufacturers on their own initiative through the Digital Coding and Tracking Association (DCTA). HMRC played no part in the development or introduction of the system nor did HMRC require that it be introduced. Codentify codes already feature on packs and are there regardless of any HMRC use of them. HMRC took a policy decision, in line with the commitment to tackle illicit tobacco, to examine whether these existing codes could provide a useful additional tool to help officers authenticate product in the field.</p><p> </p><p>The trial is concerned only with the use of Codentify for product authentication, and no other aspect of the system is being used or evaluated. Codentify requires no specialist equipment or training. Officers are provided with basic guidance and access to an online system. No charge is made for use of the system and, as no procurement was needed, there was no requirement for HMRC to run a tender exercise. As this is a trial only, no Ministerial approval was required or has been sought.</p><p> </p><p>A number of HMRC officers have been given access to the system and trained by HMRC colleagues. The time spent on this activity is minimal and is estimated to be less than one staff year in total.</p><p> </p><p>HMRC has explained the use of Codentify as a potential product authentication tool to colleagues in Border Force and Trading Standards. However, they have not provided training to any officers in those organisations.</p><p> </p><p>The EU Tobacco Products Directive introduces a requirement for a pan European security feature and track and trace systems. The European Commission, working with Member States, is considering proposals and have yet to determine any technical specifications,</p><p> </p><p>HMRC is aware of a wide range of potential track and trace and security feature solutions on the market. They are not evaluating, and, given the current position on the Directive, could not evaluate any products against its requirements. The aspects of Codentify being used are entirely separate from the requirements of the Directive.</p><p> </p><p>In accordance with regulatory requirements, when technical specifications are determined, HMRC will ensure that any evaluation against them ensures no unfair competitive advantage or obstacles to competition.</p>
star this property answering member constituency East Hampshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Damian Hinds more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
31256 more like this
31257 more like this
31258 more like this
31259 more like this
31260 more like this
31261 more like this
31262 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2016-03-23T14:27:39.837Zmore like thismore than 2016-03-23T14:27:39.837Z
unstar this property answering member
3969
star this property label Biography information for Mr Damian Hinds more like this
star this property tabling member
4486
unstar this property label Biography information for Hannah Bardell remove filter
475617
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2016-03-15more like thismore than 2016-03-15
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Tobacco: Smuggling more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, to what extent HM Revenue and Customs is dependent on tobacco manufacturers for the testing illicit tobacco products. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Livingston more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Hannah Bardell more like this
star this property uin 31256 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2016-03-23more like thismore than 2016-03-23
unstar this property answer text <p>Tobacco products classified as ‘illicit’ in the UK include anything on which duty has not been paid but should have been paid. This includes counterfeit products, brands manufactured legally overseas but not legally sold in the UK, and genuine products originating in the UK and overseas but diverted from legitimate supply chains by criminals. Because of this, HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) officers use a variety of ways to identify illicit product. Testing product authenticity is one mechanism.</p><p> </p><p>To test product authenticity, HMRC uses identifiers required by legislation, for example, Fiscal Marks which manufacturers are required to print on specified tobacco products to show they are UK duty paid, as well as voluntary tools used by the manufacturers. One such voluntary tool is Codentify.</p><p> </p><p>Codentify was developed and introduced by the major tobacco manufacturers on their own initiative through the Digital Coding and Tracking Association (DCTA). HMRC played no part in the development or introduction of the system nor did HMRC require that it be introduced. Codentify codes already feature on packs and are there regardless of any HMRC use of them. HMRC took a policy decision, in line with the commitment to tackle illicit tobacco, to examine whether these existing codes could provide a useful additional tool to help officers authenticate product in the field.</p><p> </p><p>The trial is concerned only with the use of Codentify for product authentication, and no other aspect of the system is being used or evaluated. Codentify requires no specialist equipment or training. Officers are provided with basic guidance and access to an online system. No charge is made for use of the system and, as no procurement was needed, there was no requirement for HMRC to run a tender exercise. As this is a trial only, no Ministerial approval was required or has been sought.</p><p> </p><p>A number of HMRC officers have been given access to the system and trained by HMRC colleagues. The time spent on this activity is minimal and is estimated to be less than one staff year in total.</p><p> </p><p>HMRC has explained the use of Codentify as a potential product authentication tool to colleagues in Border Force and Trading Standards. However, they have not provided training to any officers in those organisations.</p><p> </p><p>The EU Tobacco Products Directive introduces a requirement for a pan European security feature and track and trace systems. The European Commission, working with Member States, is considering proposals and have yet to determine any technical specifications,</p><p> </p><p>HMRC is aware of a wide range of potential track and trace and security feature solutions on the market. They are not evaluating, and, given the current position on the Directive, could not evaluate any products against its requirements. The aspects of Codentify being used are entirely separate from the requirements of the Directive.</p><p> </p><p>In accordance with regulatory requirements, when technical specifications are determined, HMRC will ensure that any evaluation against them ensures no unfair competitive advantage or obstacles to competition.</p>
