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1059235
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-02-11more like thismore than 2019-02-11
star this property answering body
The Senior Deputy Speaker more like this
star this property answering dept id 204 more like this
star this property answering dept short name
star this property answering dept sort name Senior Deputy Speaker (HoL) more like this
star this property hansard heading House of Lords: Disability more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker whether he is satisfied that the present arrangements in the Chamber and Committee Rooms meet the needs of those with hearing or visual impairments. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Trefgarne more like this
star this property uin HL13620 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
unstar this property answer text <p>The House of Lords provides support for Members, staff and visitors to Parliament affected by hearing loss through the use of audio loop and infrared systems that help to amplify sound for hearing aid users. Loop systems are installed in the Chamber and all Committee rooms, with infrared systems additionally available within Committee rooms 1 to 4, 2A, 3A and the Moses Room. Handheld radio transmitters are also available to hearing-aid users when in the Chamber, to reduce interference from electrical equipment and improve the quality of sound provided by the audio loop.</p><p> </p><p>We are currently exploring options to provide an audio description service for Chamber and Committee proceedings. This will provide blind and partially sighted members, committee witnesses and members of the public with a voiced description of which member or witness is currently speaking, transmitted directly via an audio service. A feasibility study was commissioned in January 2019 and will report back later this year.</p><p> </p><p>Further microphones are due to be added to the Chamber this year, which will improve the quality of service provided to hearing aid users. A greater number of microphones situated closer to the people speaking minimises background noise and gives a cleaner sound on the audio which is sent directly to hearing aids via the loop system. The large number of microphones used in Committee meetings, whether automated or operated by an engineer, help to keep the sound clear and maximise the quality of sound experienced by hearing aid users.</p><p> </p><p>For those with hearing impairments which do not require the use of a hearing aid, overall audibility in Committee Rooms 2A, 3A and 4A is generally good. In Committee rooms 1 to 4, however, factors such as high ceilings and furniture arrangements mean that the current acoustic set-up is sub-optimal. A facilities upgrade is currently being trialled in House of Commons Committee Room 6 and, subject to approval, House of Lords Committee rooms will also benefit from these improvements in due course. There are also plans to replace the speakers embedded in the benches within the Chamber next year, which should deliver improvements to general levels of audibility.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The business of the House is of course dependent upon Members, staff and visitors such as committee witnesses being able to hear and be heard, although the capacity to deliver improvements can sometimes be limited by the nature of operations in a building with heritage restrictions. Equality Impact Assessments will be carried out as part of the Restoration and Renewal process, during which extensive works are likely to offer the potential for further improvements to facilities. In the interim, the Director of Facilities would be happy to speak to any member with specific suggestions for improvement.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord McFall of Alcluith more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-02-25T17:21:43.01Zmore like thismore than 2019-02-25T17:21:43.01Z
unstar this property answering member
4148
star this property label Biography information for Lord McFall of Alcluith more like this
star this property tabling member
1813
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Trefgarne more like this
1060917
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-02-13more like thismore than 2019-02-13
star this property answering body
The Senior Deputy Speaker more like this
star this property answering dept id 204 more like this
star this property answering dept short name
star this property answering dept sort name Senior Deputy Speaker (HoL) more like this
star this property hansard heading Peers: Bullying more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker how many formal complaints of bullying or harassment by any member of the House of Lords he has received from (1) members, (2) their staff, or (3) House staff since he launched the consultation on the implementation of a new process for investigating complaints of bullying, harassment or sexual misconduct on 11 February. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Foulkes of Cumnock more like this
star this property uin HL13693 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
unstar this property answer text <p>I have not received any formal complaints from members, their staff or House staff but under neither the current system nor the proposed future system would complaints come to me. Currently complaints may be received by the House Administration, the Commissioner for Standards, any of the political parties or whips, or the Convenor of the Crossbench Peers.</p><p> </p><p>Complaints of bullying or harassment by members of the House of Lords may be made to the Commissioner for Standards. Consideration of complaints by the Commissioner follows a two stage process. The Commissioner conducts a preliminary assessment to determine whether there is evidence sufficient to establish a prima facie case that the Code has been breached. This stage of the process is confidential, known only to the Commissioner, complainant and respondent. Basic details of cases are made public only if a complaint proceeds to the second stage, which is a formal investigation.</p><p> </p><p>When I launched the consultation on 11 February there were no live formal investigations by the Commissioner solely in relation to the Code’s personal honour provision, which is the only aspect of the Code likely to be engaged by complaints of bullying and harassment. No such investigations have been initiated since the consultation was launched.</p><p> </p><p>Furthermore, no formal complaints relating to the behaviour of House of Lords members were being dealt with by the Administration when the consultation was launched, and none have been initiated since.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord McFall of Alcluith more like this
star this property grouped question UIN HL13729 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-02-25T17:14:53.357Zmore like thismore than 2019-02-25T17:14:53.357Z
