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517597
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2016-05-04more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
unstar this property hansard heading National Curriculum Tests more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the long-term impact of the introduction of SAT exams on vulnerable children. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Afshar more like this
star this property uin HL8190 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2016-05-12more like thismore than 2016-05-12
star this property answer text <p>SATs, now called national curriculum tests, were first introduced in 1991. In determining primary assessment policy, the Department considers the impact of testing on all children as a matter of course, which includes drawing on evidence from this country’s past national tests.</p><p>As part of our Public Sector Equality Duty, we also consider the impact of Government policy on different groups of pupils, including – but not limited to – those with protected characteristics under the Equality Act 2010. Vulnerable children, such as those from disadvantaged backgrounds who qualify for free school meals, looked-after children who attract pupil premium plus funding, or those with special educational needs.</p><p>The Government believes that rigorous and appropriate assessment is in all pupils’ interests. National curriculum tests help teachers to understand how pupils are doing in relation to national expectations and identify where additional support is needed. They also hold schools to account for how well they support their pupils, which the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development concludes is particularly important for the least advantaged. The tests should not put undue pressure on any pupil and we trust teachers to approach them in a proportionate manner. Schools are also required to provide continuous and appropriate support for the wellbeing and resilience of all pupils.</p><p>For this year, we have introduced updated tests to align with the new National Curriculum which was introduced in 2014. In developing the curriculum we have been mindful of the possible impact on equalities and based on a wide range of evidence we have conducted a full equalities impact assessment. This paper has been attached to this answer.</p><p>The new tests will assess pupils’ attainment against the National Curriculum. In developing these tests, the Department has considered carefully their impact upon all pupils and we will continue to do so as they are introduced in schools.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Nash more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2016-05-12T11:29:53.053Zmore like thismore than 2016-05-12T11:29:53.053Z
star this property answering member
4270
star this property label Biography information for Lord Nash more like this
star this property attachment
1
star this property file name HL8190 Attachment.pdf more like this
unstar this property title Reform_of_the_national_curriculum_England more like this
star this property tabling member
3847
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Afshar more like this
524597
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2016-06-13more like thismore than 2016-06-13
star this property answering body
Foreign and Commonwealth Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 16 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Foreign and Commonwealth Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Foreign and Commonwealth Office more like this
unstar this property hansard heading European Network and Information Security Agency more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government what representations they have made to the government of Iran about the protection of the human rights of Iranian women and scholars. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Afshar more like this
star this property uin HL630 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2016-06-22more like thismore than 2016-06-22
star this property answer text <p>As mentioned in the 2015 Foreign and Commonwealth Office Annual Human Rights report, women do not enjoy the same rights and privileges as men in Iran and continue to face discrimination. There are continued restrictions on freedom of expression and belief. We repeatedly call on the Iranian government to guarantee the human rights of all Iranians and will continue to do so. The Foreign Secretary, my Rt Hon. Friend the Member for Runnymede and Weybridge (Mr Hammond), most recently raised the issue of human rights with Foreign Minister Zarif when they met on the 17 May.</p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Baroness Anelay of St Johns more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2016-06-22T13:36:24.89Zmore like thismore than 2016-06-22T13:36:24.89Z
star this property answering member
3474
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Anelay of St Johns more like this
star this property tabling member
3847
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Afshar more like this
671918
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-01-11more like thismore than 2017-01-11
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Pupils: English Language more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the answer by Lord Nash on 11 January about the risk to children in unrecognised school settings or receiving home education, what specific measures are taken to help children who come from households where English is not spoken. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Afshar more like this
star this property uin HL4587 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-01-23more like thismore than 2017-01-23
star this property answer text <p>The Government supports children from homes where English is not spoken in a number of ways. At present, it is up to local authorities to decide whether to include English as an Additional Language (EAL) as a factor in the local formulae for funding schools. 136 used an EAL factor in the current year, with per pupil values ranging from below £100 to over £3000. However, in our proposals for the National Funding Formula, currently under consultation, we have proposed that all children with EAL will attract an additional £515 (primary) or £1385 (secondary) to their school, for the first 3 years after they enter the state system, wherever they are in the country. This is proposed to come in from 2018-19.</p><p>Where children are educating at home instead of in school, parents who educate a child at home must provide a full-time education suitable to the child’s age, ability and aptitudes, and it is likely that such an education would need to include lessons in English to meet that requirement.</p><p>The Government also supports training for adults in English for Speakers of Other Language (ESOL): to enable unemployed people on benefits to get the skills they need to get into and stay in work; to support the integration of long-standing migrant communities and particularly those individuals most at risk of isolation from services and wider society; and to support refugees, especially Syrians, to resettle in the UK. DfE funds ESOL training through the Adult Education Budget, which is allocated to providers annually by the Skills Funding Agency. In 2015-16 just under £100m was devoted to ESOL provision.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Nash more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-01-23T15:34:15.143Zmore like thismore than 2017-01-23T15:34:15.143Z
