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386925
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-07-01more like thismore than 2015-07-01
star this property answering body
Department of Health more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Health more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health more like this
star this property hansard heading Vitamin B12 more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government what steps they are taking to ensure that a reliable test to assess the vitamin B12 status of the United Kingdom population is made available as a means to prevent serious and irreversible neurological damage before any mandatory fortification of flour with folic acid is introduced. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
The Countess of Mar more like this
star this property uin HL1034 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-07-14more like thisremove minimum value filter
unstar this property answer text <p>The diagnosis and treatment of pernicious anaemia, the result of a vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency, is well established and reported in the British Committee for Standards in Haematology (BCSH) guidance document, <em>Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of Cobalamin and Folate disorders</em>, which was updated in May 2014. A copy of the BCSH guidance document is attached.</p><p> </p><p>The BCSH operates independently of the Department and NHS England and produces evidence based guidelines for both clinical and laboratory haematologists on the diagnosis and treatment of haematological disease, drawing on the advice of expert consultants and clinical scientists practicing in the United Kingdom. It would be for the BCSH, not the Department, to consider whether any adjustments to current best practice, in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with pernicious anaemia were needed, including whether any new or additional tests were appropriate.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The BCSH guidance sets out that cobalamin status is the recommended first line diagnostic test. The Department has no data relating to false positive results in relation to the test. The guidance also states that clinical picture is the most important factor in assessing the significance of the test results.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>When anaemia is diagnosed, most patients respond well to treatment through quarterly intramuscular injection of vitamin B12. Whilst some patients with pernicious anaemia might prefer to have more frequent injections, or for other forms of vitamin B12 to be self-administered, these are matters for individual patients to discuss with their general practitioners.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Although the Medicines Healthcare products Regulatory Agency is currently reviewing claims made by some clinics that are administering vitamins and minerals intravenously for nutritional therapy purposes, the agency has not encountered any clinics making claims to treat pernicious anaemia. In addition, the Department does not have any information regarding patients purchasing additional supplies of B12 from unregulated sources.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Regarding the mandatory fortification of flour with folic acid, the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition recommended a number of measures to ensure monitoring and surveillance of the impact of fortification of flour, should it be implemented. This included appropriate systems to monitor any potential adverse effects, including cancer and a review of the evidence on benefits and postulated risks after five years. The National Diet and Nutrition Survey monitors folate intakes and the most recent data, which was published earlier this year, will be carefully considered alongside other information sources before any decision is made on mandatory fortification.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The Department has made no assessment of the social and economic costs of misdiagnosis or late diagnosis of pernicious anaemia and other vitamin B12 deficiencies.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Prior of Brampton more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
HL1032 more like this
HL1033 more like this
HL1035 more like this
HL1036 more like this
HL1042 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-07-14T15:00:41.947Zmore like thismore than 2015-07-14T15:00:41.947Z
star this property answering member
127
star this property label Biography information for Lord Prior of Brampton more like this
star this property attachment
1
star this property file name colbalamin and folate disorders.pdf more like this
star this property title BSCH Guidance more like this
star this property tabling member
1861
unstar this property label Biography information for The Countess of Mar more like this
386926
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-07-01more like thismore than 2015-07-01
star this property answering body
Department of Health more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Health more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health more like this
star this property hansard heading Vitamin B12 more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the frequency at which patients with pernicious anaemia require vitamin B12 replacement therapy by injection; whether they have any evidence that patients are purchasing additional supplies from unregulated sources; and whether they will review current guidance. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
The Countess of Mar more like this
star this property uin HL1035 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-07-14more like thisremove minimum value filter
