Linked Data API

Show Search Form

Search Results

1129583
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-04more like thismore than 2019-06-04
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Bank Services: Proof of Identity more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government whether all existing banking customers must provide proof of identification to banks to check for possible money laundering; if so, under which regulations this policy was brought in; whether an impact assessment was carried out on the costs to customers, particularly those in rural areas, of any such requirements; and what estimate they have made of the total cost of any such policy. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Vinson more like this
star this property uin HL16068 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2019-06-18more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answer text The Money Laundering Regulations 2017 (‘the Regulations’) do not require banks to carry out customer due diligence – including identity checks—on all existing customers. The Regulations instead require banks to take a proportionate approach to applying customer due diligence checks commensurate with the risk of money laundering. The legal requirements on banks to carry out customer diligence for existing customers are set out in Regulations 27(8)(9) and 29(7). The Joint Money Laundering Steering Group’s guidance provides further detail on applying these requirements.<p> </p><p>The impact assessment for the transposition of the 4th EU Money Laundering Directive (which led to the most recent revision of the regulations) estimates the total cost of the changes made, while concluding that industry has difficulty in identifying costs caused by the money laundering regulations. This is particularly the case for customer due diligence as many of these are costs that a prudent business would take on in any case as a matter of commercial practice, to comply with UN or EU sanctions, or to protect themselves and their customers from fraud. The full impact assessment is available on gov.uk.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-18T15:20:03.29Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-18T15:20:03.29Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
1807
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Vinson more like this
1132405
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-17more like thismore than 2019-06-17
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Borders: Northern Ireland more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when the Border Delivery Group last met with representatives of (a) ports and (b) airports in Northern Ireland. more like this
unstar this property tabling member constituency East Londonderry more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Mr Gregory Campbell more like this
star this property uin 265453 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2019-06-20more like thismore than 2019-06-20
star this property answer text The Border Delivery Group runs a Northern Ireland Borders Steering Group, which includes representatives from ports and airports in Northern Ireland. The most recent Border Delivery Group engagement with this group was on 15 March 2019. The next Steering Group meeting is planned for early September. more like this
star this property answering member constituency Hereford and South Herefordshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Jesse Norman more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-20T11:13:19.343Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-20T11:13:19.343Z
star this property answering member
3991
star this property label Biography information for Jesse Norman more like this
star this property tabling member
1409
unstar this property label Biography information for Mr Gregory Campbell more like this
1132259
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-14more like thismore than 2019-06-14
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading Universal Credit more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how much her Department has spent on legal costs in the case of R (Johnson and Ors) v SSWP [2019] EWHC 23 (Admin) as of 14 June 2019. more like this
unstar this property tabling member constituency Wirral West more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Margaret Greenwood more like this
star this property uin 264777 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2019-06-19more like thismore than 2019-06-19
star this property answer text As at 14th June 2019, the Department has spent £52,446 on legal costs defending and appealing the case of Johnson &amp; Others v SSWP. This includes Government Legal Department litigation fees, counsel’s fees and other disbursements, as well as VAT where payable. This does not include payment of the claimants’ solicitor’s costs. Time spent by Government advisory lawyers is not recorded in a manner that allows it to be attributed to individual cases. more like this
star this property answering member constituency Reading West more like this
star this property answering member printed Alok Sharma more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-19T13:58:43.847Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-19T13:58:43.847Z
star this property answering member
4014
star this property label Biography information for Alok Sharma more like this
star this property tabling member
4400
unstar this property label Biography information for Margaret Greenwood more like this
1130929
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-10more like thismore than 2019-06-10
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Offences Against Children: Internet more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many UK nationals have been convicted of offences relating to the online sexual exploitation of children in each of the last five years. more like this
unstar this property tabling member constituency Gedling more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Vernon Coaker more like this
