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1087068
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many offenders sentenced to immediate custody of up to six months who had not received a previous community order were sentenced in (a) Magistrate's Courts and (b) Crown Courts in (i) 2015; (ii) 2016 and (iii) 2017. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Shipley more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Philip Davies more like this
star this property uin 231411 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-03-20more like thismore than 2019-03-20
unstar this property answer text <p>The number of offenders sentenced to up to six months who had not received a previous community sentence by court type can be viewed in the table.</p><p> </p><p>There is persuasive evidence showing community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective than short custodial sentences in reducing reoffending. The MoJ study ‘The impact of short custodial sentences, community orders and suspended sentence orders on re-offending’ published in 2015 found that over a 1-year follow up period, a higher proportion of people re-offended having been sentenced to custody of under 12 months without supervision on release than other similar people given community orders.</p><p> </p><p>Unless we tackle the underlying causes of offending, we cannot protect the public from being victims of crime. Effective community orders can address offenders’ behaviour, answer their mental health and alcohol or drug misuse needs, and provide reparation for the benefit of the wider community.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Penrith and The Border more like this
star this property answering member printed Rory Stewart more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-03-20T16:53:20.457Zmore like thismore than 2019-03-20T16:53:20.457Z
unstar this property answering member
4137
star this property label Biography information for Rory Stewart more like this
star this property attachment
1
star this property file name PQ 231411 Table..xlsx more like this
star this property title Table more like this
star this property tabling member
1565
unstar this property label Biography information for Philip Davies more like this
1087214
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Antisocial Behaviour: Reoffenders more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the highest number of total previous offences for breach of an anti-social behaviour order or criminal behaviour order was that a person committed before being given an immediate custodial sentence for that offence in each of the last three years. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Shipley more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Philip Davies more like this
star this property uin 231414 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-03-19more like thismore than 2019-03-19
unstar this property answer text <p>Sentencing is a matter for our independent courts, who take into account all circumstances of the case, including any aggravating and mitigating factors. We are clear that sentencing must match the severity of a crime.</p><p> </p><p>However, sentences should also rehabilitate. There is persuasive evidence showing community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective than short custodial sentences in reducing reoffending. The MoJ study ‘The impact of short custodial sentences, community orders and suspended sentence orders on re-offending’ published in 2015 found that over a 1-year follow up period, a higher proportion of people re-offended having been sentenced to custody of under 12 months without supervision on release than other similar people given community orders.</p><p> </p><p>Unless we tackle the underlying causes of offending, we cannot protect the public from being victims of crime. Effective community orders can address offenders’ behaviour, answer their mental health and alcohol or drug misuse needs, and provide reparation for the benefit of the wider community.</p><p> </p><p>Data on the highest number of previous cautions and convictions for a selected offence type for a person who received their first immediate custodial sentence for the selected offence type, covering the period year ending September 2016 – year ending September 2018, can be viewed in the table.</p><p> </p><p>The data provided in the accompanying response table is sourced from MoJ's extract of the Police National Computer. As benefit fraud offences are not prosecuted by the police, we are unable to answer PQ230707.</p><p> </p><p>Caution should be exercised in drawing general conclusions from this data. By definition these are the very extremes of the system – the individuals with the very most convictions. Most significantly the 2015 study suggests that giving a short custodial sentence to a prolific offender is more, not less, likely to result in them committing another offence after custody, compared to giving them a community sentence.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Penrith and The Border more like this
star this property answering member printed Rory Stewart more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
230698 more like this
230699 more like this
230700 more like this
230701 more like this
230702 more like this
230703 more like this
230704 more like this
230705 more like this
230706 more like this
230707 more like this
231412 more like this
231413 more like this
231415 more like this