unstar this property answer text <p>The diagnosis and treatment of pernicious anaemia, the result of a vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency, is well established and reported in the British Committee for Standards in Haematology (BCSH) guidance document, <em>Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of Cobalamin and Folate disorders</em>, which was updated in May 2014. A copy of the BCSH guidance document is attached.</p><p> </p><p>The BCSH operates independently of the Department and NHS England and produces evidence based guidelines for both clinical and laboratory haematologists on the diagnosis and treatment of haematological disease, drawing on the advice of expert consultants and clinical scientists practicing in the United Kingdom. It would be for the BCSH, not the Department, to consider whether any adjustments to current best practice, in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with pernicious anaemia were needed, including whether any new or additional tests were appropriate.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The BCSH guidance sets out that cobalamin status is the recommended first line diagnostic test. The Department has no data relating to false positive results in relation to the test. The guidance also states that clinical picture is the most important factor in assessing the significance of the test results.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>When anaemia is diagnosed, most patients respond well to treatment through quarterly intramuscular injection of vitamin B12. Whilst some patients with pernicious anaemia might prefer to have more frequent injections, or for other forms of vitamin B12 to be self-administered, these are matters for individual patients to discuss with their general practitioners.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Although the Medicines Healthcare products Regulatory Agency is currently reviewing claims made by some clinics that are administering vitamins and minerals intravenously for nutritional therapy purposes, the agency has not encountered any clinics making claims to treat pernicious anaemia. In addition, the Department does not have any information regarding patients purchasing additional supplies of B12 from unregulated sources.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Regarding the mandatory fortification of flour with folic acid, the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition recommended a number of measures to ensure monitoring and surveillance of the impact of fortification of flour, should it be implemented. This included appropriate systems to monitor any potential adverse effects, including cancer and a review of the evidence on benefits and postulated risks after five years. The National Diet and Nutrition Survey monitors folate intakes and the most recent data, which was published earlier this year, will be carefully considered alongside other information sources before any decision is made on mandatory fortification.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The Department has made no assessment of the social and economic costs of misdiagnosis or late diagnosis of pernicious anaemia and other vitamin B12 deficiencies.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Prior of Brampton more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
HL1032 more like this
HL1033 more like this
HL1034 more like this
HL1036 more like this
HL1042 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-07-14T15:00:42.073Zmore like thismore than 2015-07-14T15:00:42.073Z
star this property answering member
127
star this property label Biography information for Lord Prior of Brampton more like this
star this property attachment
1
star this property file name colbalamin and folate disorders.pdf more like this
star this property title BSCH Guidance more like this
star this property tabling member
1861
unstar this property label Biography information for The Countess of Mar more like this
386927
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-07-01more like thismore than 2015-07-01
star this property answering body
Department of Health more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Health more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health more like this
star this property hansard heading Vitamin B12 more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they have assessed the social and economic costs of misdiagnosis or late diagnosis of pernicious anaemia and other vitamin B12 deficiencies; and, if so, what they consider them to be. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
The Countess of Mar more like this
star this property uin HL1036 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-07-14more like thisremove minimum value filter
unstar this property answer text <p>The diagnosis and treatment of pernicious anaemia, the result of a vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency, is well established and reported in the British Committee for Standards in Haematology (BCSH) guidance document, <em>Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of Cobalamin and Folate disorders</em>, which was updated in May 2014. A copy of the BCSH guidance document is attached.</p><p> </p><p>The BCSH operates independently of the Department and NHS England and produces evidence based guidelines for both clinical and laboratory haematologists on the diagnosis and treatment of haematological disease, drawing on the advice of expert consultants and clinical scientists practicing in the United Kingdom. It would be for the BCSH, not the Department, to consider whether any adjustments to current best practice, in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with pernicious anaemia were needed, including whether any new or additional tests were appropriate.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The BCSH guidance sets out that cobalamin status is the recommended first line diagnostic test. The Department has no data relating to false positive results in relation to the test. The guidance also states that clinical picture is the most important factor in assessing the significance of the test results.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>When anaemia is diagnosed, most patients respond well to treatment through quarterly intramuscular injection of vitamin B12. Whilst some patients with pernicious anaemia might prefer to have more frequent injections, or for other forms of vitamin B12 to be self-administered, these are matters for individual patients to discuss with their general practitioners.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Although the Medicines Healthcare products Regulatory Agency is currently reviewing claims made by some clinics that are administering vitamins and minerals intravenously for nutritional therapy purposes, the agency has not encountered any clinics making claims to treat pernicious anaemia. In addition, the Department does not have any information regarding patients purchasing additional supplies of B12 from unregulated sources.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Regarding the mandatory fortification of flour with folic acid, the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition recommended a number of measures to ensure monitoring and surveillance of the impact of fortification of flour, should it be implemented. This included appropriate systems to monitor any potential adverse effects, including cancer and a review of the evidence on benefits and postulated risks after five years. The National Diet and Nutrition Survey monitors folate intakes and the most recent data, which was published earlier this year, will be carefully considered alongside other information sources before any decision is made on mandatory fortification.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The Department has made no assessment of the social and economic costs of misdiagnosis or late diagnosis of pernicious anaemia and other vitamin B12 deficiencies.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Prior of Brampton more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
