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1128144
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-23more like thismore than 2019-05-23
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Education more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
star this property hansard heading Apprentices: Taxation more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government how much (1) the apprenticeship levy has raised in total in each of the four jurisdictions of the UK, (2) levy-paying employers have reclaimed, (3) has been used to fund new non-levy payer apprenticeships, (4) has been spent on old-style apprenticeships, and (5) has been spent on the administration of apprenticeships, in each year since the introduction of the apprenticeship levy. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Neville-Rolfe more like this
star this property uin HL15958 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-10more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answer text <p>The apprenticeship levy is collected from all UK employers through the PAYE system by Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs (HMRC). HMRC publish information on levy receipts in the monthly Tax and National Insurance contribution receipts publication, and in their annual reports and accounts, available at:</p><p><a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/hmrc-tax-and-nics-receipts-for-the-uk" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/hmrc-tax-and-nics-receipts-for-the-uk</a>.</p><p><a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hmrc-annual-report-and-accounts-2017-to-2018" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hmrc-annual-report-and-accounts-2017-to-2018</a>.</p><p> </p><p>In 2017-18, the first year following the introduction of the levy, £2.6 billion was collected from UK employers and HM Treasury (HMT) allocated £425m of the levy collected to the devolved administrations. Annual data on levy collected in 2018-19 will be published by HMRC, and data on 2018-19 spending will be available from Department for Education in due course.</p><p> </p><p>Skills spending is a devolved matter and HMT committed in advance to the share of the levy that would be passed to the devolved administrations in the three-year period from 2017-18 to 2019-20. HMT published these plans at: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/news/uk-government-agrees-apprenticeship-levy-funding-deal-with-devolved-administrations" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/news/uk-government-agrees-apprenticeship-levy-funding-deal-with-devolved-administrations</a>.</p><p> </p><p>In England, levy-paying employers can use online apprenticeship service accounts to access their funds. In 2017-18, the total spend on apprentices employed with levy payers, and who started training after the levy was introduced, was £268 million. This figure represents more than the £170 million in training and assessment costs charged to levy payers’ accounts.</p><p>This is because these employers also benefit from additional payments to support certain types of learners, and extremely generous co-investment contributions for those employers that have exhausted their levy account funds. Such costs are not currently deducted from levy accounts. In 2018-19, levy-payers drew down a further £639 million representing the costs charged to levy-payers on the learners who started since the levy was introduced (and whose training is ongoing in 2018-19) as well as the costs of learners who started in the 2018-19 financial year.</p><p> </p><p>Employers’ levy funds are distinct from the department’s ring-fenced annual apprenticeship budget, which is set in advance by HM Treasury to fund apprenticeships in England. This budget has risen year-on-year, from £2.01 billion in 2017-18 and £2.23 billion in 2018-19 to over £2.5 billion in 2019-20, double what was spent in 2010.</p><p> </p><p>In 2017-18, we spent £189 million on training and assessment (including additional payments) for apprentices with employers who do not pay the levy and who started their apprenticeship since the levy was introduced. This includes apprenticeships started on both frameworks and new standards.</p><p>The ongoing cost of training and assessment for apprentices who started their apprenticeship before the levy was introduced in May 2017 was £1,065 million in 2017-18 (including additional payments as detailed above).</p><p> </p><p>In 2017-18, £40 million (equating to less than 2%) of the £2.01 billion ring-fenced apprenticeships programme budget was spent on the cost of delivering and running the programme. This includes spending by the Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education. The department is provided a separate budget for other administrative spending, and in 2017-18 total administrative spend was £44 million. These two budgets cover the cost of running the online apprenticeship service, employer engagement work, and the promotion of apprenticeships, in addition to staffing and other costs.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property grouped question UIN HL15959 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-10T10:54:07.183Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-10T10:54:07.183Z
unstar this property answering member
4689
star this property label Biography information for Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property tabling member
4284
unstar this property label Biography information for Baroness Neville-Rolfe more like this
1128145
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-23more like thismore than 2019-05-23
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Education more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
star this property hansard heading Apprentices: Taxation more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the annual total cost of apprenticeships compared to the amount raised from the apprenticeship levy. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Neville-Rolfe more like this
