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451696
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>At the “Supporting Syria and the Region London 2016” Conference we co-hosted on 4<sup>th</sup> February 2016, leaders came together to pledge more than $11 billion, the largest amount raised in one day for a humanitarian crisis. Commitments made at the Conference will help to create 1.1 million jobs and provide education to an additional 1 million children. This money will save lives, give hope and give people a chance for the future. The Conference also brought leaders together to praise the bravery of all those working inside Syria to protect innocent civilians, demand an end to these abuses and obstruction of humanitarian aid. The outcomes of the conference are reflected in the Co-hosts' statement available on the Conference website <a href="http://www.supportingsyria2016.com/" target="_blank">www.supportingsyria2016.com</a>.</p><p> </p><p>We are deeply concerned by the humanitarian impact of the ongoing Syrian regime offensive on Aleppo, which is backed by Russian airstrikes; including the high level of displacement it is causing.</p><p><strong> </strong></p><p>DFID continues to use existing funding to support our partners to be flexible in their responses and to enable the realignment of programming to meet those newly displaced and most in need. We are working with our partners in Aleppo and Idlib governorates to increase their existing food distribution and primary health assistance to support the newly displaced. We also support the UN OCHA managed, Humanitarian Pooled Fund (HPF), which has announced a US$10.5 million emergency fund to meet the needs of the new displaced as a result of the fighting in northern Aleppo. The HPF funding will focus on meeting key health, WASH, food, shelter and protection needs.</p>
unstar this property tabling member 4243
452077
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>To date, the UK has committed £79.5 million to the humanitarian crisis in Iraq. UK aid is reaching hundreds of thousands of people across Iraq, including the most vulnerable groups, such as Yezidis. All UK-funded aid is distributed on the basis of needs and in line with humanitarian principles which ensure that no-one is discriminated against on the grounds of race, religion or ethnicity . According to the International Organisation for Migration, the vast majority of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) in Iraq live in host communities, with around 10% of all Iraqi IDPs living in camps.</p><p> </p><p>On a field visit to Dohuk in January 2016, DFID officials met with a number of displaced Iraqis, including Yezidis, and discussed their shelter needs and living conditions. This included members of the Yezidi community who were living in poor conditions in informal settlements. The DFID team were told that the UN High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) had undertaken to relocate these individuals to a camp with appropriate services and conditions. However, this offer had been declined by Yezidi heads of households because of a perception that the camps were too far from employment opportunities although it appeared that other members of the community held differing views about the suitability of the camps.</p><p> </p>
unstar this property tabling member 413
452078
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>Through the cross-Departmental Conflict Stability and Security Fund (CSSF), the UK has allocated £10 million in Iraq for 2015/16 to fund security and stabilisation work.</p><p>£2.5 million of this support has been pledged to the UN Development Programme’s (UNDP) Funding Facility for Immediate Stabilisation (FFIS). The FFIS is the principle mechanism for international support to stabilisation in Iraq and works to priorities set by the Iraqi authorities.</p><p>Assessments in Sinjar by the UNDP and other partners are proceeding. It is expected that FFIS-supported stabilisation activities will start in the near future.</p> more like this
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452490
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>The UK is one of the leading donors on tax and development and we have committed to double our support on tax by 2020 as part of the Addis Tax Initiative. DFID is currently engaged in, or developing, tax reform in 26 of our 28 priority countries. This includes support from the Tax Capacity Building Unit in HMRC we established in 2013 and from international organisations such as OECD, the Global Forum and the World Bank which DFID funds to provide technical assistance to tackle tax evasion and multinational tax avoidance.</p> more like this
unstar this property tabling member 4394
452489
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>HMRC actively engages with developing countries and has recently agreed treaties with Senegal and Zambia. Tax treaties encourage the appropriate tax treatment of cross-border economic activity, promote international trade and investment and ultimately lead to sustainable tax revenues.</p> more like this
unstar this property tabling member 4394
452492
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>The DFID Palestinian Programme supports the HMG objective of protecting the viability of a two state solution. DFID’s work in the Occupied Palestinian Territories tends to consist of large-scale and strategic programmes that fit within our three priority areas; state building, economic development and alleviating poverty and vulnerability. Through the cross-government Conflict Stability and Security Fund (CSSF), the UK continues to support several projects which promote coexistence. These projects include support for the Peres Centre for Peace Training Doctors Programme which brings Israelis and Palestinians together through medical care and training to combat stereotypes and build trust. Additionally we work on projects with youth groups and through sport to encourage engagement between Israelis and Palestinians.</p> more like this
unstar this property tabling member 166
452493
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>The DFID Palestinian Programme supports the HMG objective of protecting the viability of a two state solution. DFID’s work in the Occupied Palestinian Territories tends to consist of large-scale and strategic programmes that fit within our three priority areas; state building, economic development and alleviating poverty and vulnerability. Through the cross-government Conflict Stability and Security Fund (CSSF), the UK continues to support several projects which promote coexistence. These projects include support for the Peres Centre for Peace Training Doctors Programme which brings Israelis and Palestinians together through medical care and training to combat stereotypes and build trust. Additionally we work on projects with youth groups and through sport to encourage engagement between Israelis and Palestinians.</p> more like this
unstar this property tabling member 166
451351
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>DFID’s bilateral aid expenditure in Afghanistan for 2010-11 was £99.3m and in 2011-12 was £153.9m.</p> more like this
unstar this property tabling member 4405
452157
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>The Government has not yet approved any country allocations from the Prosperity Fund.</p> more like this
unstar this property tabling member 2018
451133
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>At the Syria conference in London on 4 February, the Prime Minister announced that the UK will more than double our support in response to the Syria crisis from £1.12 billion to over £2.3 billion, our largest ever humanitarian response to a single crisis. We will consider any option compliant with international law that might save lives in Syria. However, experience suggests that so-called ‘safe’ areas can prove difficult to demilitarise and protect against all threats. In fact, there is a risk that they can become targets.</p><p>For a safe area to work, all parties to the conflict and relevant regional authorities would need to agree to its establishment. In the absence of such consent, this would require foreign military intervention, authorised by a UN Security Council Resolution. Any party seeking to establish a safe area would need to ensure sufficient military capability to guarantee safety from both aerial and ground attack, including by unconventional means. Credible measures would also be needed to prevent human rights abuses and to provide humanitarian assistance within the protected area. In addition, the existence of a ‘safe’ area near an international border should not be used to repatriate refugees against their will, or to deny access to asylum.</p><p>The UK plays a key role in ensuring humanitarian access to Syria. By 31 January 2016, at least 257 shipments of cross-border aid had been delivered as a direct result of the UK co-sponsored UN Security Council Resolutions 2165, 2191 and 2258 which enables the UN to deliver aid into Syria without the consent of the regime. We continue to call on all sides to the conflict to respect International Humanitarian Law and ensure free, unimpeded access for humanitarian agencies.</p>
unstar this property tabling member 2018