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1135945
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-07-01more like thismore than 2019-07-01
star this property answering body
Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 53 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property hansard heading Political Parties: Finance remove filter
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 1 July 2017 to Question 268970, whether his Department received proposals from the Electoral Commission on the implementation of section 10 of the Political Parties and Elections Act 2009. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Hemsworth more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Jon Trickett more like this
star this property uin 271380 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-07-04more like thismore than 2019-07-04
unstar this property answer text <p>The Electoral Commission set out their concerns and recommendations for implementation in their 2013 report ‘<em>A regulatory review of the UK’s party and election finance laws: Recommendations for change</em>’.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Torbay more like this
star this property answering member printed Kevin Foster more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-07-04T09:59:54.843Zmore like thismore than 2019-07-04T09:59:54.843Z
star this property answering member
4451
star this property label Biography information for Kevin Foster more like this
star this property tabling member
410
unstar this property label Biography information for Jon Trickett more like this
1134466
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-25more like thismore than 2019-06-25
star this property answering body
Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 53 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property hansard heading Political Parties: Finance remove filter
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 24 June 2019 to Question 266672 on Political Parties: Finance, for what reason the Government considers Section 10 of the Political Parties and Elections Act 2009 to be unworkable. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Hemsworth more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Jon Trickett more like this
star this property uin 268969 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-07-01more like thismore than 2019-07-01
unstar this property answer text <p>The Coalition Government took the decision not to implement the 2009 legislation, as it was not deemed to be workable, and the Conservative Government continues to hold this view.</p><p>During the passage of the 2009 Act, the Electoral Commission raised concerns about the legislation (further to Official Report, 15 October 2009, Col. 998W), and in 2013, the Electoral Commission also flagged issues about the tax status declaration requirements. The Labour Government conceded that the provisions could not be commenced at that time “due to their complex nature” (as outlined in the answer of Official Report, 10 March 2010, Col. 5MC).</p><p> </p><p>An individual’s tax status is subject to confidentiality between them and HMRC. It may therefore be difficult or impossible for the political party and the Electoral Commission to accurately determine whether a donor meets the permissibility test set out section 10 in the Political Parties and Elections Act 2009.</p><p>The Government also has a principled objection to the measures:</p><p> </p><ul><li>The UK has a robust legal framework in place that bans foreign donations. There is a long-standing principle – as originally recommended by the Committee on Standards in Public Life in 1998 – that permissible donors are those on the UK electoral register, and this includes UK citizens who are registered overseas electors. Companies wishing to make donations must be UK-registered and carrying on business in the UK.</li></ul><p> </p><ul><li>If a British citizen is able to vote in an election for a political party, they should also be able to donate to that political party, subject to the requirements for transparency on donations. Supporting a political party is part of the democratic process, and is an expression of freedom of association.</li></ul><p> </p><ul><li>Since the adoption of universal suffrage, taxation has never been the basis of enfranchisement in the UK. Those who do not pay income tax, such as those earning less than the tax-free personal allowance, rightly remain entitled to vote. Similarly, full-time students are legally exempt from paying council tax, but still have the right to vote in local elections.</li></ul><p> </p><p>Notwithstanding, as I stated in my previous answer, the Government has announced it will consult on strengthening the current provisions which protect UK politics from foreign influence. The consultation may consider recommendations on tackling loopholes in relation to foreign spending in elections and donations from shell companies which are not properly operating in the UK.</p><p> </p><p>More broadly, since 2010, the Government has taken action to sanction and deter those involved in offshore evasion, including creating a new criminal offence for serious offshore evasion, and introducing penalties for those who deliberately help others to evade tax offshore. The Government has introduced over 100 new measures to tackle tax avoidance, evasion and non-compliance.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Torbay more like this
star this property answering member printed Kevin Foster more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-07-01T09:32:22.537Zmore like thismore than 2019-07-01T09:32:22.537Z
star this property answering member
4451
star this property label Biography information for Kevin Foster more like this
star this property tabling member
410
unstar this property label Biography information for Jon Trickett more like this
1134468
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-25more like thismore than 2019-06-25
star this property answering body
Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 53 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property hansard heading Political Parties: Finance remove filter
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department has received representations from the Electoral Commission on the workability of section 10 of the Political Parties and Elections Act 2009. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Hemsworth more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Jon Trickett more like this
star this property uin 268970 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-07-01more like thismore than 2019-07-01