star this property answering member constituency East Hampshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Damian Hinds more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
31255 more like this
31257 more like this
31258 more like this
31259 more like this
31260 more like this
31261 more like this
31262 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2016-03-23T14:27:39.917Zmore like thismore than 2016-03-23T14:27:39.917Z
unstar this property answering member
3969
star this property label Biography information for Mr Damian Hinds more like this
star this property tabling member
4486
unstar this property label Biography information for Hannah Bardell remove filter
475619
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2016-03-15more like thismore than 2016-03-15
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Tobacco: Smuggling more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, for what (a) policy and (b) operational reasons HM Revenue and Customs decided to pilot Codentify as a tobacco product authentication tool. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Livingston more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Hannah Bardell more like this
star this property uin 31257 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2016-03-23more like thismore than 2016-03-23
unstar this property answer text <p>Tobacco products classified as ‘illicit’ in the UK include anything on which duty has not been paid but should have been paid. This includes counterfeit products, brands manufactured legally overseas but not legally sold in the UK, and genuine products originating in the UK and overseas but diverted from legitimate supply chains by criminals. Because of this, HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) officers use a variety of ways to identify illicit product. Testing product authenticity is one mechanism.</p><p> </p><p>To test product authenticity, HMRC uses identifiers required by legislation, for example, Fiscal Marks which manufacturers are required to print on specified tobacco products to show they are UK duty paid, as well as voluntary tools used by the manufacturers. One such voluntary tool is Codentify.</p><p> </p><p>Codentify was developed and introduced by the major tobacco manufacturers on their own initiative through the Digital Coding and Tracking Association (DCTA). HMRC played no part in the development or introduction of the system nor did HMRC require that it be introduced. Codentify codes already feature on packs and are there regardless of any HMRC use of them. HMRC took a policy decision, in line with the commitment to tackle illicit tobacco, to examine whether these existing codes could provide a useful additional tool to help officers authenticate product in the field.</p><p> </p><p>The trial is concerned only with the use of Codentify for product authentication, and no other aspect of the system is being used or evaluated. Codentify requires no specialist equipment or training. Officers are provided with basic guidance and access to an online system. No charge is made for use of the system and, as no procurement was needed, there was no requirement for HMRC to run a tender exercise. As this is a trial only, no Ministerial approval was required or has been sought.</p><p> </p><p>A number of HMRC officers have been given access to the system and trained by HMRC colleagues. The time spent on this activity is minimal and is estimated to be less than one staff year in total.</p><p> </p><p>HMRC has explained the use of Codentify as a potential product authentication tool to colleagues in Border Force and Trading Standards. However, they have not provided training to any officers in those organisations.</p><p> </p><p>The EU Tobacco Products Directive introduces a requirement for a pan European security feature and track and trace systems. The European Commission, working with Member States, is considering proposals and have yet to determine any technical specifications,</p><p> </p><p>HMRC is aware of a wide range of potential track and trace and security feature solutions on the market. They are not evaluating, and, given the current position on the Directive, could not evaluate any products against its requirements. The aspects of Codentify being used are entirely separate from the requirements of the Directive.</p><p> </p><p>In accordance with regulatory requirements, when technical specifications are determined, HMRC will ensure that any evaluation against them ensures no unfair competitive advantage or obstacles to competition.</p>
star this property answering member constituency East Hampshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Damian Hinds more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
31255 more like this
31256 more like this
31258 more like this
31259 more like this
31260 more like this
31261 more like this
31262 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2016-03-23T14:27:39.997Zmore like thismore than 2016-03-23T14:27:39.997Z
unstar this property answering member
3969
star this property label Biography information for Mr Damian Hinds more like this
star this property tabling member
4486
unstar this property label Biography information for Hannah Bardell remove filter
475620
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2016-03-15more like thismore than 2016-03-15