star this property uin HL15959 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-10more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answer text <p>The apprenticeship levy is collected from all UK employers through the PAYE system by Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs (HMRC). HMRC publish information on levy receipts in the monthly Tax and National Insurance contribution receipts publication, and in their annual reports and accounts, available at:</p><p><a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/hmrc-tax-and-nics-receipts-for-the-uk" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/hmrc-tax-and-nics-receipts-for-the-uk</a>.</p><p><a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hmrc-annual-report-and-accounts-2017-to-2018" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hmrc-annual-report-and-accounts-2017-to-2018</a>.</p><p> </p><p>In 2017-18, the first year following the introduction of the levy, £2.6 billion was collected from UK employers and HM Treasury (HMT) allocated £425m of the levy collected to the devolved administrations. Annual data on levy collected in 2018-19 will be published by HMRC, and data on 2018-19 spending will be available from Department for Education in due course.</p><p> </p><p>Skills spending is a devolved matter and HMT committed in advance to the share of the levy that would be passed to the devolved administrations in the three-year period from 2017-18 to 2019-20. HMT published these plans at: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/news/uk-government-agrees-apprenticeship-levy-funding-deal-with-devolved-administrations" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/news/uk-government-agrees-apprenticeship-levy-funding-deal-with-devolved-administrations</a>.</p><p> </p><p>In England, levy-paying employers can use online apprenticeship service accounts to access their funds. In 2017-18, the total spend on apprentices employed with levy payers, and who started training after the levy was introduced, was £268 million. This figure represents more than the £170 million in training and assessment costs charged to levy payers’ accounts.</p><p>This is because these employers also benefit from additional payments to support certain types of learners, and extremely generous co-investment contributions for those employers that have exhausted their levy account funds. Such costs are not currently deducted from levy accounts. In 2018-19, levy-payers drew down a further £639 million representing the costs charged to levy-payers on the learners who started since the levy was introduced (and whose training is ongoing in 2018-19) as well as the costs of learners who started in the 2018-19 financial year.</p><p> </p><p>Employers’ levy funds are distinct from the department’s ring-fenced annual apprenticeship budget, which is set in advance by HM Treasury to fund apprenticeships in England. This budget has risen year-on-year, from £2.01 billion in 2017-18 and £2.23 billion in 2018-19 to over £2.5 billion in 2019-20, double what was spent in 2010.</p><p> </p><p>In 2017-18, we spent £189 million on training and assessment (including additional payments) for apprentices with employers who do not pay the levy and who started their apprenticeship since the levy was introduced. This includes apprenticeships started on both frameworks and new standards.</p><p>The ongoing cost of training and assessment for apprentices who started their apprenticeship before the levy was introduced in May 2017 was £1,065 million in 2017-18 (including additional payments as detailed above).</p><p> </p><p>In 2017-18, £40 million (equating to less than 2%) of the £2.01 billion ring-fenced apprenticeships programme budget was spent on the cost of delivering and running the programme. This includes spending by the Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education. The department is provided a separate budget for other administrative spending, and in 2017-18 total administrative spend was £44 million. These two budgets cover the cost of running the online apprenticeship service, employer engagement work, and the promotion of apprenticeships, in addition to staffing and other costs.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property grouped question UIN HL15958 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-10T10:54:07.247Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-10T10:54:07.247Z
unstar this property answering member
4689
star this property label Biography information for Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property tabling member
4284
unstar this property label Biography information for Baroness Neville-Rolfe more like this
1128208
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-22more like thismore than 2019-05-22
star this property answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept id 13 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property hansard heading Hunting more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 11 December 2018 to Question 199874 on Hunting, what criteria his Department applies to ensure that scientific evidence is sufficient to (a) demonstrate that trophy hunting is an effective conservation tool and (b) is independent of the trophy hunting industry. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Linlithgow and East Falkirk more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Martyn Day more like this
star this property uin 257507 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-10more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answer text <p>Imports of hunting trophies into the UK are subject to strict controls under the EU Wildlife Trade Regulations, which apply in the UK. All applications for permits to import hunting trophies into the UK are assessed to make sure that the import would not have a harmful effect on the conservation status of the species or on the extent of the territory occupied by the relevant population of the species. In addition, the applicant must provide documentary evidence, in the form of an export permit that demonstrates that the specimens have been obtained in accordance with the legislation on the protection of the species concerned.</p><p> </p><p>There are import suspensions in place for countries where hunting of the species concerned is not considered to be sustainable. The need for any further suspensions is kept under active review.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The Secretary of State held a roundtable with stakeholders last month on this issue.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Suffolk Coastal more like this
star this property answering member printed Dr Thérèse Coffey more like this
star this property grouped question UIN 257508 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-10T10:39:39.43Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-10T10:39:39.43Z
unstar this property answering member
4098
star this property label Biography information for Dr Thérèse Coffey more like this
star this property tabling member
4488
unstar this property label Biography information for Martyn Day more like this
1128209
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-22more like thismore than 2019-05-22
