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746441
unstar this property registered interest false more like this
unstar this property date less than 2017-06-28more like thismore than 2017-06-28
star this property answering body
Department for Education remove filter
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
star this property hansard heading Students: Fees and Charges remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate she has made of the cost of abolishing university tuition fees. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Brentwood and Ongar remove filter
star this property tabling member printed
Alex Burghart more like this
star this property uin 1620 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-08-07more like thismore than 2017-08-07
star this property answer text <p>The Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) has estimated that abolishing tuition fees would increase the fiscal deficit for the 2017/18 student cohort by around £11bn, with the long-term cost of student funding increasing by around £6.5bn.</p><p>The major reforms to English higher education in 2012 have significantly increased average per-student funding. Graduates do not start repaying loans until their annual incomes reach £21,000, and loans are written off after 30 years.</p><p>By enabling English universities to charge current tuition fees, the Government no longer has to ration access to higher education via a cap on student numbers. This enables it to offer more places, including to young people from disadvantaged backgrounds, who are now going to university at a record rate – they are 43% morelikely to go to university 43%more likely to go to university than they were in 2009.*</p><p>Graduates earn, on average, substantially more than people with A levels who did not go to university.</p><p> </p><p>Various pieces of research show that Higher Education graduates earn, on average, at least £100,000 more over their lifetimes than those without a degree but with 2 or more A-Levels. The most recent BIS commissioned research shows that, on average, a male graduate could expect to earn £170,000 more and a female graduate £250,000 more over their lifetimes, than someone without a degree but with 2 or more A-levels, net of tax and other costs (2012 prices).</p><p>Abolishing tuition fees would be socially regressive: as well as unfairly burdening the general taxpayer, it would benefit mainly those students going on to well-paid jobs, who repay their loans in full.</p><p>*<a href="https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/ld201617/ldselect/ldsecleg/92/9207.htm" target="_blank">https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/ld201617/ldselect/ldsecleg/92/9207.htm</a></p><p> </p><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency Orpington remove filter
star this property answering member printed Joseph Johnson more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-08-07T13:03:19.033Zmore like thismore than 2017-08-07T13:03:19.033Z
star this property answering member
4039
star this property label Biography information for Joseph Johnson more like this
star this property tabling member
4613
unstar this property label Biography information for Alex Burghart more like this