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Tobacco: Smuggling more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, which Ministers were involved in the decision for HM Revenue and Customs to pilot Codentify as a tobacco product authentication tool. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Livingston more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Hannah Bardell more like this
star this property uin 31258 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2016-03-23more like thismore than 2016-03-23
unstar this property answer text <p>Tobacco products classified as ‘illicit’ in the UK include anything on which duty has not been paid but should have been paid. This includes counterfeit products, brands manufactured legally overseas but not legally sold in the UK, and genuine products originating in the UK and overseas but diverted from legitimate supply chains by criminals. Because of this, HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) officers use a variety of ways to identify illicit product. Testing product authenticity is one mechanism.</p><p> </p><p>To test product authenticity, HMRC uses identifiers required by legislation, for example, Fiscal Marks which manufacturers are required to print on specified tobacco products to show they are UK duty paid, as well as voluntary tools used by the manufacturers. One such voluntary tool is Codentify.</p><p> </p><p>Codentify was developed and introduced by the major tobacco manufacturers on their own initiative through the Digital Coding and Tracking Association (DCTA). HMRC played no part in the development or introduction of the system nor did HMRC require that it be introduced. Codentify codes already feature on packs and are there regardless of any HMRC use of them. HMRC took a policy decision, in line with the commitment to tackle illicit tobacco, to examine whether these existing codes could provide a useful additional tool to help officers authenticate product in the field.</p><p> </p><p>The trial is concerned only with the use of Codentify for product authentication, and no other aspect of the system is being used or evaluated. Codentify requires no specialist equipment or training. Officers are provided with basic guidance and access to an online system. No charge is made for use of the system and, as no procurement was needed, there was no requirement for HMRC to run a tender exercise. As this is a trial only, no Ministerial approval was required or has been sought.</p><p> </p><p>A number of HMRC officers have been given access to the system and trained by HMRC colleagues. The time spent on this activity is minimal and is estimated to be less than one staff year in total.</p><p> </p><p>HMRC has explained the use of Codentify as a potential product authentication tool to colleagues in Border Force and Trading Standards. However, they have not provided training to any officers in those organisations.</p><p> </p><p>The EU Tobacco Products Directive introduces a requirement for a pan European security feature and track and trace systems. The European Commission, working with Member States, is considering proposals and have yet to determine any technical specifications,</p><p> </p><p>HMRC is aware of a wide range of potential track and trace and security feature solutions on the market. They are not evaluating, and, given the current position on the Directive, could not evaluate any products against its requirements. The aspects of Codentify being used are entirely separate from the requirements of the Directive.</p><p> </p><p>In accordance with regulatory requirements, when technical specifications are determined, HMRC will ensure that any evaluation against them ensures no unfair competitive advantage or obstacles to competition.</p>
star this property answering member constituency East Hampshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Damian Hinds more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
31255 more like this
31256 more like this
31257 more like this
31259 more like this
31260 more like this
31261 more like this
31262 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2016-03-23T14:27:40.057Zmore like thismore than 2016-03-23T14:27:40.057Z
unstar this property answering member
3969
star this property label Biography information for Mr Damian Hinds more like this
star this property tabling member
4486
unstar this property label Biography information for Hannah Bardell remove filter
475621
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2016-03-15more like thismore than 2016-03-15
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Tobacco: Smuggling more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether HM Revenue and Customs conducted an open tender exercise to select the Codentify system for piloting as a tobacco product authentication tool. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Livingston more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Hannah Bardell more like this
star this property uin 31259 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2016-03-23more like thismore than 2016-03-23
unstar this property answer text <p>Tobacco products classified as ‘illicit’ in the UK include anything on which duty has not been paid but should have been paid. This includes counterfeit products, brands manufactured legally overseas but not legally sold in the UK, and genuine products originating in the UK and overseas but diverted from legitimate supply chains by criminals. Because of this, HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) officers use a variety of ways to identify illicit product. Testing product authenticity is one mechanism.</p><p> </p><p>To test product authenticity, HMRC uses identifiers required by legislation, for example, Fiscal Marks which manufacturers are required to print on specified tobacco products to show they are UK duty paid, as well as voluntary tools used by the manufacturers. One such voluntary tool is Codentify.