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1141731
star this property registered interest false remove filter
unstar this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Help to Buy Scheme: Scotland more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many people have benefited from the Help to Buy ISA in (a) north east Scotland and (b) West Aberdeenshire and Kincardine; and what the cost to the public purse was of that policy in those areas since the introduction of that scheme. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency West Aberdeenshire and Kincardine more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Andrew Bowie more like this
star this property uin 281795 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-09-05more like thismore than 2019-09-05
star this property answer text We do not hold Help to Buy: ISA data specifically for the North East of Scotland or West Aberdeenshire and Kincardine. However, since the introduction of the scheme, the number of First Time Buyers that have benefitted from the Help to Buy: ISA in Scotland is 20,921, with 629 being in Aberdeenshire. The value of the bonuses paid to help people onto the housing ladder in Scotland is £23,230,645 and of this, £738,986 worth of bonuses were paid in Aberdeenshire.<p> </p>This information is available in the Help to Buy: ISA accompanying tables as of March 2019 available here: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/help-to-buy-isa-scheme-quarterly-statistics-december-2015-to-march-2019" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/help-to-buy-isa-scheme-quarterly-statistics-december-2015-to-march-2019</a> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Salisbury more like this
star this property answering member printed John Glen more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-09-05T10:03:31.75Zmore like thismore than 2019-09-05T10:03:31.75Z
star this property answering member
4051
star this property label Biography information for John Glen more like this
star this property tabling member
4601
unstar this property label Biography information for Andrew Bowie more like this
1141934
star this property registered interest false remove filter
unstar this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Banks: Loans more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they or the Prudential Regulation Authority monitor loans by smaller banks to related parties; and what assessment, if any, they have made of how Wyelands Bank complies in this respect with regulatory limits. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Myners more like this
star this property uin HL17478 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-08-06more like thismore than 2019-08-06
star this property answer text This is a matter for the Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA), which is operationally independent from Government. The question has been passed on to the PRA. The PRA will reply directly to Lord Myners by letter. A copy of the letter will be placed in the Library of the House. more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-08-06T13:37:27.17Zmore like thismore than 2019-08-06T13:37:27.17Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
3869
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Myners more like this
1141829
star this property registered interest false remove filter
unstar this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Tobacco more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what information his Department (a) collects and (b) publishes on (i) tobacco sales, (ii) profits, (iii) marketing and (iv) research. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Linlithgow and East Falkirk more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Martyn Day more like this
star this property uin 281814 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-09-03more like thismore than 2019-09-03
star this property answer text HM Treasury does not collect data on tobacco sales, profits, marketing or research. HM Revenue &amp; Customs does collect those financial records necessary to establish tax liabilities of individual tobacco companies and retailers. Any financial data collected for this purpose is subject to taxpayer confidentiality and not published by HMRC. more like this
star this property answering member constituency Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland more like this
star this property answering member printed Mr Simon Clarke more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-09-03T07:51:36.107Zmore like thismore than 2019-09-03T07:51:36.107Z
star this property answering member
4655
star this property label Biography information for Mr Simon Clarke more like this
star this property tabling member
4488
unstar this property label Biography information for Martyn Day more like this
1141712
star this property registered interest false remove filter
unstar this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Energy: Tax Allowances more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment the Government has made of the potential merits of reinstating tax relief for investors in community energy schemes. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Ealing Central and Acton more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Dr Rupa Huq more like this
star this property uin 281785 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-09-09more like thismore than 2019-09-09
star this property answer text <p>The venture capital tax reliefs are intended to incentivise investment in higher risk companies who struggle to access finance. Energy generation was excluded from these schemes in 2016 in response to evidence of such investments being used for tax planning purposes. The Government has no current plans to reinstate eligibility for community energy schemes.</p><p> </p><p>The Government offers other forms of support to community energy projects, including through five new regional Local Energy Hubs, the new Smart Export Guarantee and the £10m Rural Community Energy Fund.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Hereford and South Herefordshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Jesse Norman more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-09-09T13:02:16.48Zmore like thismore than 2019-09-09T13:02:16.48Z
star this property answering member
3991
star this property label Biography information for Jesse Norman more like this
star this property tabling member
4511
unstar this property label Biography information for Dr Rupa Huq more like this
1141822
star this property registered interest false remove filter