unstar this property answering member
4148
star this property label Biography information for Lord McFall of Alcluith more like this
star this property tabling member
579
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Foulkes of Cumnock more like this
1061349
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-02-14more like thismore than 2019-02-14
star this property answering body
The Senior Deputy Speaker more like this
star this property answering dept id 204 more like this
star this property answering dept short name
star this property answering dept sort name Senior Deputy Speaker (HoL) more like this
star this property hansard heading Peers: Bullying more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker how many formal complaints of bullying or harassment by any member of the House of Lords were being investigated from (1) members, (2) their staff, or (3) House staff at the time he launched the consultation on the implementation of a new process for investigating complaints of bullying, harassment or sexual misconduct on 11 February. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Foulkes of Cumnock more like this
star this property uin HL13729 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
unstar this property answer text <p>I have not received any formal complaints from members, their staff or House staff but under neither the current system nor the proposed future system would complaints come to me. Currently complaints may be received by the House Administration, the Commissioner for Standards, any of the political parties or whips, or the Convenor of the Crossbench Peers.</p><p> </p><p>Complaints of bullying or harassment by members of the House of Lords may be made to the Commissioner for Standards. Consideration of complaints by the Commissioner follows a two stage process. The Commissioner conducts a preliminary assessment to determine whether there is evidence sufficient to establish a prima facie case that the Code has been breached. This stage of the process is confidential, known only to the Commissioner, complainant and respondent. Basic details of cases are made public only if a complaint proceeds to the second stage, which is a formal investigation.</p><p> </p><p>When I launched the consultation on 11 February there were no live formal investigations by the Commissioner solely in relation to the Code’s personal honour provision, which is the only aspect of the Code likely to be engaged by complaints of bullying and harassment. No such investigations have been initiated since the consultation was launched.</p><p> </p><p>Furthermore, no formal complaints relating to the behaviour of House of Lords members were being dealt with by the Administration when the consultation was launched, and none have been initiated since.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord McFall of Alcluith more like this
star this property grouped question UIN HL13693 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-02-25T17:14:53.403Zmore like thismore than 2019-02-25T17:14:53.403Z
unstar this property answering member
4148
star this property label Biography information for Lord McFall of Alcluith more like this
star this property tabling member
579
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Foulkes of Cumnock more like this
1064351
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-02-20more like thismore than 2019-02-20
star this property answering body
Attorney General more like this
star this property answering dept id 88 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Attorney General more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Attorney General more like this
star this property hansard heading Attorney General: Apprentices more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Attorney General, what proportion of staff employed by his Department are apprentices. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Batley and Spen more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Tracy Brabin more like this
star this property uin 223825 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
unstar this property answer text <p>The Attorney General’s Office does not directly employ apprentices. The Attorney General’s Office has around 50 staff, the majority of whom are on two year loans to the Office. One such staff member is an apprentice, employed by the Government Legal Department and loaned to the Attorney General’s Office. The Law Officer Departments, (Attorney General’s Office, Government Legal Department, Crown Prosecution Service, Serious Fraud Office and HM Inspectorate of Crown Prosecution Service) compile and submit quarterly apprenticeship returns to the Cabinet Office and these are published on <a href="http://www.Gov.uk" target="_blank">www.Gov.uk</a> . Apprentices located within HM Inspectorate of Crown Prosecution Service and the Attorney General’s Office are reported to Cabinet Office within the total figures for the Government Legal Department.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency South Swindon more like this
star this property answering member printed Robert Buckland more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-02-25T11:52:56.41Zmore like thismore than 2019-02-25T11:52:56.41Z
unstar this property answering member
4106
star this property label Biography information for Robert Buckland more like this
star this property tabling member
4588
unstar this property label Biography information for Tracy Brabin more like this
1064422
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-02-20more like thismore than 2019-02-20
star this property answering body
Attorney General more like this
star this property answering dept id 88 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Attorney General more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Attorney General more like this
star this property hansard heading Crown Prosecution Service more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Attorney General, pursuant to the answer of 4 February 2019 to Question 213932 on Crown Prosecution Service: West Midlands, what the change has been in the caseload for the Crown Prosecution Service for each principal offence category in each year from 2010. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Birmingham, Selly Oak more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Steve McCabe more like this
star this property uin 223947 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
unstar this property answer text <p>The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) maintains a central record of the volumes of completed prosecutions, or caseload, as a count of the number of defendants and collates the data collected in financial years. At the conclusion of each prosecution case the defendant is allocated one of 12 Principal Offence Categories that indicates the most serious offence with which the defendant is charged at the time of finalisation.</p><p> </p><p>The tables in Annex 1 show the number of finalised prosecution outcomes in the CPS nationally for each Principal Offence Category, during each year from 2010-11 to 2017-18, and the year on year change in both volume and percent.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency South Swindon more like this