HL1032 more like this
HL1033 more like this
HL1034 more like this
HL1035 more like this
HL1042 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-07-14T15:00:42.183Zmore like thismore than 2015-07-14T15:00:42.183Z
star this property answering member
127
star this property label Biography information for Lord Prior of Brampton more like this
star this property attachment
1
star this property file name colbalamin and folate disorders.pdf more like this
star this property title BSCH Guidance more like this
star this property tabling member
1861
unstar this property label Biography information for The Countess of Mar more like this
387206
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-07-02more like thismore than 2015-07-02
star this property answering body
Department of Health more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Health more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health more like this
star this property hansard heading Vitamin B12 more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they plan to replace the current test for human vitamin B12 status with the Active B12 (holotranscobalamin) test; and if not, why not. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
The Countess of Mar more like this
star this property uin HL1042 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-07-14more like thisremove minimum value filter
unstar this property answer text <p>The diagnosis and treatment of pernicious anaemia, the result of a vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency, is well established and reported in the British Committee for Standards in Haematology (BCSH) guidance document, <em>Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of Cobalamin and Folate disorders</em>, which was updated in May 2014. A copy of the BCSH guidance document is attached.</p><p> </p><p>The BCSH operates independently of the Department and NHS England and produces evidence based guidelines for both clinical and laboratory haematologists on the diagnosis and treatment of haematological disease, drawing on the advice of expert consultants and clinical scientists practicing in the United Kingdom. It would be for the BCSH, not the Department, to consider whether any adjustments to current best practice, in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with pernicious anaemia were needed, including whether any new or additional tests were appropriate.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The BCSH guidance sets out that cobalamin status is the recommended first line diagnostic test. The Department has no data relating to false positive results in relation to the test. The guidance also states that clinical picture is the most important factor in assessing the significance of the test results.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>When anaemia is diagnosed, most patients respond well to treatment through quarterly intramuscular injection of vitamin B12. Whilst some patients with pernicious anaemia might prefer to have more frequent injections, or for other forms of vitamin B12 to be self-administered, these are matters for individual patients to discuss with their general practitioners.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Although the Medicines Healthcare products Regulatory Agency is currently reviewing claims made by some clinics that are administering vitamins and minerals intravenously for nutritional therapy purposes, the agency has not encountered any clinics making claims to treat pernicious anaemia. In addition, the Department does not have any information regarding patients purchasing additional supplies of B12 from unregulated sources.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Regarding the mandatory fortification of flour with folic acid, the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition recommended a number of measures to ensure monitoring and surveillance of the impact of fortification of flour, should it be implemented. This included appropriate systems to monitor any potential adverse effects, including cancer and a review of the evidence on benefits and postulated risks after five years. The National Diet and Nutrition Survey monitors folate intakes and the most recent data, which was published earlier this year, will be carefully considered alongside other information sources before any decision is made on mandatory fortification.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The Department has made no assessment of the social and economic costs of misdiagnosis or late diagnosis of pernicious anaemia and other vitamin B12 deficiencies.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Prior of Brampton more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
HL1032 more like this
HL1033 more like this
HL1034 more like this
HL1035 more like this
HL1036 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-07-14T15:00:42.3Zmore like thismore than 2015-07-14T15:00:42.3Z
star this property answering member
127
star this property label Biography information for Lord Prior of Brampton more like this
star this property attachment
1
star this property file name colbalamin and folate disorders.pdf more like this
star this property title BSCH Guidance more like this
star this property tabling member
1861
unstar this property label Biography information for The Countess of Mar more like this
386891
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-07-01more like thismore than 2015-07-01
star this property answering body
Department of Health more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Health more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health more like this
