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156786
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove maximum value filtermore like thismore than 2014-11-19
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Youth Offending Teams more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many officials from his Department are working on the Youth Offending Team Stock Take announced by the Minister for Prisons, Probation and Rehabilitation on 17 November 2014. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Barnsley Central more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Dan Jarvis more like this
star this property uin 215235 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2014-11-24more like thismore than 2014-11-24
star this property answer text <p /> <p>Youth Offending Teams (YOTs) play a key part in the youth justice system and the Government recognises their valuable contribution to the recent successes of the system. We want to improve our understanding of how YOTs are operating and how they have evolved in light of the changing circumstances surrounding the delivery of local youth justice services. We are working closely with the Youth Justice Board to finalise the details of this stocktake, which will establish a clearer picture of how the YOT model is operating nationwide.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency South West Bedfordshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Andrew Selous more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
215236 more like this
215327 more like this
215328 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-11-24T17:59:19.373Zmore like thismore than 2014-11-24T17:59:19.373Z
star this property answering member
1453
star this property label Biography information for Andrew Selous more like this
star this property tabling member
4243
unstar this property label Biography information for Dan Jarvis remove filter
156787
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove maximum value filtermore like thismore than 2014-11-19
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Youth Offending Teams more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, which youth offending teams will be included in the sample that will be the focus of the fieldwork carried out for the Youth Offending Team Stock Take announced by the Minister for Prisons, Probation and Rehabilitation on 17 November 2014. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Barnsley Central more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Dan Jarvis more like this
star this property uin 215236 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2014-11-24more like thismore than 2014-11-24
star this property answer text <p>Youth Offending Teams (YOTs) play a key part in the youth justice system and the Government recognises their valuable contribution to the recent successes of the system. We want to improve our understanding of how YOTs are operating and how they have evolved in light of the changing circumstances surrounding the delivery of local youth justice services. We are working closely with the Youth Justice Board to finalise the details of this stocktake, which will establish a clearer picture of how the YOT model is operating nationwide.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency South West Bedfordshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Andrew Selous more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
215235 more like this
215327 more like this
215328 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-11-24T17:59:19.477Zmore like thismore than 2014-11-24T17:59:19.477Z
star this property answering member
1453
star this property label Biography information for Andrew Selous more like this
star this property tabling member
4243
unstar this property label Biography information for Dan Jarvis remove filter
156788
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove maximum value filtermore like thismore than 2014-11-19
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Youth Offending Teams more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what budget his Department has allocated to the youth offending team stock take announced by the Minister for Prisons, Probation and Rehabilitation on 17 November 2014. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Barnsley Central more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Dan Jarvis more like this
star this property uin 215328 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2014-11-24more like thismore than 2014-11-24
star this property answer text <p>Youth Offending Teams (YOTs) play a key part in the youth justice system and the Government recognises their valuable contribution to the recent successes of the system. We want to improve our understanding of how YOTs are operating and how they have evolved in light of the changing circumstances surrounding the delivery of local youth justice services. We are working closely with the Youth Justice Board to finalise the details of this stocktake, which will establish a clearer picture of how the YOT model is operating nationwide.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency South West Bedfordshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Andrew Selous more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
215235 more like this
215236 more like this
215327 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-11-24T17:59:19.663Zmore like thismore than 2014-11-24T17:59:19.663Z
star this property answering member
1453
star this property label Biography information for Andrew Selous more like this
star this property tabling member
4243
unstar this property label Biography information for Dan Jarvis remove filter
156789
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove maximum value filtermore like thismore than 2014-11-19