star this property uin 262240 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2019-06-18more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answer text <table><tbody><tr><td><p>We have interpreted ‘sexual exploitation of children’ as child sexual abuse offences, as sexual exploitation of children is not specifically defined in legislation. The Ministry of Justice has published information (<a href="https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/804510/HO-code-tool-principal-offence-2018.xlsx" target="_blank">https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/804510/HO-code-tool-principal-offence-2018.xlsx</a>) on the number of defendants found guilty of child sexual abuse offences and average custodial sentence lengths, however it is not possible to identify the nationality of the defendant as this information is not held in the courts proceedings database. Additionally, centrally held court and prisons data does not distinguish online child sexual abuse offences from all child sexual abuse offences. Information on offences that involve online sexual exploitation of children may be held on record, however to identify these records would be at a disproportionate cost. I have made no assessment of sentencing for offences relating to the online sexual exploitation of children. Sentencing in individual cases is a matter for the Courts, who must follow any relevant guidelines produced by the Sentencing Council for England and Wales. The Sentencing Council has a duty under section 128 of the Coroners and Justice Act 2009 to monitor the operation and effect of its guidelines. Child sexual abuse is abhorrent and rightly carries tough sentences including life imprisonment for the most serious offences. The Sexual Offences Act 2003 provides a range of offences with robust sentences to tackle the scourge of child sexual exploitation in all its forms. Sentencing is a matter for the independent judiciary, who take into account the full facts of each case.</p></td></tr></tbody></table>
star this property answering member constituency South Swindon more like this
star this property answering member printed Robert Buckland more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
262241 more like this
262242 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-18T14:52:50.447Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-18T14:52:50.447Z
star this property answering member
4106
star this property label Biography information for Robert Buckland more like this
star this property tabling member
360
unstar this property label Biography information for Vernon Coaker more like this
1130930
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-10more like thismore than 2019-06-10
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Offences Against Children: Sentencing more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of sentences for people convicted of offences relating to the online sexual exploitation of children; and if he will make a statement. more like this
unstar this property tabling member constituency Gedling more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Vernon Coaker more like this
star this property uin 262241 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2019-06-18more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answer text <table><tbody><tr><td><p>We have interpreted ‘sexual exploitation of children’ as child sexual abuse offences, as sexual exploitation of children is not specifically defined in legislation. The Ministry of Justice has published information (<a href="https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/804510/HO-code-tool-principal-offence-2018.xlsx" target="_blank">https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/804510/HO-code-tool-principal-offence-2018.xlsx</a>) on the number of defendants found guilty of child sexual abuse offences and average custodial sentence lengths, however it is not possible to identify the nationality of the defendant as this information is not held in the courts proceedings database. Additionally, centrally held court and prisons data does not distinguish online child sexual abuse offences from all child sexual abuse offences. Information on offences that involve online sexual exploitation of children may be held on record, however to identify these records would be at a disproportionate cost. I have made no assessment of sentencing for offences relating to the online sexual exploitation of children. Sentencing in individual cases is a matter for the Courts, who must follow any relevant guidelines produced by the Sentencing Council for England and Wales. The Sentencing Council has a duty under section 128 of the Coroners and Justice Act 2009 to monitor the operation and effect of its guidelines. Child sexual abuse is abhorrent and rightly carries tough sentences including life imprisonment for the most serious offences. The Sexual Offences Act 2003 provides a range of offences with robust sentences to tackle the scourge of child sexual exploitation in all its forms. Sentencing is a matter for the independent judiciary, who take into account the full facts of each case.</p></td></tr></tbody></table>
star this property answering member constituency South Swindon more like this
star this property answering member printed Robert Buckland more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
262240 more like this
262242 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-18T14:52:50.5Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-18T14:52:50.5Z
star this property answering member
4106
star this property label Biography information for Robert Buckland more like this
star this property tabling member
360
unstar this property label Biography information for Vernon Coaker more like this
1130931
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-10more like thismore than 2019-06-10
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Offences Against Children: Sentencing more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average length of sentence (a) awarded and (b) served has been for individuals found guilty of the online sexual exploitation of children in each of the last five years. more like this
unstar this property tabling member constituency Gedling more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Vernon Coaker more like this