star this property answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept id 13 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property hansard heading Polar Bears more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 1 April 2019 to Question 236523 on Polar Bears, what progress he has made on holding a roundtable discussion with organisations from all sides of the debate on whether the six species that are protected by stricter trophy hunting import controls at EU level will be maintained or extended in the event of the UK leaving the EU. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Linlithgow and East Falkirk more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Martyn Day more like this
star this property uin 257508 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-10more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answer text <p>Imports of hunting trophies into the UK are subject to strict controls under the EU Wildlife Trade Regulations, which apply in the UK. All applications for permits to import hunting trophies into the UK are assessed to make sure that the import would not have a harmful effect on the conservation status of the species or on the extent of the territory occupied by the relevant population of the species. In addition, the applicant must provide documentary evidence, in the form of an export permit that demonstrates that the specimens have been obtained in accordance with the legislation on the protection of the species concerned.</p><p> </p><p>There are import suspensions in place for countries where hunting of the species concerned is not considered to be sustainable. The need for any further suspensions is kept under active review.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The Secretary of State held a roundtable with stakeholders last month on this issue.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Suffolk Coastal more like this
star this property answering member printed Dr Thérèse Coffey more like this
star this property grouped question UIN 257507 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-10T10:39:39.48Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-10T10:39:39.48Z
unstar this property answering member
4098
star this property label Biography information for Dr Thérèse Coffey more like this
star this property tabling member
4488
unstar this property label Biography information for Martyn Day more like this
1128212
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-22more like thismore than 2019-05-22
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading Universal Credit more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people have had their deductions under universal credit reduced from the maximum rate of 40 per cent of an individual's standard allowance in the last (a) month and (b) 12 months. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency High Peak more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Ruth George more like this
star this property uin 257510 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-10more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answer text <p>The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.</p><p> </p><p>The Government recognises the importance of safeguarding the welfare of claimants who have incurred debt. Universal Credit already has procedures and regulations in place to protect claimants from excessive deductions. The maximum rate of deductions cannot normally exceed 40 per cent of the Universal Credit standard allowance, and from October 2019 this will be reduced to 30 per cent.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Reading West more like this
star this property answering member printed Alok Sharma more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-10T14:52:01.35Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-10T14:52:01.35Z
unstar this property answering member
4014
star this property label Biography information for Alok Sharma more like this
star this property tabling member
4662
unstar this property label Biography information for Ruth George more like this
1128257
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-24more like thismore than 2019-05-24
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading Winter Fuel Payments more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, on how many occasions the winter fuel payment has been incorrectly paid; and what steps he has taken to recover those payments in each of the last three years. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Moray more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Douglas Ross more like this
star this property uin 257526 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-10more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answer text <p>The DWP makes around 12 million Winter Fuel payments each year.</p><p>The DWP is working hard to prevent overpayments from occurring in the first place. However, these do sometimes occur due to a claimant failing to inform DWP of a change of household composition, or that they have moved abroad. Winter Fuel staff annually undertake an extensive Data Matching exercise to identify if any overpayments have occurred, and reduce the possibility of incorrect payments.</p><p>The table below shows the volume of Winter Fuel payments that were overpaid in the last 3 financial years rounded to the nearest 100. This represents less than 0.05% of the total Winter Fuel payments made.</p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p>Year</p></td><td><p>Volume Of Winter Fuel Payments Overpaid</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2016-17</p></td><td><p>3,600</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2017-18</p></td><td><p>5,000</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2018-19</p></td><td><p>5,200</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p><em>*The data in this response has been sourced from internal management information. It should therefore not be compared to any other similar data subsequently released by the Department.</em></p><p /><p>The DWP has an obligation to ensure that public money is administered responsibly. Therefore, where permitted under Social Security legislation, the DWP seeks to recover any overpaid benefit. Where possible, the DWP will recover through on-going deductions from a claimant’s benefit.</p><p>The DWP ensures that appropriate safeguards are in place to protect claimants who have deductions from their benefit to repay overpayments. There are maximum rates of deduction that are set out in legislation, and if a claimant is struggling they can contact the DWP’s Debt Management Team to discuss lowering their repayment rate.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency Hexham more like this