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Youth Offending Teams more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when his Department plans to publish the results of the youth offending team stock take announced by the Minister for Prisons, Probation and Rehabilitation on 17 November 2014; and if he will make a statement. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Barnsley Central more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Dan Jarvis more like this
star this property uin 215327 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2014-11-24more like thismore than 2014-11-24
star this property answer text <p>Youth Offending Teams (YOTs) play a key part in the youth justice system and the Government recognises their valuable contribution to the recent successes of the system. We want to improve our understanding of how YOTs are operating and how they have evolved in light of the changing circumstances surrounding the delivery of local youth justice services. We are working closely with the Youth Justice Board to finalise the details of this stocktake, which will establish a clearer picture of how the YOT model is operating nationwide.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency South West Bedfordshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Andrew Selous more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
215235 more like this
215236 more like this
215328 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-11-24T17:59:19.57Zmore like thismore than 2014-11-24T17:59:19.57Z
star this property answering member
1453
star this property label Biography information for Andrew Selous more like this
star this property tabling member
4243
unstar this property label Biography information for Dan Jarvis remove filter
76903
star this property registered interest true more like this
star this property date less than 2014-07-09more like thismore than 2014-07-09
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Youth Justice more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many children in the child protection system entered the youth justice system in England and Wales in each of the last 10 years. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Barnsley Central more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Dan Jarvis more like this
star this property uin 204951 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2014-07-14more like thismore than 2014-07-14
star this property answer text <p>The ‘child protection system' can be taken to encompass a wide framework of referral, assessment, investigation and care processes. Information is not held centrally on the number of children subject to such processes who have entered the youth justice system.</p><p> </p><p>Young people entering the youth justice system will receive a full assessment of their needs by a youth justice practitioner, which will include establishing their care status and history and evaluation of other factors affecting their offending behaviour, in order to inform effective interventions.</p><p> </p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Kenilworth and Southam more like this
star this property answering member printed Jeremy Wright more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-07-14T16:51:12.6643946Zmore like thismore than 2014-07-14T16:51:12.6643946Z
star this property answering member
1560
star this property label Biography information for Jeremy Wright more like this
star this property tabling member
4243
unstar this property label Biography information for Dan Jarvis remove filter
106449
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-11-04more like thismore than 2014-11-04
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Youth Custody more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many offenders in youth custody have been placed in segregation units in each year since May 2010. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Barnsley Central more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Dan Jarvis more like this
star this property uin 213432 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2014-11-07more like thismore than 2014-11-07
star this property answer text <p /> <p>Overall crime and proven offending by young people has fallen in recent years. Fewer young people have entered the criminal justice system, and as a result fewer young people have ended up in custody. The average number of young people in custody fell from 2,418 in 2009/10 to 1,233 in 2013/14, a decrease of 49%.</p><p><strong> </strong></p><p>There are some occasions when it is necessary to remove young people from association because their behaviour is likely to be so disruptive that keeping them on ordinary location would be unsafe, or because their own safety and wellbeing cannot reasonably be assured by other means. Removal from association cannot be used as a punishment, and there are careful limits placed on the length of time for which young people can be separated. In the consultation on our plans for Secure College Rules we are seeking views on the safeguards that should be included in the Rules to ensure that separation is used appropriately in Secure Colleges.</p><p> </p><p>Young people in Young Offender Institutions (YOIs) cannot be removed from association and placed in a separation and care unit for more than 72 hours without the authority of the Secretary of State. If authorised by the Secretary of State, separation cannot be for longer than for 14 days, but it may be renewed after review for the same period again.</p><p> </p><p>The Secure Training Centre (STC) rules state that a young person cannot be removed from association for more than three hours in any 24-hour period. The regulatory framework for Secure Children Homes (SCH) does not set a time limit on the use of separation.</p><p><strong> </strong></p><p>The Youth Justice Board (YJB) for England &amp; Wales does not collect data on the number of offenders who were subject to separation[1], but does collect data on the number of incidents of separation.</p><p> </p><p>Table 1 below shows the number of incidents of separation that took place in STCs and SCHs in each year since April 2010.