unstar this property answer text <p>The Coalition Government took the decision not to implement the 2009 legislation, as it was not deemed to be workable, and the Conservative Government continues to hold this view.</p><p>During the passage of the 2009 Act, the Electoral Commission raised concerns about the legislation (further to Official Report, 15 October 2009, Col. 998W), and in 2013, the Electoral Commission also flagged issues about the tax status declaration requirements. The Labour Government conceded that the provisions could not be commenced at that time “due to their complex nature” (as outlined in the answer of Official Report, 10 March 2010, Col. 5MC).</p><p> </p><p>An individual’s tax status is subject to confidentiality between them and HMRC. It may therefore be difficult or impossible for the political party and the Electoral Commission to accurately determine whether a donor meets the permissibility test set out section 10 in the Political Parties and Elections Act 2009.</p><p>The Government also has a principled objection to the measures:</p><p> </p><ul><li>The UK has a robust legal framework in place that bans foreign donations. There is a long-standing principle – as originally recommended by the Committee on Standards in Public Life in 1998 – that permissible donors are those on the UK electoral register, and this includes UK citizens who are registered overseas electors. Companies wishing to make donations must be UK-registered and carrying on business in the UK.</li></ul><p> </p><ul><li>If a British citizen is able to vote in an election for a political party, they should also be able to donate to that political party, subject to the requirements for transparency on donations. Supporting a political party is part of the democratic process, and is an expression of freedom of association.</li></ul><p> </p><ul><li>Since the adoption of universal suffrage, taxation has never been the basis of enfranchisement in the UK. Those who do not pay income tax, such as those earning less than the tax-free personal allowance, rightly remain entitled to vote. Similarly, full-time students are legally exempt from paying council tax, but still have the right to vote in local elections.</li></ul><p> </p><p>Notwithstanding, as I stated in my previous answer, the Government has announced it will consult on strengthening the current provisions which protect UK politics from foreign influence. The consultation may consider recommendations on tackling loopholes in relation to foreign spending in elections and donations from shell companies which are not properly operating in the UK.</p><p> </p><p>More broadly, since 2010, the Government has taken action to sanction and deter those involved in offshore evasion, including creating a new criminal offence for serious offshore evasion, and introducing penalties for those who deliberately help others to evade tax offshore. The Government has introduced over 100 new measures to tackle tax avoidance, evasion and non-compliance.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Torbay more like this
star this property answering member printed Kevin Foster more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-07-01T09:32:44.983Zmore like thismore than 2019-07-01T09:32:44.983Z
star this property answering member
4451
star this property label Biography information for Kevin Foster more like this
star this property tabling member
410
unstar this property label Biography information for Jon Trickett more like this
1133264
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-19more like thismore than 2019-06-19
star this property answering body
Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 53 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property hansard heading Political Parties: Finance remove filter
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, for what reason the Government has not issued a commencement order for Section 10 of the Political Parties Act 2009, in relation to non-resident donors. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Hemsworth more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Jon Trickett more like this
star this property uin 266672 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-24more like thismore than 2019-06-24
unstar this property answer text <p>Successive Governments have considered section 10 of the Political Parties and Elections Act 2009 to be unworkable</p><p>There is already a robust legal framework in place to ensure only individuals that are registered on the electoral register and organisations that carry out business in the UK can<br>make donations to political organisations in the UK</p><p>In May this year, the Government announced it will consult on strengthening the current provisions which protect UK politics from foreign influence. The consultation may consider<br>recommendations on foreign spending in elections and donations from shell companies.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Torbay more like this
star this property answering member printed Kevin Foster more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-24T16:25:16.157Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-24T16:25:16.157Z
star this property answering member
4451
star this property label Biography information for Kevin Foster more like this
star this property tabling member
410
unstar this property label Biography information for Jon Trickett more like this
1132688
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-17more like thismore than 2019-06-17
star this property answering body
Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission more like this
star this property answering dept id 36 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission more like this
star this property hansard heading Political Parties: Finance remove filter
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the hon. Member for Houghton and Sunderland South, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, whether the Electoral Commission plans to review the ability of UK political parties and campaigns to receive micro-funding from overseas donors. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Cardiff South and Penarth more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Stephen Doughty more like this
star this property uin 911478 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-24more like thismore than 2019-06-24
unstar this property answer text <p>Electoral law allows parties to adopt a fundraising strategy that focusses on raising funds in small amounts. A positive aspect of this is broad engagement of people in politics.</p><p>Parliament set a threshold of £500, above which donations must be from permissible sources. This is to limit influence from outside the UK on our elections and democracy. Below the threshold, sums given to parties and campaigners are not considered to be donations under law, but recipients still need to satisfy themselves who is giving these sums. Multiple sums from a single source could aggregate to above £500 triggering the permissibility rules. This would exclude overseas donors not on the UK electoral register.</p><p>Parties must have systems in place to comply with the rules, and the Commission provides advice to parties and campaigners about how to ensure that they do. If the current law is complied with, there is no reason why micro funding would result in impermissible donations from overseas donors. However, if it is considered that confidence in this needs to be improved by more transparency, the level of the £500 threshold could be lowered by Parliament.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Houghton and Sunderland South more like this
star this property answering member printed Bridget Phillipson more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-24T09:58:46.777Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-24T09:58:46.777Z
star this property answering member
4046
star this property label Biography information for Bridget Phillipson more like this
star this property tabling member
4264
unstar this property label Biography information for Stephen Doughty more like this
1126732
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-14more like thismore than 2019-05-14
star this property answering body
Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 53 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property hansard heading Political Parties: Finance remove filter
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the Electoral Commission about putting in place safeguards to ensure that political parties do not receive donations from people promoting the interests of other countries during and between election campaigns. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Tonge more like this
