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1126504
registered interest false more like this
date remove filter
answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
answering dept id 13 more like this
answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs remove filter
hansard heading Animal Welfare more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will make it his policy to (a) ensure local authorities have a duty to provide access to a fully trained Animal Welfare Inspector with responsibility for enforcement of the Animal Welfare Act 2006 and (b) provide additional funding for that role; what estimate he has made of the number of local authorities that do not employ an Animal Welfare Inspector; and if he will make a statement. more like this
tabling member constituency Brighton, Pavilion more like this
tabling member printed
Caroline Lucas more like this
uin 254174 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-05-21more like thisremove minimum value filter
answer text <p>Under the Animal Welfare Act 2006, local authorities, the Animal &amp; Plant Health Agency and the police all have powers of entry to inspect complaints of suspected animal cruelty and take out prosecutions where necessary. Local authorities must be able to make decisions based on local needs and resource priorities and the arrangements that work best for them. It is for local authorities to determine how to prioritise their resources. We do not hold data centrally on the number of inspectors appointed under the Act.</p><p> </p><p>Local authorities will often work in close partnership with others, such as the RSPCA, to ensure that the welfare of animals is protected. The Animal Welfare Act 2006 allows anyone to be able to investigate allegations of animal neglect and if necessary take forward a prosecution and it is on this basis that the RSPCA have been enforcing animal welfare legislation in this country. Although they have no specific powers under the 2006 Act, the RSPCA do investigate allegations of cruelty and successfully prosecute 800 to 1,000 people each year.</p><p> </p>
answering member constituency Macclesfield more like this
answering member printed David Rutley more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-05-21T14:57:36.117Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-21T14:57:36.117Z
answering member
4033
label Biography information for David Rutley more like this
tabling member
3930
label Biography information for Caroline Lucas more like this
1126606
registered interest false more like this
date remove filter
answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
answering dept id 13 more like this
answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs remove filter
hansard heading Farmers: Suicide more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to suicides in the farming sector, what steps he is taking to monitor levels of distress in that sector. more like this
tabling member constituency Stroud more like this
tabling member printed
Dr David Drew more like this
uin 254107 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-05-21more like thisremove minimum value filter
answer text <p>Defra takes the issue of farmers and agricultural workers’ wellbeing very seriously. I am aware that rates of suicide are higher across the agricultural sector generally than they are for the general population. I know that they often have a solitary lifestyle, it is hard work and their businesses are subject to unpredictable factors such as the weather. As part of the Future Farming programme we are looking at the impact of policies on wellbeing, and we are also working with partners to foster personal and business resilience.</p><p> </p><p>As part of our on-going work using data on the farming sector, we monitor the published ONS statistics on suicides by employment group. As well as headline mortality numbers, we keep under review the issues that may affect broader experiences of positive and negative wellbeing.</p><p> </p><p>Officials meet regularly with farming and rural charities to hear first-hand about resilience in the farming sector. This provides an indication of how farmers and farm workers are responding to any pressures affecting the sector.</p><p> </p><p>Government launched its first ever Loneliness Strategy in October 2018. One of Defra’s commitments is to hold regular stakeholder roundtables to tackle the issues of loneliness and isolation in rural areas. The next roundtable, to be chaired by Lord Gardiner, is being held on 11 June 2019. Defra also provides financial support through an annual grant of £1.7 million to Action with Communities in Rural England (ACRE), whose network of 38 rural community councils work on housing and transport issues that we know can affect farming communities.</p><p> </p><p>Defra works closely with the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) on this issue. The National Suicide Prevention Strategy highlights the higher risk of suicide experienced by certain occupational groups, and this includes agricultural occupations. Through the Strategy, DHSC has ensured that every local authority has a suicide prevention plan in place to implement tailored approaches to reducing suicides based on the needs and demographics of local communities.</p><p> </p><p>In October 2018, the Prime Minister announced the first Minister for Suicide Prevention, and she recently met the Farming Community Network to understand better the issues facing farmers.</p><p> </p><p>It is important that farmers are aware of the people they can turn to if they are going through difficult times. In particular, the farming charities – the Farming Community Network, the Royal Agricultural Benevolent Institution and the Addington Fund – all do a brilliant job in supporting farmers and their families. The National Farmers Union also has a regional network of advisers who can provide support.</p>