</p><p> </p><p>Codentify was developed and introduced by the major tobacco manufacturers on their own initiative through the Digital Coding and Tracking Association (DCTA). HMRC played no part in the development or introduction of the system nor did HMRC require that it be introduced. Codentify codes already feature on packs and are there regardless of any HMRC use of them. HMRC took a policy decision, in line with the commitment to tackle illicit tobacco, to examine whether these existing codes could provide a useful additional tool to help officers authenticate product in the field.</p><p> </p><p>The trial is concerned only with the use of Codentify for product authentication, and no other aspect of the system is being used or evaluated. Codentify requires no specialist equipment or training. Officers are provided with basic guidance and access to an online system. No charge is made for use of the system and, as no procurement was needed, there was no requirement for HMRC to run a tender exercise. As this is a trial only, no Ministerial approval was required or has been sought.</p><p> </p><p>A number of HMRC officers have been given access to the system and trained by HMRC colleagues. The time spent on this activity is minimal and is estimated to be less than one staff year in total.</p><p> </p><p>HMRC has explained the use of Codentify as a potential product authentication tool to colleagues in Border Force and Trading Standards. However, they have not provided training to any officers in those organisations.</p><p> </p><p>The EU Tobacco Products Directive introduces a requirement for a pan European security feature and track and trace systems. The European Commission, working with Member States, is considering proposals and have yet to determine any technical specifications,</p><p> </p><p>HMRC is aware of a wide range of potential track and trace and security feature solutions on the market. They are not evaluating, and, given the current position on the Directive, could not evaluate any products against its requirements. The aspects of Codentify being used are entirely separate from the requirements of the Directive.</p><p> </p><p>In accordance with regulatory requirements, when technical specifications are determined, HMRC will ensure that any evaluation against them ensures no unfair competitive advantage or obstacles to competition.</p>
star this property answering member constituency East Hampshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Damian Hinds more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
31255 more like this
31256 more like this
31257 more like this
31258 more like this
31260 more like this
31261 more like this
31262 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2016-03-23T14:27:40.137Zmore like thismore than 2016-03-23T14:27:40.137Z
unstar this property answering member
3969
star this property label Biography information for Mr Damian Hinds more like this
star this property tabling member
4486
unstar this property label Biography information for Hannah Bardell remove filter
475623
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2016-03-15more like thismore than 2016-03-15
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Tobacco: Smuggling more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether officials of (a) HM Revenue and Customs, (b) Border Force and (c) trading standards services are being trained in the use of Codentify to authenticate tobacco products. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Livingston more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Hannah Bardell more like this
star this property uin 31260 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2016-03-23more like thismore than 2016-03-23
unstar this property answer text <p>Tobacco products classified as ‘illicit’ in the UK include anything on which duty has not been paid but should have been paid. This includes counterfeit products, brands manufactured legally overseas but not legally sold in the UK, and genuine products originating in the UK and overseas but diverted from legitimate supply chains by criminals. Because of this, HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) officers use a variety of ways to identify illicit product. Testing product authenticity is one mechanism.</p><p> </p><p>To test product authenticity, HMRC uses identifiers required by legislation, for example, Fiscal Marks which manufacturers are required to print on specified tobacco products to show they are UK duty paid, as well as voluntary tools used by the manufacturers. One such voluntary tool is Codentify.</p><p> </p><p>Codentify was developed and introduced by the major tobacco manufacturers on their own initiative through the Digital Coding and Tracking Association (DCTA). HMRC played no part in the development or introduction of the system nor did HMRC require that it be introduced. Codentify codes already feature on packs and are there regardless of any HMRC use of them. HMRC took a policy decision, in line with the commitment to tackle illicit tobacco, to examine whether these existing codes could provide a useful additional tool to help officers authenticate product in the field.</p><p> </p><p>The trial is concerned only with the use of Codentify for product authentication, and no other aspect of the system is being used or evaluated. Codentify requires no specialist equipment or training. Officers are provided with basic guidance and access to an online system. No charge is made for use of the system and, as no procurement was needed, there was no requirement for HMRC to run a tender exercise. As this is a trial only, no Ministerial approval was required or has been sought.</p><p> </p><p>A number of HMRC officers have been given access to the system and trained by HMRC colleagues. The time spent on this activity is minimal and is estimated to be less than one staff year in total.</p><p> </p><p>HMRC has explained the use of Codentify as a potential product authentication tool to colleagues in Border Force and Trading Standards. However, they have not provided training to any officers in those organisations.</p><p> </p><p>The EU Tobacco Products Directive introduces a requirement for a pan European security feature and track and trace systems. The European Commission, working with Member States, is considering proposals and have yet to determine any technical specifications,</p><p> </p><p>HMRC is aware of a wide range of potential track and trace and security feature solutions on the market. They are not evaluating, and, given the current position on the Directive, could not evaluate any products against its requirements. The aspects of Codentify being used are entirely separate from the requirements of the Directive.</p><p> </p><p>In accordance with regulatory requirements, when technical specifications are determined, HMRC will ensure that any evaluation against them ensures no unfair competitive advantage or obstacles to competition.</p>