star this property hansard heading Neural Tube Defects more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is the latest information they have regarding high risk groups suffering neural tube defects at birth. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Rooker more like this
star this property uin HL1000 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-07-14more like thisremove minimum value filter
unstar this property answer text <p>Information on high risk groups suffering neural tube defects at birth is not collected centrally.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>There are no current mechanisms in place for monitoring the take-up of advice given on the NHS Choices website about preventing spina bifida.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The British Isles Network of Congenital Anomaly Registers (BINOCAR) collects information about the mother and child, including postcode of residence, mother’s age, pregnancy length, pregnancy outcome, when and how the anomaly was identified and the details of each anomaly.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Information on congenital abnormalities including spina bifida, hydrocephalus and anencephaly is collected by the British Isles Network of Congenital Anomaly Registers. Data is currently available for 2009–2012.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The following table shows the number of live births for years 2009-2012</p><p> </p><p><strong> </strong></p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td colspan="5"><p>Number of cases, birth prevalence (per 10,000 total births) and 95% CIs according to congenital anomaly subgroup; six BINOCAR registers (coverage: 36% of births in England and Wales): 2009-2012 – Live Births</p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p>2009</p></td><td><p>2010</p></td><td><p>2011</p></td><td><p>2012</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Congenital anomaly</p><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Spina bifida</p><p> </p></td><td><p>31</p></td><td><p>53</p></td><td><p>34</p></td><td><p>44</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Hydrocephalus</p><p> </p></td><td><p>48</p></td><td><p>85</p></td><td><p>72</p></td><td><p>84</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Anencephalus and similar</p><p> </p></td><td><p>4</p></td><td><p>4</p></td><td><p>1</p></td><td><p>6</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p><strong> </strong></p><p> </p><p>In line with National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines, health professionals use appropriate opportunities to advise all women who may become pregnant that they can most easily reduce the risk of having a baby with a neural tube defect by taking folic acid supplements. This information is also available on the NHS Choices website.</p><p> </p><p><strong> </strong></p><p> </p><p>The Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN) was, however, commissioned to provide advice to government on the impact of folic acid fortification to improve the folate status of women and therefore reduce the number of pregnancies affected by neural tube defects. This built on previous advice from SACN’s predecessor the Committee on Medical Aspects of Food and Nutrition Policy in 2000. The Government is currently considering the recommendations that SACN made alongside other information sources, including the latest folate status data and expects to make an announcement on this in due course.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Prior of Brampton more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
HL1001 more like this
HL1002 more like this
HL1003 more like this
HL1004 more like this
HL1005 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-07-14T14:37:07.203Zmore like thismore than 2015-07-14T14:37:07.203Z
star this property answering member
127
star this property label Biography information for Lord Prior of Brampton more like this
star this property tabling member
302
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Rooker more like this
386892
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-07-01more like thismore than 2015-07-01
star this property answering body
Department of Health more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Health more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health more like this
star this property hansard heading Spina Bifida: Health Education more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government how the take-up of advice given on National Health Service websites about preventing spina bifida is currently monitored. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Rooker more like this
star this property uin HL1001 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-07-14more like thisremove minimum value filter
unstar this property answer text <p>Information on high risk groups suffering neural tube defects at birth is not collected centrally.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>There are no current mechanisms in place for monitoring the take-up of advice given on the NHS Choices website about preventing spina bifida.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The British Isles Network of Congenital Anomaly Registers (BINOCAR) collects information about the mother and child, including postcode of residence, mother’s age, pregnancy length, pregnancy outcome, when and how the anomaly was identified and the details of each anomaly.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Information on congenital abnormalities including spina bifida, hydrocephalus and anencephaly is collected by the British Isles Network of Congenital Anomaly Registers. Data is currently available for 2009–2012.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The following table shows the number of live births for years 2009-2012</p><p> </p><p><strong> </strong></p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td colspan="5"><p>Number of cases, birth prevalence (per 10,000 total births) and 95% CIs according to congenital anomaly subgroup; six BINOCAR registers (coverage: 36% of births in England and Wales): 2009-2012 – Live Births</p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p>2009</p></td><td><p>2010</p></td><td><p>2011</p></td><td><p>2012</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Congenital anomaly</p><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Spina bifida</p><p> </p></td><td><p>31</p></td><td><p>53</p></td><td><p>34</p></td><td><p>44</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Hydrocephalus</p><p> </p></td><td><p>48</p></td><td><p>85</p></td><td><p>72</p></td><td><p>84</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Anencephalus and similar</p><p> </p></td><td><p>4</p></td><td><p>4</p></td><td><p>1</p></td><td><p>6</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p><strong> </strong></p><p> </p><p>In line with National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines, health professionals use appropriate opportunities to advise all women who may become pregnant that they can most easily reduce the risk of having a baby with a neural tube defect by taking folic acid supplements. This information is also available on the NHS Choices website.