answering member constituency Scarborough and Whitby more like this
answering member printed Mr Robert Goodwill more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-05-21T14:49:38.47Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-21T14:49:38.47Z
answering member
1562
label Biography information for Mr Robert Goodwill more like this
tabling member
252
label Biography information for Dr David Drew more like this
1126512
registered interest false more like this
date remove filter
answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
answering dept id 13 more like this
answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs remove filter
hansard heading Veterinary Medicine: Migrant Workers more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate he has made of the number of additional accredited vets that will be required in the event that the UK leaves the EU without a deal; and if he will make a statement. more like this
tabling member constituency Ashford more like this
tabling member printed
Damian Green more like this
uin 254054 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-05-22more like thismore than 2019-05-22
answer text <p>In the event of the UK leaving the EU without a deal, all animals, products of animal origin (POAO), fish, shellfish, crustaceans, germplasm or fishery products exported from the UK to the EU will require an export health certificate (EHC). EHCs have to be certified by either a suitably accredited Official Veterinarian (OV) or, in the case of fish and fish products, either an OV or an Environmental Health Officer (EHO) employed by a local authority.</p><p> </p><p>Defra does not employ OVs or EHOs so we have engaged with the private sector and local government to identify means of increasing the number of authorised signatories available. From February we have provided free training for vets to become accredited to sign EHCs. Over 300 vets have completed the training, an increase of just under 50% in the total number of suitably qualified OVs.</p><p> </p><p>To support OVs we also created a new role of Certification Support Officer (CSO). A CSO can handle preparatory and administrative aspects of EHCs (checking documents, identifying products or sealing containers). This will free up OV time and capacity to provide the final assurance required. The number of qualified CSOs stands at 84.</p><p> </p>
answering member constituency Macclesfield more like this
answering member printed David Rutley more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-05-22T16:28:47.687Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-22T16:28:47.687Z
answering member
4033
label Biography information for David Rutley more like this
tabling member
76
label Biography information for Damian Green more like this
1126566
registered interest false more like this
date remove filter
answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
answering dept id 13 more like this
answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs remove filter
hansard heading Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs: Sick Leave more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many and what proportion of officials in his Department took sick leave for reasons relating to stress in the last 12 months; what proportion that leave was of total sick leave taken in his Department; and what the cost was to his Department of officials taking sick leave over that period. more like this
tabling member constituency Carshalton and Wallington more like this
tabling member printed
Tom Brake more like this
uin 254075 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-05-22more like thismore than 2019-05-22
answer text <p>We can confirm we have searched our records and can provide the information below. This information covers the period 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019. We do not hold data relating specifically to stress as a separate category of sick leave absence. Instead we have provided data relating to all mental health absences. This category includes psychological illnesses such as stress, depression, anxiety and any other mental health condition.</p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p><strong>How many and what proportion of officials in his Department took sick leave for reasons relating to mental health in the last 12 months</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>109 members of staff 2.25% of total staff headcount</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>What proportion that leave was of total sick leave taken in his Department</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Absences relating to mental health made up 34.9% of all sickness absences</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>What the cost was to his Department of officials taking sick leave over that period</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Total cost of mental health sickness is £427,559.55</strong></p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p>The proportion of officials taking sick leave for reasons relating to mental health has remained constant at around 2% for the last five years.</p><p> </p><p>We have various services and support mechanisms in place to support employee mental health. For example we have an internal employee led mental health ‘buddy’ network, and employees have access to an external provider Employee Assistance Programme, and Occupational Health Service. We also have a process in place for notifying and managing work related stress.</p>