231416 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-03-19T17:54:30.557Zmore like thismore than 2019-03-19T17:54:30.557Z
unstar this property answering member
4137
star this property label Biography information for Rory Stewart more like this
star this property attachment
1
star this property file name 230698 - 230707; 231412 - 231416 Response Table.xlsx more like this
star this property title 230698 - 230707; 231412 - 231416 Response Table more like this
star this property tabling member
1565
unstar this property label Biography information for Philip Davies more like this
1087059
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Dangerous Driving: Convictions more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people have been convicted of causing serious injury by dangerous driving in each of the last five calendar years. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Heywood and Middleton more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Liz McInnes more like this
star this property uin 231487 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-03-15more like thismore than 2019-03-15
unstar this property answer text <p>The number of people who have been prosecuted, convicted and given suspended sentences or immediate custodial sentences for causing serious injury by dangerous driving, and the average custodial sentence length in each of the last five years has been published up to December 2017 and can be found in the ‘Outcomes by offence data tool’, available at the following link: <a href="https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/733981/outcomes-by-offence-tool-2017-update.xlsx" target="_blank">https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/733981/outcomes-by-offence-tool-2017-update.xlsx</a></p><p> </p><p>In the Offence filter, select ‘4.12 Causing serious injury by dangerous driving (MOT)’, and the table will populate with the proceedings and outcomes for this offence by calendar year:</p><p>Prosecutions – row 23</p><p>Convictions – row 24</p><p>Suspended sentences – row 34</p><p>Average custodial sentence length – row 54</p><p> </p><p>In the last five years, bespoke analysis shows that 3 offenders found guilty of the offence ‘causing serious injury by driving’ received a 5 year custodial sentence; 1 in 2013 and 2 in 2017.</p>
star this property answering member constituency South East Cambridgeshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
231486 more like this
231488 more like this
231489 more like this
231490 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-03-15T14:58:33.703Zmore like thismore than 2019-03-15T14:58:33.703Z
unstar this property answering member
4517
star this property label Biography information for Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property tabling member
4342
unstar this property label Biography information for Liz McInnes more like this
1087058
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Dangerous Driving: Prosecutions more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people have been prosecuted for causing serious injury by dangerous driving in each of the last five calendar years. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Heywood and Middleton more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Liz McInnes more like this
star this property uin 231486 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-03-15more like thismore than 2019-03-15
unstar this property answer text <p>The number of people who have been prosecuted, convicted and given suspended sentences or immediate custodial sentences for causing serious injury by dangerous driving, and the average custodial sentence length in each of the last five years has been published up to December 2017 and can be found in the ‘Outcomes by offence data tool’, available at the following link: <a href="https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/733981/outcomes-by-offence-tool-2017-update.xlsx" target="_blank">https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/733981/outcomes-by-offence-tool-2017-update.xlsx</a></p><p> </p><p>In the Offence filter, select ‘4.12 Causing serious injury by dangerous driving (MOT)’, and the table will populate with the proceedings and outcomes for this offence by calendar year:</p><p>Prosecutions – row 23</p><p>Convictions – row 24</p><p>Suspended sentences – row 34</p><p>Average custodial sentence length – row 54</p><p> </p><p>In the last five years, bespoke analysis shows that 3 offenders found guilty of the offence ‘causing serious injury by driving’ received a 5 year custodial sentence; 1 in 2013 and 2 in 2017.</p>
star this property answering member constituency South East Cambridgeshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
231487 more like this
231488 more like this
231489 more like this
231490 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-03-15T14:58:33.75Zmore like thismore than 2019-03-15T14:58:33.75Z
unstar this property answering member
4517
star this property label Biography information for Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property tabling member
4342
unstar this property label Biography information for Liz McInnes more like this
1087061
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Dangerous Driving: Sentencing more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people convicted of causing serious injury by dangerous driving received a suspended sentence in each of the last five calendar years. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Heywood and Middleton more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Liz McInnes more like this