</p><p> </p><p><strong> </strong></p><p> </p><p>The Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN) was, however, commissioned to provide advice to government on the impact of folic acid fortification to improve the folate status of women and therefore reduce the number of pregnancies affected by neural tube defects. This built on previous advice from SACN’s predecessor the Committee on Medical Aspects of Food and Nutrition Policy in 2000. The Government is currently considering the recommendations that SACN made alongside other information sources, including the latest folate status data and expects to make an announcement on this in due course.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Prior of Brampton more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
HL1000 more like this
HL1002 more like this
HL1003 more like this
HL1004 more like this
HL1005 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-07-14T14:37:07.313Zmore like thismore than 2015-07-14T14:37:07.313Z
star this property answering member
127
star this property label Biography information for Lord Prior of Brampton more like this
star this property tabling member
302
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Rooker more like this
386893
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-07-01more like thismore than 2015-07-01
star this property answering body
Department of Health more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Health more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health more like this
star this property hansard heading Neural Tube Defects more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many live births where the child was diagnosed with spina bifida, hydrocephalus or anencephaly there have been in each of the past five years. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Rooker more like this
star this property uin HL1002 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-07-14more like thisremove minimum value filter
unstar this property answer text <p>Information on high risk groups suffering neural tube defects at birth is not collected centrally.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>There are no current mechanisms in place for monitoring the take-up of advice given on the NHS Choices website about preventing spina bifida.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The British Isles Network of Congenital Anomaly Registers (BINOCAR) collects information about the mother and child, including postcode of residence, mother’s age, pregnancy length, pregnancy outcome, when and how the anomaly was identified and the details of each anomaly.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Information on congenital abnormalities including spina bifida, hydrocephalus and anencephaly is collected by the British Isles Network of Congenital Anomaly Registers. Data is currently available for 2009–2012.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The following table shows the number of live births for years 2009-2012</p><p> </p><p><strong> </strong></p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td colspan="5"><p>Number of cases, birth prevalence (per 10,000 total births) and 95% CIs according to congenital anomaly subgroup; six BINOCAR registers (coverage: 36% of births in England and Wales): 2009-2012 – Live Births</p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p>2009</p></td><td><p>2010</p></td><td><p>2011</p></td><td><p>2012</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Congenital anomaly</p><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Spina bifida</p><p> </p></td><td><p>31</p></td><td><p>53</p></td><td><p>34</p></td><td><p>44</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Hydrocephalus</p><p> </p></td><td><p>48</p></td><td><p>85</p></td><td><p>72</p></td><td><p>84</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Anencephalus and similar</p><p> </p></td><td><p>4</p></td><td><p>4</p></td><td><p>1</p></td><td><p>6</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p><strong> </strong></p><p> </p><p>In line with National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines, health professionals use appropriate opportunities to advise all women who may become pregnant that they can most easily reduce the risk of having a baby with a neural tube defect by taking folic acid supplements. This information is also available on the NHS Choices website.</p><p> </p><p><strong> </strong></p><p> </p><p>The Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN) was, however, commissioned to provide advice to government on the impact of folic acid fortification to improve the folate status of women and therefore reduce the number of pregnancies affected by neural tube defects. This built on previous advice from SACN’s predecessor the Committee on Medical Aspects of Food and Nutrition Policy in 2000. The Government is currently considering the recommendations that SACN made alongside other information sources, including the latest folate status data and expects to make an announcement on this in due course.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Prior of Brampton more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
HL1000 more like this
HL1001 more like this
HL1003 more like this
HL1004 more like this
HL1005 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-07-14T14:37:07.437Zmore like thismore than 2015-07-14T14:37:07.437Z
star this property answering member
127
star this property label Biography information for Lord Prior of Brampton more like this
star this property tabling member
302
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Rooker more like this
386894
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-07-01more like thismore than 2015-07-01
star this property answering body