star this property answering member constituency East Hampshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Damian Hinds more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
31255 more like this
31256 more like this
31257 more like this
31258 more like this
31259 more like this
31261 more like this
31262 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2016-03-23T14:27:40.2Zmore like thismore than 2016-03-23T14:27:40.2Z
unstar this property answering member
3969
star this property label Biography information for Mr Damian Hinds more like this
star this property tabling member
4486
unstar this property label Biography information for Hannah Bardell remove filter
475624
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2016-03-15more like thismore than 2016-03-15
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Tobacco: Smuggling more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the cost to the public purse is of (a) access by HM Revenue and Customs to the Codentify system to pilot its use for tobacco product authentication, (b) staff time to use that system and (c) other costs incurred through use of that system. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Livingston more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Hannah Bardell more like this
star this property uin 31261 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2016-03-23more like thismore than 2016-03-23
unstar this property answer text <p>Tobacco products classified as ‘illicit’ in the UK include anything on which duty has not been paid but should have been paid. This includes counterfeit products, brands manufactured legally overseas but not legally sold in the UK, and genuine products originating in the UK and overseas but diverted from legitimate supply chains by criminals. Because of this, HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) officers use a variety of ways to identify illicit product. Testing product authenticity is one mechanism.</p><p> </p><p>To test product authenticity, HMRC uses identifiers required by legislation, for example, Fiscal Marks which manufacturers are required to print on specified tobacco products to show they are UK duty paid, as well as voluntary tools used by the manufacturers. One such voluntary tool is Codentify.</p><p> </p><p>Codentify was developed and introduced by the major tobacco manufacturers on their own initiative through the Digital Coding and Tracking Association (DCTA). HMRC played no part in the development or introduction of the system nor did HMRC require that it be introduced. Codentify codes already feature on packs and are there regardless of any HMRC use of them. HMRC took a policy decision, in line with the commitment to tackle illicit tobacco, to examine whether these existing codes could provide a useful additional tool to help officers authenticate product in the field.</p><p> </p><p>The trial is concerned only with the use of Codentify for product authentication, and no other aspect of the system is being used or evaluated. Codentify requires no specialist equipment or training. Officers are provided with basic guidance and access to an online system. No charge is made for use of the system and, as no procurement was needed, there was no requirement for HMRC to run a tender exercise. As this is a trial only, no Ministerial approval was required or has been sought.</p><p> </p><p>A number of HMRC officers have been given access to the system and trained by HMRC colleagues. The time spent on this activity is minimal and is estimated to be less than one staff year in total.</p><p> </p><p>HMRC has explained the use of Codentify as a potential product authentication tool to colleagues in Border Force and Trading Standards. However, they have not provided training to any officers in those organisations.</p><p> </p><p>The EU Tobacco Products Directive introduces a requirement for a pan European security feature and track and trace systems. The European Commission, working with Member States, is considering proposals and have yet to determine any technical specifications,</p><p> </p><p>HMRC is aware of a wide range of potential track and trace and security feature solutions on the market. They are not evaluating, and, given the current position on the Directive, could not evaluate any products against its requirements. The aspects of Codentify being used are entirely separate from the requirements of the Directive.</p><p> </p><p>In accordance with regulatory requirements, when technical specifications are determined, HMRC will ensure that any evaluation against them ensures no unfair competitive advantage or obstacles to competition.</p>
star this property answering member constituency East Hampshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Damian Hinds more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
31255 more like this
31256 more like this
31257 more like this
31258 more like this
31259 more like this
31260 more like this
31262 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2016-03-23T14:27:40.29Zmore like thismore than 2016-03-23T14:27:40.29Z
unstar this property answering member
3969
star this property label Biography information for Mr Damian Hinds more like this
star this property tabling member
4486
unstar this property label Biography information for Hannah Bardell remove filter