star this property answering member printed Robert Buckland more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-02-25T11:47:39.357Zmore like thismore than 2019-02-25T11:47:39.357Z
unstar this property answering member
4106
star this property label Biography information for Robert Buckland more like this
star this property attachment
1
star this property file name PQ 223847 Annex 1.docx more like this
star this property title Annex 1 more like this
star this property tabling member
298
unstar this property label Biography information for Steve McCabe more like this
1064429
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-02-20more like thismore than 2019-02-20
star this property answering body
Attorney General more like this
star this property answering dept id 88 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Attorney General more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Attorney General more like this
star this property hansard heading Road Traffic Offences: Prosecutions more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Attorney General, pursuant to the Answer of 11 of February 2019 to Question 217439 on Crown Prosecution Service: West Midlands, how many minor motoring cases there were in England and Wales in each year since 2010. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Birmingham, Selly Oak more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Steve McCabe more like this
star this property uin 223954 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
unstar this property answer text <p>The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) maintains a central record of prosecuted defendants by twelve Principal Offence Categories, including the category of Motoring Offences.</p><p> </p><p>The table below shows the number of summary-only prosecutions at magistrates’ courts allocated to the Motoring Offences category during each available year from 2010-11 to 2017-18 and the change in both volume and percent.</p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p><strong>Year</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Motoring Prosecution Caseload</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Volume Change</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>% Change</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2010-2011</strong></p></td><td><p>287,677</p></td><td><p>-</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2011-2012</strong></p></td><td><p>255,270</p></td><td><p>-32,407</p></td><td><p>-11.3%</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2012-2013</strong></p></td><td><p>224,832</p></td><td><p>-30,438</p></td><td><p>-11.9%</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2013-2014</strong></p></td><td><p>166,028</p></td><td><p>-58,804</p></td><td><p>-26.2%</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2014-2015</strong></p></td><td><p>107,698</p></td><td><p>-58,330</p></td><td><p>-35.1%</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2015-2016</strong></p></td><td><p>107,227</p></td><td><p>-471</p></td><td><p>-0.4%</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2016-2017</strong></p></td><td><p>100,058</p></td><td><p>-7,169</p></td><td><p>-6.7%</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2017-2018</strong></p></td><td><p>94,738</p></td><td><p>-5,320</p></td><td><p>-5.3%</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="3"><p>Data Source: CPS Management Information System</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p>It is not possible to disaggregate figures to show separately the volume and outcome of proceedings for individual offences within the Motoring Offences category.</p>
star this property answering member constituency South Swindon more like this
star this property answering member printed Robert Buckland more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-02-25T11:51:39.657Zmore like thismore than 2019-02-25T11:51:39.657Z
unstar this property answering member
4106
star this property label Biography information for Robert Buckland more like this
star this property tabling member
298
unstar this property label Biography information for Steve McCabe more like this
1059187
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-02-11more like thismore than 2019-02-11
star this property answering body
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
star this property answering dept id 201 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
star this property hansard heading Petrol more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government how many days of reserve petrol stock are currently held by the UK, both inside and outside its borders; and how many days of stock will be held within the UK post-Brexit. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Birt more like this
star this property uin HL13576 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
unstar this property answer text <p>The UK currently holds 39 days of petrol stocks. The UK is also currently a net exporter of petrol as our refineries produce more than the UK consumes.</p><p> </p><p>The UK has two international obligations to hold emergency oil stocks that can be released in response to disruptions to the oil market, as required by the EU Oil Stocking Directive (2009/119/EC) and under International Energy Agency (IEA) rules. The EU Oil Stocking Directive requires Member States to maintain stocks at the higher of 90 days of net imports or 61 days of inland consumption. The IEA obligation requires 90 days of net oil imports.</p><p> </p><p>UK oil stocking obligations after we exit the European Union will depend on the terms of our exit, including whether there is a transition period. Under any scenario, the UK will continue to be bound by the IEA requirement to hold oil stocks equal to 90 days of net imports. Many countries around the world subscribe to the same obligation, a level widely considered appropriate to protect against oil disruption.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Henley more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-02-25T12:10:36.27Zmore like thismore than 2019-02-25T12:10:36.27Z
unstar this property answering member
2616
star this property label Biography information for Lord Henley more like this
star this property tabling member
2533
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Birt more like this
1059188
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-02-11more like thismore than 2019-02-11
star this property answering body
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
star this property answering dept id 201 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