star this property answering member
4270
star this property label Biography information for Lord Nash more like this
star this property tabling member
3847
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Afshar more like this
677403
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-01-23more like thismore than 2017-01-23
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Offenders: Rehabilitation more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government what requirements they have set for community rehabilitation companies to make specific arrangements for the rehabilitation of minority groups whose first language is not English. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Afshar more like this
star this property uin HL4869 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove maximum value filtermore like thismore than 2017-02-02
star this property answer text <p>We have given Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) the flexibility to innovate and do what works to reduce reoffending, including tailoring rehabilitative support to offenders based on their individual needs. To promote equality of opportunity and avoid discrimination against offenders on the grounds of protected characteristics, CRCs are required to comply with relevant equalities and human rights legislation as they work with offenders.</p><p> </p><p>Whilst not defined in law as a protected characteristic, we have taken steps to ensure that language is not a barrier to an individual’s rehabilitation. At the beginning of each sentence, CRCs are contractually required to arrange a face to face interview to assess each offender’s risk profile and rehabilitative needs. This informs the initial sentence plan, which the CRC must explain to the offender verbally and in writing to ensure they understand how they must behave and what they must do to comply with their sentence. The CRC must also seek confirmation that the offender has understood this explanation. Where the offender understands insufficient English to enable this, CRC must undertake the initial interview and provide confirmation of the sentence plan in a language they were able to understand.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Keen of Elie more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-02-02T16:39:32.403Zmore like thismore than 2017-02-02T16:39:32.403Z
star this property answering member
4538
star this property label Biography information for Lord Keen of Elie more like this
star this property tabling member
3847
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Afshar more like this
576218
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2016-09-05more like thismore than 2016-09-05
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
unstar this property hansard heading State Retirement Pensions: Females more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government what estimate they have made of the number of women who are in hardship as a result of the decision to change women’s state pension age. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Altmann more like this
star this property uin HL1458 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2016-09-12more like thismore than 2016-09-12
star this property answer text <p>The welfare system provides a safety net for those of working age and there are a range of benefits tailored to individual circumstances. The system is designed to deal with the problems which affect those most in need and takes into account difficulty in finding work, disability and caring responsibilities. No figures are available as to why claimants apply for help to the benefits system.</p><p> </p><p>Independent analysis by the Institute for Fiscal Studies has shown that the rise in women’s State Pension age since 2010 has been accompanied by increases in employment rates for the women affected.</p><p> </p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Freud more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2016-09-12T16:43:26.423Zmore like thismore than 2016-09-12T16:43:26.423Z
star this property answering member
3893
star this property label Biography information for Lord Freud more like this
star this property tabling member
4533
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Altmann more like this
576219
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2016-09-05more like thismore than 2016-09-05
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
unstar this property hansard heading State Retirement Pensions: Females more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many women born in the 1950s received Automated Pension Forecasts in the years 2003 to 2006, and of those, how many were also sent the official PM6 leaflet <i>Pensions for Women – Your Guide</i>. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Altmann more like this
star this property uin HL1459 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2016-09-09more like thismore than 2016-09-09
star this property answer text <p>The information requested is not available</p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Freud more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2016-09-09T11:46:46.327Zmore like thismore than 2016-09-09T11:46:46.327Z
star this property answering member
3893
star this property label Biography information for Lord Freud more like this
star this property tabling member
4533
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Altmann more like this
576220
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2016-09-05more like thismore than 2016-09-05
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
unstar this property hansard heading State Retirement Pensions: Males more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government what estimate they have made of the number of men now aged between 58 and 62 inclusive who are aware that they will not receive their state pension when they reach their 65th birthday. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Altmann more like this
star this property uin HL1460 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2016-09-15more like thismore than 2016-09-15
star this property answer text <p>No estimate is held on the number of men that are currently aware of the increases to State Pension age. However, all men affected by the State Pension age increase in the Pensions Act 2011 were written to between January 2012 and November 2013 using the addresses held by HMRC at the time.</p><p> </p><p>The Department does not hold a specific estimate on the number of women that are aware of their state pension age. We wrote to all women affected by the Pensions Act 2011 in the age range specified between January 2012 and November 2013 using the addresses held by HMRC at the time.</p><p> </p><p>In 2004, a DWP survey found that 73 per cent of people aged 45 to 54 (so aged 57 to 66 in 2016) were aware of the future increase in Women’s State Pension age. In 2006, 86 per cent of women aged 55-64 (so aged 65 to 74 in 2016) and 90 per cent aged 45-54 (so aged 55 to 64 in 2016) were aware that the State Pension age will increase in future. In 2012, a similar survey found that only 6% of respondents thought their State Pension Age was 60.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Freud more like this