star this property uin 231488 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-03-15more like thismore than 2019-03-15
unstar this property answer text <p>The number of people who have been prosecuted, convicted and given suspended sentences or immediate custodial sentences for causing serious injury by dangerous driving, and the average custodial sentence length in each of the last five years has been published up to December 2017 and can be found in the ‘Outcomes by offence data tool’, available at the following link: <a href="https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/733981/outcomes-by-offence-tool-2017-update.xlsx" target="_blank">https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/733981/outcomes-by-offence-tool-2017-update.xlsx</a></p><p> </p><p>In the Offence filter, select ‘4.12 Causing serious injury by dangerous driving (MOT)’, and the table will populate with the proceedings and outcomes for this offence by calendar year:</p><p>Prosecutions – row 23</p><p>Convictions – row 24</p><p>Suspended sentences – row 34</p><p>Average custodial sentence length – row 54</p><p> </p><p>In the last five years, bespoke analysis shows that 3 offenders found guilty of the offence ‘causing serious injury by driving’ received a 5 year custodial sentence; 1 in 2013 and 2 in 2017.</p>
star this property answering member constituency South East Cambridgeshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
231486 more like this
231487 more like this
231489 more like this
231490 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-03-15T14:58:33.797Zmore like thismore than 2019-03-15T14:58:33.797Z
unstar this property answering member
4517
star this property label Biography information for Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property tabling member
4342
unstar this property label Biography information for Liz McInnes more like this
1087062
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Dangerous Driving: Sentencing more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average prison sentence given to people jailed for causing serious injury by dangerous driving was in each of the last five calendar years. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Heywood and Middleton more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Liz McInnes more like this
star this property uin 231489 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-03-15more like thismore than 2019-03-15
unstar this property answer text <p>The number of people who have been prosecuted, convicted and given suspended sentences or immediate custodial sentences for causing serious injury by dangerous driving, and the average custodial sentence length in each of the last five years has been published up to December 2017 and can be found in the ‘Outcomes by offence data tool’, available at the following link: <a href="https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/733981/outcomes-by-offence-tool-2017-update.xlsx" target="_blank">https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/733981/outcomes-by-offence-tool-2017-update.xlsx</a></p><p> </p><p>In the Offence filter, select ‘4.12 Causing serious injury by dangerous driving (MOT)’, and the table will populate with the proceedings and outcomes for this offence by calendar year:</p><p>Prosecutions – row 23</p><p>Convictions – row 24</p><p>Suspended sentences – row 34</p><p>Average custodial sentence length – row 54</p><p> </p><p>In the last five years, bespoke analysis shows that 3 offenders found guilty of the offence ‘causing serious injury by driving’ received a 5 year custodial sentence; 1 in 2013 and 2 in 2017.</p>
star this property answering member constituency South East Cambridgeshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
231486 more like this
231487 more like this
231488 more like this
231490 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-03-15T14:58:33.843Zmore like thismore than 2019-03-15T14:58:33.843Z
unstar this property answering member
4517
star this property label Biography information for Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property tabling member
4342
unstar this property label Biography information for Liz McInnes more like this
1087064
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Dangerous Driving: Sentencing more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people convicted of causing serious injury by dangerous driving received the maximum five year jail sentence in each of the last five calendar years. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Heywood and Middleton more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Liz McInnes more like this
star this property uin 231490 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-03-15more like thismore than 2019-03-15
unstar this property answer text <p>The number of people who have been prosecuted, convicted and given suspended sentences or immediate custodial sentences for causing serious injury by dangerous driving, and the average custodial sentence length in each of the last five years has been published up to December 2017 and can be found in the ‘Outcomes by offence data tool’, available at the following link: <a href="https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/733981/outcomes-by-offence-tool-2017-update.xlsx" target="_blank">https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/733981/outcomes-by-offence-tool-2017-update.xlsx</a></p><p> </p><p>In the Offence filter, select ‘4.12 Causing serious injury by dangerous driving (MOT)’, and the table will populate with the proceedings and outcomes for this offence by calendar year:</p><p>Prosecutions – row 23</p><p>Convictions – row 24</p><p>Suspended sentences – row 34</p><p>Average custodial sentence length – row 54</p><p> </p><p>In the last five years, bespoke analysis shows that 3 offenders found guilty of the offence ‘causing serious injury by driving’ received a 5 year custodial sentence; 1 in 2013 and 2 in 2017.</p>