Department of Health more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Health more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health more like this
star this property hansard heading Congenital Abnormalities more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether the postcodes of mothers of babies born with congenital abnormalities are yet available on the British Isles Network of Congenital Anomaly Registers. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Rooker more like this
star this property uin HL1003 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-07-14more like thisremove minimum value filter
unstar this property answer text <p>Information on high risk groups suffering neural tube defects at birth is not collected centrally.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>There are no current mechanisms in place for monitoring the take-up of advice given on the NHS Choices website about preventing spina bifida.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The British Isles Network of Congenital Anomaly Registers (BINOCAR) collects information about the mother and child, including postcode of residence, mother’s age, pregnancy length, pregnancy outcome, when and how the anomaly was identified and the details of each anomaly.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Information on congenital abnormalities including spina bifida, hydrocephalus and anencephaly is collected by the British Isles Network of Congenital Anomaly Registers. Data is currently available for 2009–2012.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The following table shows the number of live births for years 2009-2012</p><p> </p><p><strong> </strong></p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td colspan="5"><p>Number of cases, birth prevalence (per 10,000 total births) and 95% CIs according to congenital anomaly subgroup; six BINOCAR registers (coverage: 36% of births in England and Wales): 2009-2012 – Live Births</p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p>2009</p></td><td><p>2010</p></td><td><p>2011</p></td><td><p>2012</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Congenital anomaly</p><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Spina bifida</p><p> </p></td><td><p>31</p></td><td><p>53</p></td><td><p>34</p></td><td><p>44</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Hydrocephalus</p><p> </p></td><td><p>48</p></td><td><p>85</p></td><td><p>72</p></td><td><p>84</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Anencephalus and similar</p><p> </p></td><td><p>4</p></td><td><p>4</p></td><td><p>1</p></td><td><p>6</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p><strong> </strong></p><p> </p><p>In line with National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines, health professionals use appropriate opportunities to advise all women who may become pregnant that they can most easily reduce the risk of having a baby with a neural tube defect by taking folic acid supplements. This information is also available on the NHS Choices website.</p><p> </p><p><strong> </strong></p><p> </p><p>The Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN) was, however, commissioned to provide advice to government on the impact of folic acid fortification to improve the folate status of women and therefore reduce the number of pregnancies affected by neural tube defects. This built on previous advice from SACN’s predecessor the Committee on Medical Aspects of Food and Nutrition Policy in 2000. The Government is currently considering the recommendations that SACN made alongside other information sources, including the latest folate status data and expects to make an announcement on this in due course.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Prior of Brampton more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
HL1000 more like this
HL1001 more like this
HL1002 more like this
HL1004 more like this
HL1005 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-07-14T14:37:07.86Zmore like thismore than 2015-07-14T14:37:07.86Z
star this property answering member
127
star this property label Biography information for Lord Prior of Brampton more like this
star this property tabling member
302
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Rooker more like this
386895
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-07-01more like thismore than 2015-07-01
star this property answering body
Department of Health more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Health more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health more like this
star this property hansard heading Neural Tube Defects more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the implications for health equality of their current policy regarding the prevention of neural tube defect-affected pregnancies. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Rooker more like this
star this property uin HL1004 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-07-14more like thisremove minimum value filter
unstar this property answer text <p>Information on high risk groups suffering neural tube defects at birth is not collected centrally.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>There are no current mechanisms in place for monitoring the take-up of advice given on the NHS Choices website about preventing spina bifida.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The British Isles Network of Congenital Anomaly Registers (BINOCAR) collects information about the mother and child, including postcode of residence, mother’s age, pregnancy length, pregnancy outcome, when and how the anomaly was identified and the details of each anomaly.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Information on congenital abnormalities including spina bifida, hydrocephalus and anencephaly is collected by the British Isles Network of Congenital Anomaly Registers. Data is currently available for 2009–2012.