</p><p><strong> </strong></p><p><strong>Table 1: The number of separation incidents in SCHs and STCs in each year since April 2010</strong></p><table><tbody><tr><td><p><strong>Establishment type</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2010/11</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2011/12</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2012/13</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2013/14<strong>[2]</strong></strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Secure Children’s Home</p></td><td><p>3,350</p></td><td><p>3,318</p></td><td><p>2,320</p></td><td><p>1,899</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Secure Training Centre</p></td><td><p>1,112</p></td><td><p>563</p></td><td><p>392</p></td><td><p>488</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>Total</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>4,462</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>3,881</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2,712</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2,387</strong></p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p>The National Offender Management Service (NOMS) does not collect data on the number of young offenders who were subject to an incident of separation, but does count the total number of young people in segregation[3] in each 24-hour period. For example, one young person in segregation for five days and one young person segregated for two hours would count as six young people in segregation (5 days + 1 day). This data is, however, only available for the period from October 2012 to September 2014.</p><p>Table 2 shows the total number of young people in segregation in YOIs in each year since October 2012, based on adding together the daily counts of the number of young people in segregation in each 24-hour period. Due to the nature of the counting rules, this does not indicate the number of individual young people held in segregation, as an incident can be counted multiple times if the segregation period covers more than a single 24-hour period.</p><p> </p><p><strong>Table 2: Total number of young people in segregation in YOIs in each year since October 2012, based on adding together the daily counts of the number of young people in segregation in each 24-hour period</strong></p><table><tbody><tr><td><p><strong>Establishment type</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Oct-12 to Sep-13</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Oct-13 to Sep-14</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Young Offender Institution</p></td><td><p>10,778</p></td><td><p>7,970</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p>The Youth Justice Board collects data on time in separation in both STCs and SCHs in the following time bands: 0-15 minutes, 16-30 minutes, 31-60 minutes, 61-120 minutes, 121-180 minutes and 181+ minutes. Therefore it is not possible to state the average duration or the longest period of time for which young people are in separation. NOMS does not hold the equivalent data for YOIs.</p><p> </p><p>Table 3 shows the number of separation incidents in STCs and SCHs in each year since April 2010 by duration band.</p><p><strong>Table 3: The number of separation incidents in SCHs and STCs in each year since April 2010 by duration band<strong>[4]</strong></strong></p><table><tbody><tr><td><p><strong>Duration</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Establishment Type</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2010/11</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2011/12</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2012/13</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2013/14<strong>[5]</strong></strong></p></td></tr><tr><td rowspan="3"><p>0 - 15 minutes</p></td><td><p>Secure Children's Homes</p></td><td><p>440</p></td><td><p>460</p></td><td><p>319</p></td><td><p>232</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Secure Training Centres</p></td><td><p>434</p></td><td><p>192</p></td><td><p>166</p></td><td><p>183</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>Total</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>874</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>652</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>485</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>415</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td rowspan="3"><p>16 - 30 minutes</p></td><td><p>Secure Children's Homes</p></td><td><p>874</p></td><td><p>955</p></td><td><p>572</p></td><td><p>474</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Secure Training Centres</p></td><td><p>347</p></td><td><p>191</p></td><td><p>104</p></td><td><p>136</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>Total</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>1,221</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>1,146</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>676</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>610</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td rowspan="3"><p>31 - 60 minutes</p></td><td><p>Secure Children's Homes</p></td><td><p>913</p></td><td><p>954</p></td><td><p>656</p></td><td><p>540</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Secure Training Centres</p></td><td><p>288</p></td><td><p>146</p></td><td><p>100</p></td><td><p>139</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>Total</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>1,201</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>1,100</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>756</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>679</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td rowspan="3"><p>61 - 120 minutes</p></td><td><p>Secure Children's Homes</p></td><td><p>567</p></td><td><p>537</p></td><td><p>429</p></td><td><p>381</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Secure Training