star this property uin 262242 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2019-06-18more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answer text <table><tbody><tr><td><p>We have interpreted ‘sexual exploitation of children’ as child sexual abuse offences, as sexual exploitation of children is not specifically defined in legislation. The Ministry of Justice has published information (<a href="https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/804510/HO-code-tool-principal-offence-2018.xlsx" target="_blank">https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/804510/HO-code-tool-principal-offence-2018.xlsx</a>) on the number of defendants found guilty of child sexual abuse offences and average custodial sentence lengths, however it is not possible to identify the nationality of the defendant as this information is not held in the courts proceedings database. Additionally, centrally held court and prisons data does not distinguish online child sexual abuse offences from all child sexual abuse offences. Information on offences that involve online sexual exploitation of children may be held on record, however to identify these records would be at a disproportionate cost. I have made no assessment of sentencing for offences relating to the online sexual exploitation of children. Sentencing in individual cases is a matter for the Courts, who must follow any relevant guidelines produced by the Sentencing Council for England and Wales. The Sentencing Council has a duty under section 128 of the Coroners and Justice Act 2009 to monitor the operation and effect of its guidelines. Child sexual abuse is abhorrent and rightly carries tough sentences including life imprisonment for the most serious offences. The Sexual Offences Act 2003 provides a range of offences with robust sentences to tackle the scourge of child sexual exploitation in all its forms. Sentencing is a matter for the independent judiciary, who take into account the full facts of each case.</p></td></tr></tbody></table>
star this property answering member constituency South Swindon more like this
star this property answering member printed Robert Buckland more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
262240 more like this
262241 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-18T14:52:50.547Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-18T14:52:50.547Z
star this property answering member
4106
star this property label Biography information for Robert Buckland more like this
star this property tabling member
360
unstar this property label Biography information for Vernon Coaker more like this
1130963
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-10more like thismore than 2019-06-10
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Family Courts more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many private law cases were referred to the Family Courts in which (a) both, (b) one and (c) neither parent or carer were represented by a solicitor in each of the last five years. more like this
unstar this property tabling member constituency Dwyfor Meirionnydd more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Liz Saville Roberts more like this
star this property uin 262429 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2019-06-18more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answer text <table><tbody><tr><td><p>The number of unrepresented parties in private law Children Act case starts are shown in the table below: <table><tbody><tr><td colspan="7"><p><strong>Table 1:</strong> Annual number of private law cases starting in Family Courts in England and Wales from 2014 to 2018 in which both, one or neither party had legal representation</p></td></tr><tr><td rowspan="2"><p><strong>Year</strong></p></td><td rowspan="2"><p><strong>Total number of cases started</strong></p></td><td colspan="3"><p><strong>Parties with legal representation</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p>Both applicant and respondent</p></td><td><p>Either applicant or respondent</p></td><td><p>Neither applicant nor respondent</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2014</p></td><td><p><strong> 42,114 </strong></p></td><td><p>7,424</p></td><td><p>18,630</p></td><td><p>16,060</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2015</p></td><td><p><strong> 43,347 </strong></p></td><td><p>7,654</p></td><td><p>18,500</p></td><td><p>17,193</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2016</p></td><td><p><strong> 48,246 </strong></p></td><td><p>8,262</p></td><td><p>20,048</p></td><td><p>19,936</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2017</p></td><td><p><strong> 50,652 </strong></p></td><td><p>8,303</p></td><td><p>20,497</p></td><td><p>21,852</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2018</p></td><td><p><strong> 51,672 </strong></p></td><td><p>8,561</p></td><td><p>20,346</p></td><td><p>22,765</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>Notes:</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="7"><p>1) An applicant party is considered 'represented' if at least one applicant has a recorded representative. Likewise for respondents.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="7"><p>2) Parties in private law cases are usually the parents or people with parental responsibility for the child/children involved. Others, including grandparents and carers, can apply after gaining permission from the court.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="7"><p>3) Private law adoptions are not included</p></td></tr></tbody></table>Since 2015, we have invested almost £6.5million in a support strategy for unrepresented parties. This provides practical support and information as well as routes to free or more affordable legal advice. Public funding remains available for parents in public law Children Act proceedings where a local authority seeks an order to place a child in care or under its supervision, and in private law Children Act cases where there is evidence of domestic or child abuse.<table><tbody><tr><td><p> </p></td></tr></tbody></table></p></td></tr></tbody></table>
star this property answering member constituency Blackpool North and Cleveleys more like this
star this property answering member printed Paul Maynard more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-18T16:30:36.553Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-18T16:30:36.553Z
star this property answering member
3926
star this property label Biography information for Paul Maynard more like this
star this property tabling member
4521
unstar this property label Biography information for Liz Saville Roberts more like this
1131497
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-11more like thismore than 2019-06-11
star this property answering body
Foreign and Commonwealth Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 16 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Foreign and Commonwealth Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Foreign and Commonwealth Office more like this