unstar this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Infrastructure more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 15 October 2018 to Question 174781 on Infrastructure, when the Government plans to publish its full response to the National Infrastructure Commission’s report of July 2018 entitled National Infrastructure Assessment. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Kilmarnock and Loudoun more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Alan Brown more like this
star this property uin 281813 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-09-03more like thismore than 2019-09-03
star this property answer text <p>The government welcomed the publication of the National Infrastructure Commission’s National Infrastructure Assessment (NIA) last year.</p><p>The Government will respond in full to the NIA through a National Infrastructure Strategy.</p><p>The Chancellor confirmed on August 9th that the Strategy will be published in autumn 2019.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland more like this
star this property answering member printed Mr Simon Clarke more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-09-03T07:04:30.217Zmore like thismore than 2019-09-03T07:04:30.217Z
star this property answering member
4655
star this property label Biography information for Mr Simon Clarke more like this
star this property tabling member
4470
unstar this property label Biography information for Alan Brown more like this
1141857
star this property registered interest false remove filter
unstar this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Bank Services more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent estimate he has made of the percentage of adults in the UK who do not have a UK bank account. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Vale of Clwyd more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Chris Ruane more like this
star this property uin 281634 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-09-03more like thismore than 2019-09-03
star this property answer text <p>The Treasury does not make assessments of the number of people who do not have a bank account. However, in 2017, the Financial Conduct Authority published the results of the Financial Lives Survey which found that 1.3 million UK adults were unbanked, i.e. have no current account or alternative e-money account.</p><p> </p><p>The Financial Lives Survey report contains further information on the characteristics of the unbanked. The report analyses survey results across the four nations of the UK, the nine regions of England, and by rural and urban areas. The FCA intend to repeat the Financial Lives Survey on a regular basis in future. The report can be found here:</p><p> </p><p><a href="https://www.fca.org.uk/publication/research/financial-lives-consumers-across-uk.pdf" target="_blank">https://www.fca.org.uk/publication/research/financial-lives-consumers-across-uk.pdf</a></p><p> </p><p>This government is committed to building an economy where everyone, regardless of their background or income, can access the financial services and products they need, including a bank account. Under the Payment Account Regulations 2015 (PARs) the nine largest personal current account providers in the UK are legally required to offer fee-free basic bank accounts to customers who do not have a bank account or who are ineligible for a bank’s standard current account. Accounts have all the standard payment features such as direct debits and standing orders, though no overdraft or cheque book facilities. The Treasury’s December 2018 publication shows that in total there are nearly 7.5 million basic bank accounts open in the UK.</p><p> </p><p>More generally, in November 2017, the Government announced the creation of the Financial Inclusion Policy Forum. The Forum has now met three times and has successfully brought together key leaders from industry, charities and consumer groups, as well as Government ministers and the regulators, to provide leadership in tackling financial exclusion. The Forum has delivered important work already, and made tangible progress. A sub-group of the Forum set up last summer, examined the issue of access to affordable credit, and made a number of recommendations, many of which formed part of a package on affordable credit presented at Budget 2018. The Government also published its first annual financial inclusion report on 25 March which takes stock of the Government’s progress in this area.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Salisbury more like this
star this property answering member printed John Glen more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-09-03T07:03:54.663Zmore like thismore than 2019-09-03T07:03:54.663Z
star this property answering member
4051
star this property label Biography information for John Glen more like this
star this property attachment
1
star this property file name Financial Lives Survey - page 47.pdf more like this
star this property title Page 47 from report as mentioned in the response more like this
star this property tabling member
534
unstar this property label Biography information for Chris Ruane more like this
1141856
star this property registered interest false remove filter
unstar this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Bank Services: Fees and Charges more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that UK banks fulfuil their obligations under the EU Payment Accounts Directive; and whether he plans to retain the consumer protections in that directive after the UK leaves the EU. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Vale of Clwyd more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Chris Ruane more like this
star this property uin 281633 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-09-03more like thismore than 2019-09-03
star this property answer text <p>The Payment Accounts Directive 2014 has three main objectives: (1) to improve the transparency and comparability of fees related to payment accounts that are used for day-to-day payment transactions; (2) to facilitate the switching of those accounts; and (3) to ensure access to payment accounts with basic features (‘basic bank accounts’) for EU residents. The Payment Accounts Regulations 2015 (PARs) transposed this Directive into UK law.</p><p> </p><p>The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) is responsible for monitoring and enforcing the Payment Accounts Regulations’ requirements on payment service providers. The Payment Systems Regulator (PSR) is responsible for designating and monitoring alternative switching schemes.</p><p> </p><p>Designated UK banks must provide accessible information and assistance about the features and conditions of basic bank accounts under the Payment Accounts Regulations (PARs). The PARs also require the FCA to gather and submit to HM Treasury certain data on basic bank accounts and the switching of payment accounts. This information is reported to HM Treasury every two years. HM Treasury also collects data on basic bank accounts and this is published annually.</p><p> </p><p>The Government has amended the PARs to ensure that they continue to operate effectively in the UK once the UK has left the EU.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Salisbury more like this