Centres</p></td><td><p>36</p></td><td><p>25</p></td><td><p>20</p></td><td><p>13</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>Total</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>603</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>562</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>449</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>394</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td rowspan="3"><p>121 - 180 minutes</p></td><td><p>Secure Children's Homes</p></td><td><p>265</p></td><td><p>172</p></td><td><p>151</p></td><td><p>119</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Secure Training Centres</p></td><td><p>7</p></td><td><p>7</p></td><td><p>2</p></td><td><p>15</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>Total</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>272</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>179</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>153</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>134</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td rowspan="3"><p>181+ minutes</p></td><td><p>Secure Children's Homes</p></td><td><p>292</p></td><td><p>245</p></td><td><p>193</p></td><td><p>153</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Secure Training Centres</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>2</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>2</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>Total</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>292</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>247</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>193</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>155</strong></p></td></tr></tbody></table><br /><p>[1] Separation is defined as where, during the core day, including evenings and weekends, a young person is removed from his/her scheduled activity and placed away from other young people and members of staff without any meaningful interaction and is prevented from returning even where he/she may request to do so.</p><p> </p><p>Separation does not include instances where:</p><p>• A young person is interacting meaningfully with a member of staff</p><p>• A young person can choose to re-join the scheduled activity</p><p>• A young person is separated as part of formally agreed rewards and sanctions (such as early bed sanction)</p><p>• Any aspects of the normal routine, such as lock down</p><p> </p><p>[2] Data for 2013/14 is provisional and will be finalised in the 2013/14 Youth Justice Statistics in January 2015.</p><p> </p><p>[3]YOI prisoners can be held in segregation on the following Prison / YOI Rules:</p><p>· Under Prison Rule 45 (YOI Rule 49) – Good Order or Discipline.</p><p>· Under Prison Rule 45 (YOI Rule 49) – Own protection.</p><p>· Under Prison Rule 53(4) (YOI Rule 58(4)) – Prisoner awaiting an adjudication to start may be kept apart from other prisoners pending the governor’s first inquiry.</p><p>· Under Prison Rule 55(h) (YOI Rule 60(g)) – Removal from wing/unit for a prisoner found guilty of an offence against discipline.</p><p> </p><p>[4] These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing and can be subject to change over time.</p><p>[5] Data for 2013/14 is provisional and will be finalised in the 2013/14 Youth Justice Statistics in January 2015.</p>
star this property answering member constituency North West Cambridgeshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Mr Shailesh Vara more like this
star this property grouped question UIN 213433 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-11-07T14:44:25.7537353Zmore like thismore than 2014-11-07T14:44:25.7537353Z
star this property answering member
1496
star this property label Biography information for Mr Shailesh Vara more like this
star this property tabling member
4243
unstar this property label Biography information for Dan Jarvis remove filter
106450
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-11-04more like thismore than 2014-11-04
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Youth Custody more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the (a) average and (b) longest periods of time is that offenders in youth custody have been placed in segregation units in each year since May 2010. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Barnsley Central more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Dan Jarvis more like this
star this property uin 213433 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2014-11-07more like thismore than 2014-11-07
star this property answer text <p>Overall crime and proven offending by young people has fallen in recent years. Fewer young people have entered the criminal justice system, and as a result fewer young people have ended up in custody. The average number of young people in custody fell from 2,418 in 2009/10 to 1,233 in 2013/14, a decrease of 49%.</p><p><strong> </strong></p><p>There are some occasions when it is necessary to remove young people from association because their behaviour is likely to be so disruptive that keeping them on ordinary location would be unsafe, or because their own safety and wellbeing cannot reasonably be assured by other means. Removal from association cannot be used as a punishment, and there are careful limits placed on the length of time for which young people can be separated. In the consultation on our plans for Secure College Rules we are seeking views on the safeguards that should be included in the Rules to ensure that separation is used appropriately in Secure Colleges.</p><p> </p><p>Young people in Young Offender Institutions (YOIs) cannot be removed from association and placed in a separation and care unit for more than 72 hours without the authority of the Secretary of State. If authorised by the Secretary of State, separation cannot be for longer than for 14 days, but it may be renewed after review for the same period again.