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The following table shows the number of live births for years 2009-2012</p><p> </p><p><strong> </strong></p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td colspan="5"><p>Number of cases, birth prevalence (per 10,000 total births) and 95% CIs according to congenital anomaly subgroup; six BINOCAR registers (coverage: 36% of births in England and Wales): 2009-2012 – Live Births</p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p>2009</p></td><td><p>2010</p></td><td><p>2011</p></td><td><p>2012</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Congenital anomaly</p><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Spina bifida</p><p> </p></td><td><p>31</p></td><td><p>53</p></td><td><p>34</p></td><td><p>44</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Hydrocephalus</p><p> </p></td><td><p>48</p></td><td><p>85</p></td><td><p>72</p></td><td><p>84</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Anencephalus and similar</p><p> </p></td><td><p>4</p></td><td><p>4</p></td><td><p>1</p></td><td><p>6</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p><strong> </strong></p><p> </p><p>In line with National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines, health professionals use appropriate opportunities to advise all women who may become pregnant that they can most easily reduce the risk of having a baby with a neural tube defect by taking folic acid supplements. This information is also available on the NHS Choices website.</p><p> </p><p><strong> </strong></p><p> </p><p>The Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN) was, however, commissioned to provide advice to government on the impact of folic acid fortification to improve the folate status of women and therefore reduce the number of pregnancies affected by neural tube defects. This built on previous advice from SACN’s predecessor the Committee on Medical Aspects of Food and Nutrition Policy in 2000. The Government is currently considering the recommendations that SACN made alongside other information sources, including the latest folate status data and expects to make an announcement on this in due course.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Prior of Brampton more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
HL1000 more like this
HL1001 more like this
HL1002 more like this
HL1003 more like this
HL1005 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-07-14T14:37:07.987Zmore like thismore than 2015-07-14T14:37:07.987Z
star this property answering member
127
star this property label Biography information for Lord Prior of Brampton more like this
star this property tabling member
302
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Rooker more like this
386896
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-07-01more like thismore than 2015-07-01
star this property answering body
Department of Health more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Health more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health more like this
star this property hansard heading Neural Tube Defects more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether any independent scientific advisory committee has been commissioned to study the causes and consequences of neural tube defect-affected pregnancies. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Rooker more like this
star this property uin HL1005 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-07-14more like thisremove minimum value filter
unstar this property answer text <p>Information on high risk groups suffering neural tube defects at birth is not collected centrally.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>There are no current mechanisms in place for monitoring the take-up of advice given on the NHS Choices website about preventing spina bifida.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The British Isles Network of Congenital Anomaly Registers (BINOCAR) collects information about the mother and child, including postcode of residence, mother’s age, pregnancy length, pregnancy outcome, when and how the anomaly was identified and the details of each anomaly.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Information on congenital abnormalities including spina bifida, hydrocephalus and anencephaly is collected by the British Isles Network of Congenital Anomaly Registers. Data is currently available for 2009–2012.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The following table shows the number of live births for years 2009-2012</p><p> </p><p><strong> </strong></p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td colspan="5"><p>Number of cases, birth prevalence (per 10,000 total births) and 95% CIs according to congenital anomaly subgroup; six BINOCAR registers (coverage: 36% of births in England and Wales): 2009-2012 – Live Births</p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p>2009</p></td><td><p>2010</p></td><td><p>2011</p></td><td><p>2012</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Congenital anomaly</p><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Spina bifida</p><p> </p></td><td><p>31</p></td><td><p>53</p></td><td><p>34</p></td><td><p>44</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Hydrocephalus</p><p> </p></td><td><p>48</p></td><td><p>85</p></td><td><p>72</p></td><td><p>84</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Anencephalus and similar</p><p> </p></td><td><p>4</p></td><td><p>4</p></td><td><p>1</p></td><td><p>6</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p><strong> </strong></p><p> </p><p>In line with National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines, health professionals use appropriate opportunities to advise all women who may become pregnant that they can most easily reduce the risk of having a baby with a neural tube defect by taking folic acid supplements. This information is also available on the NHS Choices website.</p><p> </p><p><strong> </strong></p><p> </p><p>The Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN) was, however, commissioned to provide advice to government on the impact of folic acid fortification to improve the folate status of women and therefore reduce the number of pregnancies affected by neural tube defects. This built on previous advice from SACN’s predecessor the Committee on Medical Aspects of Food and Nutrition Policy in 2000. The Government is currently considering the recommendations that SACN made alongside other information sources, including the latest folate status data and expects to make an announcement on this in due course.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Prior of Brampton more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
HL1000 more like this
HL1001 more like this
HL1002 more like this
HL1003 more like this
HL1004 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-07-14T14:37:08.1Zmore like thismore than 2015-07-14T14:37:08.1Z
star this property answering member
127
star this property label Biography information for Lord Prior of Brampton more like this
star this property tabling member
302
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Rooker more like this