star this property answering member printed John Glen more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-09-03T07:03:34.637Zmore like thismore than 2019-09-03T07:03:34.637Z
star this property answering member
4051
star this property label Biography information for John Glen more like this
star this property tabling member
534
unstar this property label Biography information for Chris Ruane more like this
1141667
star this property registered interest false remove filter
unstar this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Occupational Health more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the findings of the John Lewis Partnership Working Well report, published on 11 June 2019 on the benefits to public services of greater workplace health prevention and early intervention; and what steps he plans to take ensure that taxation incentivises early intervention from employers. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Filton and Bradley Stoke more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Jack Lopresti more like this
star this property uin 281709 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-09-09more like thismore than 2019-09-09
star this property answer text <p>The Government recognises the valuable work of employers such as the John Lewis Partnership in providing for the health of their staff.</p><p> </p><p>Employers have a critical role to play in helping disabled people and people with long-term health conditions to remain in work. Keeping more people in work is good for them. But it is good for the economy too, and it reduces spending on out-of-work benefits, and potentially also demand on the NHS. For employers, investing in employee health and wellbeing can lead to increased workforce productivity and help retain key talent in an organisation.</p><p> </p><p>Employers normally incur expenditure on employee healthcare for a business purpose and can already deduct this in full when calculating their taxable profits under the longstanding general rules for business expenses. This means employers already receive full tax relief for these costs. The Government therefore does not believe that the existing tax system for business expenses incurred by employers provides a barrier to those wishing to support employees at work.</p><p> </p><p>The tax system also ensures employees do not pay income tax or National Insurance Contributions (NICs) on several employer-provided, health-related benefits and there is no corresponding Class 1A NICs liability for employers when there is an exemption for income tax. This includes recommended medical treatment of up to £500 intended to help employees return to work.</p><p> </p><p>This particular exemption is targeted at supporting individuals who are expected to reach or who have already reached four weeks of sickness absence. This is because evidence suggests there is an increased likelihood of employees moving on to benefits after an absence lasting four weeks or longer. The £500 cap is in line with the estimated annual cost of the medical treatment that would typically be recommended to help employees return to work.</p><p> </p><p>In July, the Government launched a consultation on measures to reduce ill health-related job loss. The broad focus of this consultation chimes with recommendations in the John Lewis report, including potential financial incentives to encourage more employers to access occupational health services, driving early and supportive employer action and spreading best practice. However, it also notes that there is limited evidence that making the tax treatment more generous is the most effective lever to incentivise more employers to start offering occupational health provision, if the initial cost is the main barrier for them.</p><p> </p><p>The Government will use the evidence and views gathered during this consultation to develop its proposals further, considering an approach which offers the best value for money and is affordable in the context of the next Spending Review.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Hereford and South Herefordshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Jesse Norman more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
281710 more like this
281711 more like this
281712 more like this
281713 more like this
281714 more like this
281715 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-09-09T13:08:28.083Zmore like thismore than 2019-09-09T13:08:28.083Z
star this property answering member
3991
star this property label Biography information for Jesse Norman more like this
star this property tabling member
3989
unstar this property label Biography information for Jack Lopresti more like this
1141668
star this property registered interest false remove filter
unstar this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Occupational Health: Cost Effectiveness more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential benefit to the public purse of workers receiving workplace medical treatment at work instead of after 28 consecutive days of absence. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Filton and Bradley Stoke more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Jack Lopresti more like this
star this property uin 281710 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-09-09more like thismore than 2019-09-09