star this property hansard heading Ivan Golunov more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what representations, if any, they have made to the government of Russia about Ivan Golunov who is under house arrest in that country. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Truscott more like this
star this property uin HL16291 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2019-06-20more like thismore than 2019-06-20
star this property answer text <p>​​The UK welcomes the dropping of charges against Russian investigative journalist Ivan Golunov. The Foreign Secretary and the Minister of State for Europe and the Americas publicly voiced thier deep concern following Mr Golunov's arrest. We hope his release is indicative of a movement towards greater press freedom in Russia. We will continue to call on Russia to respect freedom of speech and expression, and will continue to defend media freedom.</p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-20T12:08:46.117Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-20T12:08:46.117Z
star this property answering member
4210
star this property label Biography information for Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon more like this
star this property tabling member
3682
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Truscott more like this
1130817
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-10more like thismore than 2019-06-10
star this property answering body
Foreign and Commonwealth Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 16 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Foreign and Commonwealth Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Foreign and Commonwealth Office more like this
star this property hansard heading Burma: Rohingya more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of reports that the Association of Southeast Asian Nations Emergency Response and Assessment Team has predicted that the repatriation of the Rohingya would be an easy process; what assessment they have made of the (1) dangers faced by, and (2) rights to full citizenship of, the Rohingya during their repatriation; and what steps are being taken to bring justice to those responsible for crimes against the Rohingya. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Alton of Liverpool more like this
star this property uin HL16184 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2019-06-20more like thismore than 2019-06-20
star this property answer text <p>​We welcome ASEAN's engagement on this issue through their Humanitarian Assistance Centre. However, we remain deeply concerned that the conditions for safe, voluntary and dignified returns in line with UNHCR principles are not in place. The UK has been clear, as has the UN Security Council, that before repatriations start, Myanmar must create the conditions in Rakhine to allow the Rohingya to return safely, voluntarily and with dignity. Refugees must have full access and independent information about conditions in areas of return and arrangements for repatriation.</p><p>We have publicly called for the removal of restrictions that withhold citizenship from individuals who are not from a community recognised by the Myanmar authorities as a 'national race', such as the Rohingya. The UK has supported the recommendations of the Rakhine Advisory Commission's to reform the 1982 Citizenship Law and urges the Myanmar government to fully implement them.</p><p>The UK co-sponsored the resolution at the UN Human Rights Council which set up the Fact Finding Mission in March 2017. This has since found that there may be sufficient grounds for prosecuting senior Myanmar military officials for crimes against humanity. The UK also to secure a resolution which established a mechanism to collect and preserve evidence of atrocities for future prosecutions. We continue to press the Myanmar authorities to ensure its domestic accountability process is independent, credible and results in prosecutions.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-20T11:50:12.927Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-20T11:50:12.927Z
star this property answering member
4210
star this property label Biography information for Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon more like this
star this property tabling member
738
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Alton of Liverpool more like this
1130236
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-05more like thismore than 2019-06-05
star this property answering body
Foreign and Commonwealth Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 16 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Foreign and Commonwealth Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Foreign and Commonwealth Office more like this
star this property hansard heading Syria: Armed Conflict more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government how they plan to prevent combatant forces in Idlib Province, Syria, from killing more civilians and children. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Hylton more like this
star this property uin HL16097 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2019-06-19more like thismore than 2019-06-19
star this property answer text <p>​We are gravely concerned by the escalation in military action by Russia and the Syrian regime in Idlib. We are appalled that civilian infrastructure has been hit, including 24 health facilities, and by reports of civilian casualties and mass displacement. We are using public statements, diplomatic relationships and international fora, including the UN Security Council, to increase the pressure on all parties to end the violence, return to the ceasefire agreed in September 2018 and abide by their obligations under international humanitarian law. Through the Conflict, Stability and Security Fund, the UK is supporting innovative new technology that provides civilians in Idlib with early warnings of airstrikes in order to save lives. We also continue to support international efforts to document violations of international humanitarian law being committed in Idlib.</p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-19T11:25:54.893Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-19T11:25:54.893Z
star this property answering member
4210
star this property label Biography information for Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon more like this
star this property tabling member
2018
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Hylton more like this