star this property uin HL15749 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-05-16more like thismore than 2019-05-16
unstar this property answer text <p>The Electoral Commission in its 2018 report ‘Digital campaigning - Increasing transparency for voters’, included recommendations relating to foreign donations and campaigning. The Government has discussed these with the Electoral Commission.</p><p>On 5th May 2019, the Government announced it will consult on safeguarding UK elections. The consultation may consider recommendations for increasing transparency on digital political advertising, including by third parties; closing loopholes on foreign spending in elections; preventing shell companies from sidestepping the current rules on political finance and on action to tackle foreign lobbying.</p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-16T16:09:24.067Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-16T16:09:24.067Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
200
unstar this property label Biography information for Baroness Tonge more like this
1086395
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-03-11more like thismore than 2019-03-11
star this property answering body
Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 53 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property hansard heading Political Parties: Finance remove filter
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of (1) implementing section 10 of the Political Parties and Elections Act 2009, and (2) extending permanently the capacity of UK citizens living abroad to make large donations to the parties, on the financing of political parties. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Rennard more like this
star this property uin HL14422 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-03-18more like thismore than 2019-03-18
unstar this property answer text <p>The Coalition Government took the decision not to implement the 2009 legislation, as it was not deemed to be workable</p><p><br>During the passage of the 2009 Act, the Electoral Commission raised concerns about the legislation (further to Official Report, House of Commons, 15 October 2009, Col. 998W), and in 2013, the Electoral Commission also flagged issues about the tax status declaration requirements. The Labour Government conceded that the provisions could not be commenced at that time “due to their complex nature” (as outlined in the answer of Official Report, House of Commons, 10 March 2010, Col. 5MC)</p><p><br>The UK has a robust legal framework in place that bans foreign donations.</p><p><br>There is a long-standing principle – as originally recommended by the Committee on Standards in Public Life in 1998 – that permissible donors are those on the UK electoral register, and this includes UK citizens who are registered overseas electors. Companies wishing to make donations must be UK-registered and carrying on business in the UK</p><p><br>If a British citizen is able to vote in an election for a political party, they should also be able to donate to that political party, subject to the requirements for transparency on donations. Supporting a political party is part of the democratic process, and is an expression of freedom of association</p><p><br>Since the adoption of universal suffrage, taxation has never been the basis of enfranchisement in the UK. Those who do not pay income tax, such as those earning less than the tax-free personal allowance, rightly remain entitled to vote. Similarly, full-time students are legally exempt from paying council tax, but still have the right to vote in local elections</p><p><br>More broadly, since 2010, the Government has taken action to sanction and deter those involved in offshore evasion, including creating a new criminal offence for serious offshore evasion, and introducing penalties for those who deliberately help others to evade tax offshore. The Government has introduced over 100 new measures to tackle tax avoidance, evasion and non-compliance.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
HL14419 more like this
HL14423 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-03-18T12:45:10.52Zmore like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
2484
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Rennard more like this
1086396
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-03-11more like thismore than 2019-03-11
star this property answering body
Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 53 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property hansard heading Political Parties: Finance remove filter
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to restrict donations to political parties from people living in tax havens and paying lower rates of tax than donors to political parties who pay full rates of tax. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Rennard more like this
star this property uin HL14423 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-03-18more like thismore than 2019-03-18
unstar this property answer text <p>The Coalition Government took the decision not to implement the 2009 legislation, as it was not deemed to be workable</p><p><br>During the passage of the 2009 Act, the Electoral Commission raised concerns about the legislation (further to Official Report, House of Commons, 15 October 2009, Col. 998W), and in 2013, the Electoral Commission also flagged issues about the tax status declaration requirements. The Labour Government conceded that the provisions could not be commenced at that time “due to their complex nature” (as outlined in the answer of Official Report, House of Commons, 10 March 2010, Col. 5MC)</p><p><br>The UK has a robust legal framework in place that bans foreign donations.</p><p><br>There is a long-standing principle – as originally recommended by the Committee on Standards in Public Life in 1998 – that permissible donors are those on the UK electoral register, and this includes UK citizens who are registered overseas electors. Companies wishing to make donations must be UK-registered and carrying on business in the UK</p><p><br>If a British citizen is able to vote in an election for a political party, they should also be able to donate to that political party, subject to the requirements for transparency on donations. Supporting a political party is part of the democratic process, and is an expression of freedom of association</p><p><br>Since the adoption of universal suffrage, taxation has never been the basis of enfranchisement in the UK. Those who do not pay income tax, such as those earning less than the tax-free personal allowance, rightly remain entitled to vote. Similarly, full-time students are legally exempt from paying council tax, but still have the right to vote in local elections</p><p><br>More broadly, since 2010, the Government has taken action to sanction and deter those involved in offshore evasion, including creating a new criminal offence for serious offshore evasion, and introducing penalties for those who deliberately help others to evade tax offshore. The Government has introduced over 100 new measures to tackle tax avoidance, evasion and non-compliance.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
HL14419 more like this
HL14422 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-03-18T12:45:10.617Zmore like thismore than 2019-03-18T12:45:10.617Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
2484
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Rennard more like this