star this property grouped question UIN HL1461 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2016-09-15T11:39:58.403Zmore like thismore than 2016-09-15T11:39:58.403Z
star this property answering member
3893
star this property label Biography information for Lord Freud more like this
star this property tabling member
4533
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Altmann more like this
576221
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2016-09-05more like thismore than 2016-09-05
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
unstar this property hansard heading State Retirement Pensions: Females more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government what estimates they have made of the number of women now aged between 58 and 62 inclusive who are aware of their correct state pension age. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Altmann more like this
star this property uin HL1461 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2016-09-15more like thismore than 2016-09-15
star this property answer text <p>No estimate is held on the number of men that are currently aware of the increases to State Pension age. However, all men affected by the State Pension age increase in the Pensions Act 2011 were written to between January 2012 and November 2013 using the addresses held by HMRC at the time.</p><p> </p><p>The Department does not hold a specific estimate on the number of women that are aware of their state pension age. We wrote to all women affected by the Pensions Act 2011 in the age range specified between January 2012 and November 2013 using the addresses held by HMRC at the time.</p><p> </p><p>In 2004, a DWP survey found that 73 per cent of people aged 45 to 54 (so aged 57 to 66 in 2016) were aware of the future increase in Women’s State Pension age. In 2006, 86 per cent of women aged 55-64 (so aged 65 to 74 in 2016) and 90 per cent aged 45-54 (so aged 55 to 64 in 2016) were aware that the State Pension age will increase in future. In 2012, a similar survey found that only 6% of respondents thought their State Pension Age was 60.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Freud more like this
star this property grouped question UIN HL1460 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2016-09-15T11:39:58.467Zmore like thismore than 2016-09-15T11:39:58.467Z
star this property answering member
3893
star this property label Biography information for Lord Freud more like this
star this property tabling member
4533
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Altmann more like this
576222
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2016-09-05more like thismore than 2016-09-05
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
unstar this property hansard heading State Retirement Pensions more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many letters they have written to (1) women, and (2) men, to inform them of changes to their state pension age; of those letters sent out, how many were returned undelivered; and when letters were returned undelivered, what efforts they then made to contact those individuals. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Altmann more like this
star this property uin HL1462 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2016-09-15more like thismore than 2016-09-15
star this property answer text <p>Between April 2009 and March 2011, the Department mailed all women born between 6th April 1950 and 5th April 1953, informing them of their State Pension age under the 1995 Pensions Act. This involved sending 1.16 million letters to the affected females.</p><p> </p><p>Following the 2011 changes DWP wrote to all individuals directly affected to inform them of the change to their State Pension age. This applied to women born between 6th April 1953 and the 5th of April 1960 and men born between 6<sup>th</sup> December 1953 and 5<sup>th</sup> April 1960. These letters were sent between January 2012 and November 2013. This involved sending 5.77 million letters to the affected males and females.</p><p> </p><p>We do not have the total number of letters returned undelivered over the course of all the exercises. However, I can confirm we have a robust process in place to review all incorrect address returns and properly scrutinise and update customer account details when an address is confirmed. For State Pension customers, this process includes re-establishing contact through Local Authority Social Services or a DWP Visiting Officer.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Freud more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2016-09-15T11:26:51.747Zmore like thismore than 2016-09-15T11:26:51.747Z
star this property answering member
3893
star this property label Biography information for Lord Freud more like this
star this property tabling member
4533
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Altmann more like this
576223
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2016-09-05more like thismore than 2016-09-05
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
unstar this property hansard heading State Retirement Pensions: Females more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government what estimates they have made of the number of women who were unaware in (1) 2011, (2) 2012 and (3) 2013, that the Pensions Act 1995 had changed their state pension age from 60. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Altmann more like this
star this property uin HL1463 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2016-09-15more like thismore than 2016-09-15
star this property answer text <p>The Department does not hold a specific estimate on the number of women that are unaware of their state pension age. We wrote to all women affected by the Pensions Act 1995 between April 2009 and March 2011 using the addresses held by HMRC at the time.</p><p> </p><p>In 2004, a DWP survey found that 73 per cent of people aged 45 to 54 (so aged 57 to 66 in 2016) were aware of the future increase in Women’s State Pension age. In 2006, 86 per cent of women aged 55-64 (so aged 65 to 74 in 2016) and 90 per cent aged 45-54 (so aged 55 to 64 in 2016) were aware that the State Pension age will increase in future. In 2012, a similar survey found that only 6% of respondents thought their State Pension Age was 60.</p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Freud more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2016-09-15T11:41:19.637Zmore like thismore than 2016-09-15T11:41:19.637Z
star this property answering member
3893
star this property label Biography information for Lord Freud more like this
star this property tabling member
4533
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Altmann more like this