star this property answering member constituency South East Cambridgeshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
231486 more like this
231487 more like this
231488 more like this
231489 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-03-15T14:58:33.907Zmore like thismore than 2019-03-15T14:58:33.907Z
unstar this property answering member
4517
star this property label Biography information for Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property tabling member
4342
unstar this property label Biography information for Liz McInnes more like this
1087211
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Drugs: Reoffenders more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the highest number of total previous offences relating to drugs was that a person committed before being given an immediate custodial sentence for that offence in each of the last three years. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Shipley more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Philip Davies more like this
star this property uin 231412 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-03-19more like thismore than 2019-03-19
unstar this property answer text <p>Sentencing is a matter for our independent courts, who take into account all circumstances of the case, including any aggravating and mitigating factors. We are clear that sentencing must match the severity of a crime.</p><p> </p><p>However, sentences should also rehabilitate. There is persuasive evidence showing community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective than short custodial sentences in reducing reoffending. The MoJ study ‘The impact of short custodial sentences, community orders and suspended sentence orders on re-offending’ published in 2015 found that over a 1-year follow up period, a higher proportion of people re-offended having been sentenced to custody of under 12 months without supervision on release than other similar people given community orders.</p><p> </p><p>Unless we tackle the underlying causes of offending, we cannot protect the public from being victims of crime. Effective community orders can address offenders’ behaviour, answer their mental health and alcohol or drug misuse needs, and provide reparation for the benefit of the wider community.</p><p> </p><p>Data on the highest number of previous cautions and convictions for a selected offence type for a person who received their first immediate custodial sentence for the selected offence type, covering the period year ending September 2016 – year ending September 2018, can be viewed in the table.</p><p> </p><p>The data provided in the accompanying response table is sourced from MoJ's extract of the Police National Computer. As benefit fraud offences are not prosecuted by the police, we are unable to answer PQ230707.</p><p> </p><p>Caution should be exercised in drawing general conclusions from this data. By definition these are the very extremes of the system – the individuals with the very most convictions. Most significantly the 2015 study suggests that giving a short custodial sentence to a prolific offender is more, not less, likely to result in them committing another offence after custody, compared to giving them a community sentence.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Penrith and The Border more like this
star this property answering member printed Rory Stewart more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
230698 more like this
230699 more like this
230700 more like this
230701 more like this
230702 more like this
230703 more like this
230704 more like this
230705 more like this
230706 more like this
230707 more like this
231413 more like this
231414 more like this
231415 more like this
231416 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-03-19T17:54:29.56Zmore like thismore than 2019-03-19T17:54:29.56Z
unstar this property answering member
4137
star this property label Biography information for Rory Stewart more like this
star this property attachment
1
star this property file name 230698 - 230707; 231412 - 231416 Response Table.xlsx more like this
star this property title 230698 - 230707; 231412 - 231416 Response Table more like this
star this property tabling member
1565
unstar this property label Biography information for Philip Davies more like this
1087215
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Fraud: Reoffenders more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the highest number of total previous offences for fraud was that a person committed before being given an immediate custodial sentence for that offence in each of the last three years. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Shipley more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Philip Davies more like this
star this property uin 231415 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-03-19more like thismore than 2019-03-19