star this property answer text <p>The Government recognises the valuable work of employers such as the John Lewis Partnership in providing for the health of their staff.</p><p> </p><p>Employers have a critical role to play in helping disabled people and people with long-term health conditions to remain in work. Keeping more people in work is good for them. But it is good for the economy too, and it reduces spending on out-of-work benefits, and potentially also demand on the NHS. For employers, investing in employee health and wellbeing can lead to increased workforce productivity and help retain key talent in an organisation.</p><p> </p><p>Employers normally incur expenditure on employee healthcare for a business purpose and can already deduct this in full when calculating their taxable profits under the longstanding general rules for business expenses. This means employers already receive full tax relief for these costs. The Government therefore does not believe that the existing tax system for business expenses incurred by employers provides a barrier to those wishing to support employees at work.</p><p> </p><p>The tax system also ensures employees do not pay income tax or National Insurance Contributions (NICs) on several employer-provided, health-related benefits and there is no corresponding Class 1A NICs liability for employers when there is an exemption for income tax. This includes recommended medical treatment of up to £500 intended to help employees return to work.</p><p> </p><p>This particular exemption is targeted at supporting individuals who are expected to reach or who have already reached four weeks of sickness absence. This is because evidence suggests there is an increased likelihood of employees moving on to benefits after an absence lasting four weeks or longer. The £500 cap is in line with the estimated annual cost of the medical treatment that would typically be recommended to help employees return to work.</p><p> </p><p>In July, the Government launched a consultation on measures to reduce ill health-related job loss. The broad focus of this consultation chimes with recommendations in the John Lewis report, including potential financial incentives to encourage more employers to access occupational health services, driving early and supportive employer action and spreading best practice. However, it also notes that there is limited evidence that making the tax treatment more generous is the most effective lever to incentivise more employers to start offering occupational health provision, if the initial cost is the main barrier for them.</p><p> </p><p>The Government will use the evidence and views gathered during this consultation to develop its proposals further, considering an approach which offers the best value for money and is affordable in the context of the next Spending Review.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Hereford and South Herefordshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Jesse Norman more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
281709 more like this
281711 more like this
281712 more like this
281713 more like this
281714 more like this
281715 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-09-09T13:08:28.133Zmore like thismore than 2019-09-09T13:08:28.133Z
star this property answering member
3991
star this property label Biography information for Jesse Norman more like this
star this property tabling member
3989
unstar this property label Biography information for Jack Lopresti more like this
1141669
star this property registered interest false remove filter
unstar this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Occupational Health: Taxation more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect of the taxation of employees with occupational health support on the take-up of those services by low paid workers. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Filton and Bradley Stoke more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Jack Lopresti more like this
star this property uin 281711 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-09-09more like thismore than 2019-09-09
star this property answer text <p>The Government recognises the valuable work of employers such as the John Lewis Partnership in providing for the health of their staff.</p><p> </p><p>Employers have a critical role to play in helping disabled people and people with long-term health conditions to remain in work. Keeping more people in work is good for them. But it is good for the economy too, and it reduces spending on out-of-work benefits, and potentially also demand on the NHS. For employers, investing in employee health and wellbeing can lead to increased workforce productivity and help retain key talent in an organisation.</p><p> </p><p>Employers normally incur expenditure on employee healthcare for a business purpose and can already deduct this in full when calculating their taxable profits under the longstanding general rules for business expenses. This means employers already receive full tax relief for these costs. The Government therefore does not believe that the existing tax system for business expenses incurred by employers provides a barrier to those wishing to support employees at work.</p><p> </p><p>The tax system also ensures employees do not pay income tax or National Insurance Contributions (NICs) on several employer-provided, health-related benefits and there is no corresponding Class 1A NICs liability for employers when there is an exemption for income tax. This includes recommended medical treatment of up to £500 intended to help employees return to work.</p><p> </p><p>This particular exemption is targeted at supporting individuals who are expected to reach or who have already reached four weeks of sickness absence. This is because evidence suggests there is an increased likelihood of employees moving on to benefits after an absence lasting four weeks or longer. The £500 cap is in line with the estimated annual cost of the medical treatment that would typically be recommended to help employees return to work.</p><p> </p><p>In July, the Government launched a consultation on measures to reduce ill health-related job loss. The broad focus of this consultation chimes with recommendations in the John Lewis report, including potential financial incentives to encourage more employers to access occupational health services, driving early and supportive employer action and spreading best practice. However, it also notes that there is limited evidence that making the tax treatment more generous is the most effective lever to incentivise more employers to start offering occupational health provision, if the initial cost is the main barrier for them.</p><p> </p><p>The Government will use the evidence and views gathered during this consultation to develop its proposals further, considering an approach which offers the best value for money and is affordable in the context of the next Spending Review.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Hereford and South Herefordshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Jesse Norman more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
281709 more like this
281710 more like this
281712 more like this
281713 more like this
281714 more like this
281715 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-09-09T13:08:28.18Zmore like thismore than 2019-09-09T13:08:28.18Z
star this property answering member
3991
star this property label Biography information for Jesse Norman more like this
star this property tabling member
3989
unstar this property label Biography information for Jack Lopresti more like this