</p><p> </p><p>The Secure Training Centre (STC) rules state that a young person cannot be removed from association for more than three hours in any 24-hour period. The regulatory framework for Secure Children Homes (SCH) does not set a time limit on the use of separation.</p><p><strong> </strong></p><p>The Youth Justice Board (YJB) for England &amp; Wales does not collect data on the number of offenders who were subject to separation[1], but does collect data on the number of incidents of separation.</p><p> </p><p>Table 1 below shows the number of incidents of separation that took place in STCs and SCHs in each year since April 2010.</p><p><strong> </strong></p><p><strong>Table 1: The number of separation incidents in SCHs and STCs in each year since April 2010</strong></p><table><tbody><tr><td><p><strong>Establishment type</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2010/11</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2011/12</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2012/13</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2013/14<strong>[2]</strong></strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Secure Children’s Home</p></td><td><p>3,350</p></td><td><p>3,318</p></td><td><p>2,320</p></td><td><p>1,899</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Secure Training Centre</p></td><td><p>1,112</p></td><td><p>563</p></td><td><p>392</p></td><td><p>488</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>Total</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>4,462</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>3,881</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2,712</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2,387</strong></p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p>The National Offender Management Service (NOMS) does not collect data on the number of young offenders who were subject to an incident of separation, but does count the total number of young people in segregation[3] in each 24-hour period. For example, one young person in segregation for five days and one young person segregated for two hours would count as six young people in segregation (5 days + 1 day). This data is, however, only available for the period from October 2012 to September 2014.</p><p>Table 2 shows the total number of young people in segregation in YOIs in each year since October 2012, based on adding together the daily counts of the number of young people in segregation in each 24-hour period. Due to the nature of the counting rules, this does not indicate the number of individual young people held in segregation, as an incident can be counted multiple times if the segregation period covers more than a single 24-hour period.</p><p> </p><p><strong>Table 2: Total number of young people in segregation in YOIs in each year since October 2012, based on adding together the daily counts of the number of young people in segregation in each 24-hour period</strong></p><table><tbody><tr><td><p><strong>Establishment type</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Oct-12 to Sep-13</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Oct-13 to Sep-14</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Young Offender Institution</p></td><td><p>10,778</p></td><td><p>7,970</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p>The Youth Justice Board collects data on time in separation in both STCs and SCHs in the following time bands: 0-15 minutes, 16-30 minutes, 31-60 minutes, 61-120 minutes, 121-180 minutes and 181+ minutes. Therefore it is not possible to state the average duration or the longest period of time for which young people are in separation. NOMS does not hold the equivalent data for YOIs.</p><p> </p><p>Table 3 shows the number of separation incidents in STCs and SCHs in each year since April 2010 by duration band.</p><p><strong>Table 3: The number of separation incidents in SCHs and STCs in each year since April 2010 by duration band<strong>[4]</strong></strong></p><table><tbody><tr><td><p><strong>Duration</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Establishment Type</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2010/11</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2011/12</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2012/13</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2013/14<strong>[5]</strong></strong></p></td></tr><tr><td rowspan="3"><p>0 - 15 minutes</p></td><td><p>Secure Children's Homes</p></td><td><p>440</p></td><td><p>460</p></td><td><p>319</p></td><td><p>232</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Secure Training Centres</p></td><td><p>434</p></td><td><p>192</p></td><td><p>166</p></td><td><p>183</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>Total</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>874</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>652</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>485</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>415</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td rowspan="3"><p>16 - 30 minutes</p></td><td><p>Secure Children's Homes</p></td><td><p>874</p></td><td><p>955</p></td><td><p>572</p></td><td><p>474</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Secure Training Centres</p></td><td><p>347</p></td><td><p>191</p></td><td><p>104</p></td><td><p>136</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>Total</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>1,221</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>1,146</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>676</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>610</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td rowspan="3"><p>31 - 60 minutes</p></td><td><p>Secure Children's Homes</p></td><td><p>913</p></td><td><p>954</p></td><td><p>656</p></td><td><p>540</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Secure Training