answering member constituency Scarborough and Whitby more like this
answering member printed Mr Robert Goodwill more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-05-22T14:37:00.243Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-22T14:37:00.243Z
answering member
1562
label Biography information for Mr Robert Goodwill more like this
tabling member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
1126706
registered interest false more like this
date remove filter
answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
answering dept id 13 more like this
answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs remove filter
hansard heading Landfill: Hillingdon more like this
house id 2 more like this
legislature
25277
pref label House of Lords more like this
question text To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the Newyears Green Lane landfill site is a special site of contamination; and what steps the Environment Agency has taken to ensure that any drilling into that site poses no risk to the Chiltern Aquifer. more like this
tabling member printed
Baroness Jones of Moulsecoomb more like this
uin HL15723 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-05-24more like thismore than 2019-05-24
answer text <p>On 26 May 2011, in accordance with Part 2A of the Environmental Protection Act 1990, the London Borough of Hillingdon determined the land at the former ‘New Years Green Lane Landfill Site’ as Contaminated Land as defined by Section 78A (2) of the Environmental Protection Act 1990 (the Act).</p><p> </p><p>On 6 July 2011, the Environment Agency (EA) agreed to designate the land at New Years Green Landfill as a Special Site pursuant to Section 78C (6) (b) of the Act. The site is now within the regulatory control of the EA under Part IIA of the Act.</p><p> </p><p>There is no proposal to undertake any such drilling activity at the landfill site. However, the EA is involved in the technical review of any drilling proposals at this landfill. As a minimum requirement, any drilling works in the landfill or in areas where waste is suspected must utilise “clean” drilling methodologies to avoid potential cross contamination between different parts of the geology.</p> more like this
answering member printed Lord Gardiner of Kimble more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-05-24T11:40:55.563Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-24T11:40:55.563Z
answering member
4161
label Biography information for Lord Gardiner of Kimble more like this
tabling member
4297
label Biography information for Baroness Jones of Moulsecoomb more like this
1126707
registered interest false more like this
date remove filter
answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
answering dept id 13 more like this
answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs remove filter
hansard heading High Speed 2 Railway Line: Colne Valley more like this
house id 2 more like this
legislature
25277
pref label House of Lords more like this
question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of whether HS2 is compliant with the obligations of the EU Water Frameworks Directive in regards to its activity at Colne Valley; whether a risk assessment of drilling in that area has been undertaken; what assessment they have made of the impact of any such drilling on contamination of the watercourse; and what discussions they have had with HS2 about the possible risks posed by such drilling. more like this
tabling member printed
Baroness Jones of Moulsecoomb more like this
uin HL15724 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-05-24more like thismore than 2019-05-24
answer text <p>The Environment Agency (EA) continues to discuss the assessment of the potential impacts of the High Speed Two (HS2) scheme on European Water Framework Directive (WFD) status with High Speed Two Ltd (HS2 Ltd) and its contractors for the Colne Valley.</p><p>HS2 Ltd is producing a report about the impacts of the main construction works. Where the EA has issued approvals for enabling and investigation works, it has made sure that HS2 Ltd has assessed the WFD requirements.</p><p>HS2 Ltd has a Code of Construction Practice which requires its contractors to work in accordance with British Standards ‘Investigation of potentially contaminated sites’ (BS 10175:2011) and ‘Code of practice for ground investigations’ (BS 5930:2015). By following the practices set out in this guidance, drilling would not cause contamination or further mobilise any contamination already present in the ground.</p><p>The EA is working with HS2 Ltd to secure the protection of water bodies in the Colne Valley and also advises HS2 Ltd in relation to any potential environmental risks associated with the proposed construction.</p><p> </p>
answering member printed Lord Gardiner of Kimble more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-05-24T11:38:33.027Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-24T11:38:33.027Z
answering member
4161
label Biography information for Lord Gardiner of Kimble more like this
tabling member
4297
label Biography information for Baroness Jones of Moulsecoomb more like this