unstar this property answer text <p>Sentencing is a matter for our independent courts, who take into account all circumstances of the case, including any aggravating and mitigating factors. We are clear that sentencing must match the severity of a crime.</p><p> </p><p>However, sentences should also rehabilitate. There is persuasive evidence showing community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective than short custodial sentences in reducing reoffending. The MoJ study ‘The impact of short custodial sentences, community orders and suspended sentence orders on re-offending’ published in 2015 found that over a 1-year follow up period, a higher proportion of people re-offended having been sentenced to custody of under 12 months without supervision on release than other similar people given community orders.</p><p> </p><p>Unless we tackle the underlying causes of offending, we cannot protect the public from being victims of crime. Effective community orders can address offenders’ behaviour, answer their mental health and alcohol or drug misuse needs, and provide reparation for the benefit of the wider community.</p><p> </p><p>Data on the highest number of previous cautions and convictions for a selected offence type for a person who received their first immediate custodial sentence for the selected offence type, covering the period year ending September 2016 – year ending September 2018, can be viewed in the table.</p><p> </p><p>The data provided in the accompanying response table is sourced from MoJ's extract of the Police National Computer. As benefit fraud offences are not prosecuted by the police, we are unable to answer PQ230707.</p><p> </p><p>Caution should be exercised in drawing general conclusions from this data. By definition these are the very extremes of the system – the individuals with the very most convictions. Most significantly the 2015 study suggests that giving a short custodial sentence to a prolific offender is more, not less, likely to result in them committing another offence after custody, compared to giving them a community sentence.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Penrith and The Border more like this
star this property answering member printed Rory Stewart more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
230698 more like this
230699 more like this
230700 more like this
230701 more like this
230702 more like this
230703 more like this
230704 more like this
230705 more like this
230706 more like this
230707 more like this
231412 more like this
231413 more like this
231414 more like this
231416 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-03-19T17:54:30.653Zmore like thismore than 2019-03-19T17:54:30.653Z
unstar this property answering member
4137
star this property label Biography information for Rory Stewart more like this
star this property attachment
1
star this property file name 230698 - 230707; 231412 - 231416 Response Table.xlsx more like this
star this property title 230698 - 230707; 231412 - 231416 Response Table more like this
star this property tabling member
1565
unstar this property label Biography information for Philip Davies more like this
1087158
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Knives: Crime more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of trends in the number of people under the age of 18 being prosecuted for possession of a knife (a) Wansbeck constituency, (b) the North East and (c) the UK since 2010. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Wansbeck more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Ian Lavery more like this
star this property uin 231469 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-03-20more like thismore than 2019-03-20
unstar this property answer text <p>The Ministry of Justice publishes data on prosecutions for England and Wales by Police Force Area. The number of defendants aged under 18 who were prosecuted for possession of an article with a blade or point, by police force area can be found in the Court outcomes by Police Force Area data tool found here: <a href="https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/733996/court-outcomes-by-pfa-2017-update.xlsx" target="_blank">https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/733996/court-outcomes-by-pfa-2017-update.xlsx</a></p><p> </p><ul><li>The Wansbeck constituency falls within the ‘Northumbria’ Police Force Area, which can be selected in the ‘Police Force Area’ filter.</li><li>To identify the <strong>North East</strong>, select ‘Cleveland’, ‘Durham’ and ‘Northumbria’ in the ‘Police Force Area’ filter.</li><li>For the number of prosecutions, filter ‘Court Type’ by ’02: Magistrates Court’.</li><li>For defendants aged under 18, select the relevant age ranges in the ‘Age Range’ filter.</li><li>Select ‘10D Possession of an article with blade or point’ in the ‘Offence’ filter.</li></ul><p> </p><p>Figures for 2018 will be published in May 2019.</p><p> </p><p>The MoJ does not hold figures for prosecutions by parliamentary constituency, or for other countries of the UK.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Penrith and The Border more like this
star this property answering member printed Rory Stewart more like this
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less than 2019-03-20T17:27:22.47Zmore like thismore than 2019-03-20T17:27:22.47Z
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star this property label Biography information for Rory Stewart more like this
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unstar this property label Biography information for Ian Lavery more like this