Centres</p></td><td><p>288</p></td><td><p>146</p></td><td><p>100</p></td><td><p>139</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>Total</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>1,201</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>1,100</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>756</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>679</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td rowspan="3"><p>61 - 120 minutes</p></td><td><p>Secure Children's Homes</p></td><td><p>567</p></td><td><p>537</p></td><td><p>429</p></td><td><p>381</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Secure Training Centres</p></td><td><p>36</p></td><td><p>25</p></td><td><p>20</p></td><td><p>13</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>Total</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>603</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>562</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>449</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>394</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td rowspan="3"><p>121 - 180 minutes</p></td><td><p>Secure Children's Homes</p></td><td><p>265</p></td><td><p>172</p></td><td><p>151</p></td><td><p>119</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Secure Training Centres</p></td><td><p>7</p></td><td><p>7</p></td><td><p>2</p></td><td><p>15</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>Total</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>272</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>179</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>153</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>134</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td rowspan="3"><p>181+ minutes</p></td><td><p>Secure Children's Homes</p></td><td><p>292</p></td><td><p>245</p></td><td><p>193</p></td><td><p>153</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Secure Training Centres</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>2</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>2</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>Total</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>292</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>247</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>193</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>155</strong></p></td></tr></tbody></table><br /><p>[1] Separation is defined as where, during the core day, including evenings and weekends, a young person is removed from his/her scheduled activity and placed away from other young people and members of staff without any meaningful interaction and is prevented from returning even where he/she may request to do so.</p><p> </p><p>Separation does not include instances where:</p><p>• A young person is interacting meaningfully with a member of staff</p><p>• A young person can choose to re-join the scheduled activity</p><p>• A young person is separated as part of formally agreed rewards and sanctions (such as early bed sanction)</p><p>• Any aspects of the normal routine, such as lock down</p><p> </p><p>[2] Data for 2013/14 is provisional and will be finalised in the 2013/14 Youth Justice Statistics in January 2015.</p><p> </p><p>[3]YOI prisoners can be held in segregation on the following Prison / YOI Rules:</p><p>· Under Prison Rule 45 (YOI Rule 49) – Good Order or Discipline.</p><p>· Under Prison Rule 45 (YOI Rule 49) – Own protection.</p><p>· Under Prison Rule 53(4) (YOI Rule 58(4)) – Prisoner awaiting an adjudication to start may be kept apart from other prisoners pending the governor’s first inquiry.</p><p>· Under Prison Rule 55(h) (YOI Rule 60(g)) – Removal from wing/unit for a prisoner found guilty of an offence against discipline.</p><p> </p><p>[4] These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing and can be subject to change over time.</p><p>[5] Data for 2013/14 is provisional and will be finalised in the 2013/14 Youth Justice Statistics in January 2015.</p>
star this property answering member constituency North West Cambridgeshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Mr Shailesh Vara more like this
star this property grouped question UIN 213432 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-11-07T14:44:26.0585417Zmore like thismore than 2014-11-07T14:44:26.0585417Z
star this property answering member
1496
star this property label Biography information for Mr Shailesh Vara more like this
star this property tabling member
4243
unstar this property label Biography information for Dan Jarvis remove filter
106452
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-11-04more like thismore than 2014-11-04
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Youth Custody more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the proportion of offenders in youth custody who are black, Asian and minority ethnic in each year since May 2010. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Barnsley Central more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Dan Jarvis more like this
star this property uin 213434 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2014-11-07more like thismore than 2014-11-07
star this property answer text <p /> <p>The Youth Justice Board for England and Wales (YJB) is working in partnership with a wide range of public, private and voluntary and community sector organisations to seek to take preventative action to ensure that young people do not end up in custody. This includes programmes to work with certain ethnic groups and disadvantaged young people, to prevent them from becoming involved in crime.</p><p> </p><p>The estimated proportions of black, Asian and minority ethnic (BME) offenders in youth custody are shown in Table 1 below:</p><p> </p><p><strong>Proportion of under-18 BME offenders (including Asian, black, mixed and other ethnicity) in custody based on the average number of offenders in the 12 months starting May 2010 to the 12 months starting May 2013.