star this property answering member printed Guy Opperman more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-10T15:06:10.007Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-10T15:06:10.007Z
unstar this property answering member
4142
star this property label Biography information for Guy Opperman more like this
star this property tabling member
4627
unstar this property label Biography information for Douglas Ross more like this
1128270
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-22more like thismore than 2019-05-22
star this property answering body
Department for Transport more like this
star this property answering dept id 27 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Transport more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Transport more like this
star this property hansard heading Roads: Chatham and Aylesford more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what funding he has allocated to repair roads in Chatham and Aylesford. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Chatham and Aylesford more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Tracey Crouch more like this
star this property uin 257532 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-10more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answer text <p>Local highway authorities are responsible for the maintenance of the local road network in their area. Chatham’s roads are the responsibility of Medway Council, as highway authority, and Aylesford’s roads are the responsibility of Kent County Council, as highway authority.</p><p>The funding provided by the Department for Transport for highway maintenance, including pothole repair, to Medway Council and Kent County Council since 2015 is shown in the table below. The table highlights the Department for Transport allocated Medway Council an additional £1.1m and Kent County Council an additional £12m funding in the 2018/19 financial year to support local highways maintenance services, including the repair of roads.</p><table><tbody><tr><td><p><strong>Year</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Funding Stream </strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Funding £m </strong> <strong>Medway</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Kent</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2015/16</p></td><td><p>Highways Maintenance Block</p></td><td><p>2.54</p></td><td><p>27.27</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2016/17</p></td><td><p>Highways Maintenance Block (including Incentive Element)</p></td><td><p>2.47</p></td><td><p>26.38</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2016/17</p></td><td><p>Pothole Action Fund</p></td><td><p>0.13</p></td><td><p>1.47</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2017/18</p></td><td><p>Highways Maintenance Block (including Incentive Element)</p></td><td><p>2.45</p></td><td><p>26.35</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2017/18</p></td><td><p>Pothole Action Fund</p></td><td><p>0.34</p></td><td><p>3.72</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2017/18</p></td><td><p>Flood Resilience Fund</p></td><td><p>0.13</p></td><td><p>3.72</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2018/19</p></td><td><p>Highways Maintenance Block (including Incentive Element)</p></td><td><p>2.47</p></td><td><p>25.55</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2018/19</p></td><td><p>Pothole Action Fund</p></td><td><p>0.14</p></td><td><p>1.56</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2018/19</p></td><td><p>Budget £420 million</p></td><td><p>1.12</p></td><td><p>12.09</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2019/20</p></td><td><p>Highways Maintenance Block (including Incentive Element)</p></td><td><p>2.47</p></td><td><p>26.52</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2019/20</p></td><td><p>Pothole Action Fund</p></td><td><p>0.07</p></td><td><p>0.79</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2019/20</p></td><td><p>Flood Resilience Fund</p></td><td><p>0.07</p></td><td><p>0.79</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Total</p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p>14.40</p></td><td><p>156.21</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p><em> </em></p><p>The Department funds local highway maintenance in England, outside of London, through Highway Maintenance Block Funding (HMBF), worth about a £1 billion a year.</p><p> </p><ul><li>HMBF is paid through a formula based on the assets a local authority is responsible for such as: length of road network; number of bridges and; the number of street lighting columns</li><li>From 2015 – 2021 the Department is providing £6.6 billion for local highway maintenance in England, outside of London.</li><li>In the October Budget, the Chancellor announced he was providing an additional £420 million for local highway maintenance, in England.</li></ul><p> </p><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency Northampton North more like this
star this property answering member printed Michael Ellis more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-10T12:10:31.413Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-10T12:10:31.413Z
unstar this property answering member
4116
star this property label Biography information for Michael Ellis more like this
star this property tabling member
3950
unstar this property label Biography information for Tracey Crouch more like this
1128272
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-22more like thismore than 2019-05-22
star this property answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept id 13 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property hansard heading Livestock: Antimicrobials more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of a preventative approach to animal health in combating antimicrobial resistance; and whether it is his policy that reducing the effect of that resistance is a key public good. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency North Cornwall more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Scott Mann more like this
star this property uin 257534 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-10more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answer text <p>Reducing the spread of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and the need to use antibiotics through infection prevention and control in human and animal health is one of a number of cores principles in the UK’s 5 Year National AMR Action Plan and 20 Year Vision. Our Action Plan recognises antimicrobial resistance as a global public good. This is reflected in the high priority the UK gives to addressing the problem of AMR. Since 2014, the sales of antibiotics for use in food-producing animals in the UK have dropped by 40%. And in the Action Plan, the government has committed to working with vets and farmers to further reduce antibiotic use in animals by 25% between 2016 and 2020, with objectives to be refreshed by 2021.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Macclesfield more like this