star this property hansard heading Company Accounts more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what (1) is the composition, and (2) are the terms of reference of the working group that has been set up to look at requirements for companies to disclose distributable reserves. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Bowles of Berkhamsted more like this
star this property uin HL13577 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
unstar this property answer text <p>The Government has not established a working group to look at this matter.</p><p> </p><p>In its response to the Insolvency and Corporate Governance consultation last year the Government said that it would explore the strength of the case for a comprehensive review of the UK’s dividend regime, including whether any such review should consider the option of requiring companies to disclose their distributable reserves. That consideration is ongoing.</p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Henley more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-02-25T12:14:27.617Zmore like thismore than 2019-02-25T12:14:27.617Z
unstar this property answering member
2616
star this property label Biography information for Lord Henley more like this
star this property tabling member
4562
unstar this property label Biography information for Baroness Bowles of Berkhamsted more like this
1059618
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-02-12more like thismore than 2019-02-12
star this property answering body
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
star this property answering dept id 201 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
star this property hansard heading Fuel Poverty more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the recommendations of the Committee on Fuel Poverty annual report 2018, published on 7 November 2018; what steps they are taking, if any, to implement those recommendations in advance of (1) the Comprehensive Spending Review, and (2) the revisions to the current Fuel Poverty Strategy for England; and what assessment they have made of (a) the case for, and (b) the potential benefits which might arise for the UK of, increasing investment in energy efficiency improvements to ensure statutory requirements are met. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Bird more like this
star this property uin HL13640 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
unstar this property answer text <p>Government is committed to tackling fuel poverty and we welcome the advice of the Committee on Fuel Poverty. We recognise the environmental, social and health benefits of energy efficiency. The Clean Growth Strategy reiterated our commitment to improving the energy performance of as many fuel poor homes as reasonably practicable to Band C by 2030.</p><p>The Energy Company Obligation (ECO) now focuses exclusively on low income households with funding of £640m per year. In November, the Committee recommended new guidance on the ECO Flexible Eligibility scheme; and new guidance was published earlier this month. In line with the Committee’s annual report, BEIS has also published new analysis on the churn of households in and out of fuel poverty to better understand this issue and will soon be publishing a policy plan for improving Private Rented Sector energy efficiency. Government remains committed to the Buildings Mission announced in 2018 to halve the cost of retrofitting buildings to use half the energy of current new builds. We are considering the Committee’s other recommendations as part of our work this year to update the Fuel Poverty Strategy for England and they will also be relevant to Spending Review considerations.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Henley more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-02-25T12:09:43.12Zmore like thismore than 2019-02-25T12:09:43.12Z
unstar this property answering member
2616
star this property label Biography information for Lord Henley more like this
star this property tabling member
4564
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Bird more like this
1060655
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-02-13more like thismore than 2019-02-13
star this property answering body
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
star this property answering dept id 201 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
star this property hansard heading Climate Change more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent discussions he has had with his EU counterparts on the effect on climate change policy of the UK leaving the EU without a deal. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Coventry South more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Mr Jim Cunningham more like this
star this property uin 220772 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
unstar this property answer text <p>Leaving the EU with a deal remains the Government’s top priority. This has not changed. The Government has accelerated no deal preparations to ensure the country is prepared for every eventuality. The recently updated technical notices set out the UK’s firm commitment to addressing climate change, including in a no deal scenario, and provides advice on meeting climate change requirements if there is no withdrawal agreement.</p><p> </p><p>EU exit will not affect UK emissions reduction commitments, as our ambitious emissions reduction commitments are enshrined in UK law in the Climate Change Act. Continuing discussion on global challenges such as climate change is in the UK’s and EU’s mutual interest. I have been engaging on behalf of my rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State, including supporting international climate negotiations at COP24 where I had many constructive talks with EU counterparts. The importance of cooperation in the fight against climate change was recognised in the joint statement on behalf of President Junker and the Prime Minister on 7 February 2019, and we intend to continue building on this momentum in the coming months.</p><p> </p><p>My upcoming speech at a European young leaders’ event is a further example of how we are taking advantage of all opportunities to engage on this subject. We are prepared to intensify our engagement and cooperation with EU institutions and member states, and the Secretary of State stands by ready to engage counterparts.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Devizes more like this
star this property answering member printed Claire Perry more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-02-25T10:09:40.973Zmore like thismore than 2019-02-25T10:09:40.973Z
unstar this property answering member
3974
star this property label Biography information for Claire Perry more like this
star this property tabling member
308
unstar this property label Biography information for Mr Jim Cunningham more like this