</strong></p><p><strong> </strong></p><table><tbody><tr><td><p><strong>BME</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Average no. of BME offenders in youth custody</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Average no. of offenders in youth custody</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Percentage proportion of BME offenders in youth custody</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010/11</p></td><td><p>600</p></td><td><p>2,023</p></td><td><p>30%</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2011/12</p></td><td><p>568</p></td><td><p>1,953</p></td><td><p>29%</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2012/13</p></td><td><p>564</p></td><td><p>1,499</p></td><td><p>38%</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2013/14</p></td><td><p>465</p></td><td><p>1,217</p></td><td><p>38%</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p><strong> </strong></p><p> </p><p>More detailed figures showing the number of offenders in youth custody who are black, Asian and minority ethnic in each month from April 2005 to August 2014 can be accessed via following link (see tab 2.6 Ethnicity):</p><p><a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/367369/youth-custody-report-august-2014.xls" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/367369/youth-custody-report-august-2014.xls</a></p><p>The data provided is a monthly snapshot of the custodial population in the secure estate for children and young people, taken on the last Friday of the month or first Friday of the following month, depending on which is nearer to the actual month end.</p><p> </p><p>From April 2012, the under-18 custody population data comes from the eAsset database. This is the booking system the Youth Justice Board's Placements Service uses to book young people into custody.</p><p> </p><p>The information prior to April 2012 comes from the Youth Justice Board's (YJB’s) Secure Accommodation Clearing House System (SACHS) database.</p>
star this property answering member constituency South West Bedfordshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Andrew Selous more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-11-07T14:35:07.0544372Zmore like thismore than 2014-11-07T14:35:07.0544372Z
star this property answering member
1453
star this property label Biography information for Andrew Selous more like this
star this property tabling member
4243
unstar this property label Biography information for Dan Jarvis remove filter
106453
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-11-04more like thismore than 2014-11-04
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Youth Custody more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what his policy is on allowing former offenders to visit youth custody environments. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Barnsley Central more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Dan Jarvis more like this
star this property uin 213435 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2014-11-07more like thismore than 2014-11-07
star this property answer text <p /> <p>The Government believes reformed offenders can play a positive role in rehabilitating young and adult offenders through mentoring and demonstrating the possibility for change.</p><p> </p><p>It is for the Governors of Young Offender Institutions, Directors of Secure Training Centres and Managers of Secure Children’s Homes to approve the visit of any person to a custodial establishment. Consideration will be given to the purpose of the visit, an assessment of the risk that the individual poses, and to wider responsibilities to ensure that young people are safeguarded at all times.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency South West Bedfordshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Andrew Selous more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-11-07T14:24:47.917279Zmore like thismore than 2014-11-07T14:24:47.917279Z
star this property answering member
1453
star this property label Biography information for Andrew Selous more like this
star this property tabling member
4243
unstar this property label Biography information for Dan Jarvis remove filter
147487
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-11-10more like thismore than 2014-11-10
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Youth Custody more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer by the Minister for Prisons, Probation and Rehabilitation of 4 November 2014, to Question 213435, how many former offenders have been allowed to visit secure childrens' homes in each year since May 2010. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Barnsley Central more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Dan Jarvis more like this
star this property uin 214109 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2014-11-17more like thismore than 2014-11-17
star this property answer text <p /> <p>The Government believes reformed offenders can play a positive role in rehabilitating young and adult offenders through mentoring and demonstrating the possibility for change.</p><p> </p><p>Information is not held on the number of ex-offenders visiting the youth secure estate. Governors of Young Offender Institutions, Directors of Secure Training Centres and Managers of Secure Children’s Homes use their discretion to approve any visits to their individual establishments. Consideration will be given to the purpose of the visit, an assessment of the risk that the individual poses, and to wider responsibilities to ensure that young people are safeguarded at all times.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency South West Bedfordshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Andrew Selous more like this
star this property grouped question UIN 214110 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-11-17T17:47:41.137Zmore like thismore than 2014-11-17T17:47:41.137Z
star this property answering member
1453
star this property label Biography information for Andrew Selous more like this
star this property tabling member
4243
unstar this property label Biography information for Dan Jarvis remove filter