star this property answering member printed David Rutley more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-10T16:56:41.723Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-10T16:56:41.723Z
unstar this property answering member
4033
star this property label Biography information for David Rutley more like this
star this property tabling member
4496
unstar this property label Biography information for Scott Mann more like this
1128273
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-22more like thismore than 2019-05-22
star this property answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept id 13 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property hansard heading Agriculture more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to support the agricultural sector after the UK leaves the EU; and whether he plans to introduce a distinct and internationally recognised UK standard for agricultural goods based on a high level of animal health and welfare. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency North Cornwall more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Scott Mann more like this
star this property uin 257535 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-10more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answer text <p>The Government’s plans for agriculture and for supporting the sector as the UK leaves the European Union are underpinned by the Agriculture Bill. The Bill is a central part of the Government’s programme of legislation to deliver as smooth a departure as possible and achieve a green Brexit. At the heart of our new policy in England will be a system that pays public money for public goods. Our future agriculture policy will help farmers continue to provide a supply of healthy, home-grown produce made to high environmental and animal welfare standards.</p><p> </p><p>We are committed to putting in place a Gold Standard of metrics which will provide a framework of sustainability metrics, establishing a common vocabulary for environmental and animal welfare measurements in food and farming that can be used across public and private sectors.</p><p> </p><p>We already have some of the highest welfare standards in the world, as well as a number of voluntary labelling schemes which provide assurances as to the welfare of the animals, both of which ensure consumers are not misled by the labelling of products that contain meat or dairy products. Once we leave the EU, we will review food labelling to ensure that we have a framework that meets the needs of UK consumers and producers. Labelling for welfare outcomes is one area that the review will cover.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency Macclesfield more like this
star this property answering member printed David Rutley more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-10T16:58:59.093Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-10T16:58:59.093Z
unstar this property answering member
4033
star this property label Biography information for David Rutley more like this
star this property tabling member
4496
unstar this property label Biography information for Scott Mann more like this
1128278
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-22more like thismore than 2019-05-22
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Education more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
star this property hansard heading Secondary Education: Assessments more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the annual cost of the requirement that all 16 to 18-year-old students who have not yet achieved a grade four while at secondary school resit those exams. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Harborough more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Neil O'Brien more like this
star this property uin 257540 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-10more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answer text <p>We know students who leave school with a good grasp of English and maths increase their chances of securing a job or going on to further education.</p><p>Since August 2014, students who left key stage 4 without a GCSE grade 4/C or above (or equivalent) in English and/or maths were required to continue studying these subjects as part of their 16-19 study programme. From August 2019, students starting a new or continuing an existing study programme with a GCSE grade 2 (or equivalent) or below can study towards a pass in Functional Skills level 2 or they can still study towards a GCSE grade 4 to 9. Those with a grade 3 (or equivalent) must still study GCSE only. Providers have the freedom to determine when a student is ready to re-sit or take an examination.</p><p>The department has not made estimates of the costs to providers or the number of full-time teachers required to deliver specific examinations. Rather, 16-19 education providers are funded for the overall study programmes that students take. These programmes include the provision of maths and English, where required. In 2015, we committed to maintaining the 16-19 funding base rate at current levels until 2020.</p><p>In addition to regular study programme funding of which maths and English provision is a part, we have made a number of commitments to improve the quality of teaching and learning in further education (FE) providers. Since 2013-14 we have invested over £140 million in FE teachers and leaders, including for workforce development through the independent Education and Training Foundation. We are also investing over £50 million to help FE providers improve basic maths teaching.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Guildford more like this
star this property answering member printed Anne Milton more like this
star this property grouped question UIN 257541 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-10T15:05:59.343Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-10T15:05:59.343Z
unstar this property answering member
1523
star this property label Biography information for Anne Milton more like this
star this property tabling member
4679
unstar this property label Biography information for Neil O'Brien more like this