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1126322
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-13more like thismore than 2019-05-13
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Maintained Schools: Special Educational Needs more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what percentage of mainstream maintained schools in England offered Key Stage 4 alternatives to GCSEs, suitable for children with special educational, health or social care needs; how many children took such courses, in each of the last five years for which records are available; what are the most popular of those non-GCSE courses; and which organisations create them. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Lucas more like this
star this property uin HL15682 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-05-22more like thismore than 2019-05-22
star this property answer text <p>There is not a range of non-GCSE qualifications taught at key stage 4 designed specifically for pupils with special educational needs (SEN). Pupils should have access to a broad and balanced curriculum. The national curriculum inclusion statement states that teachers should set high expectations for every pupil, whatever their prior attainment. Teachers should use appropriate assessment to set targets which are deliberately ambitious. Potential areas of difficulty should be identified and addressed at the outset. Lessons should be planned to address potential areas of difficulty and to remove barriers to pupil achievement. In many cases, such planning will mean that pupils with SEN and disabilities will be able to study the full national curriculum.</p><p> </p><p>The department holds information on entries to non-GCSE qualifications included in the school performance tables, analysis of which is provided below.</p><p> </p><p>The percentage of schools (mainstream[1]) with at least one pupil at the end of key stage 4[2] entering[3] non-GCSE qualifications[4], in each of the last 5 years, is shown in the table below:</p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p>2017/18[5]</p></td><td><p>2016/17</p></td><td><p>2015/16</p></td><td><p>2014/15</p></td><td><p>2013/14</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Number of mainstream schools</p></td><td><p>3,175</p></td><td><p>3,153</p></td><td><p>3,113</p></td><td><p>3,069</p></td><td><p>3,037</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Percentage of mainstream schools</p></td><td rowspan="3"><p>95</p></td><td rowspan="3"><p>97</p></td><td rowspan="3"><p>99</p></td><td rowspan="3"><p>99</p></td><td rowspan="3"><p>99</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>with at least one pupil entering</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>a non-GCSE qualification (%)</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p> </p><p>The percentage of mainstream school pupils entering at least one non-GCSE qualification, in each of the last 5 years, is shown in the table below:</p><table><tbody><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p>2017/18</p></td><td><p>2016/17</p></td><td><p>2015/16</p></td><td><p>2014/15</p></td><td><p>2013/14</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Pupil cohort</p></td><td><p>513,356</p></td><td><p>517,756</p></td><td><p>530,580</p></td><td><p>543,314</p></td><td><p>548,290</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Percentage of mainstream pupils who sat</p></td><td rowspan="2"><p>40</p></td><td rowspan="2"><p>52</p></td><td rowspan="2"><p>72</p></td><td rowspan="2"><p>71</p></td><td rowspan="2"><p>68</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>at least one non-GCSE subject (%)</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p>Tables showing the 10 most entered non-GCSE qualifications in all state-funded mainstream schools are included in the attached spreadsheet.</p><p> </p><p>[1] State-funded mainstream schools include academies, free schools, city technology colleges and further education colleges with provision for 14 to 16 year olds. They exclude state-funded special schools, independent schools, independent special schools, non-maintained special schools, hospital schools, pupil referral units and alternative provision (AP) (including pupil referral units, AP free schools and AP academies as well as state-funded AP placements in other institutions).</p><p>[2] Pupils are identified as being at the end of key stage 4 if they were on roll at the school and in year 11 at the time of the January school census for that year. Age is calculated as at 31 August for that year, and the majority of pupils at the end of key stage 4 were age 15 at the start of the academic year. Some pupils may complete this key stage in an earlier or later year group.</p><p>[3] The department does not collect data on which qualifications are offered by schools, instead figures based on which qualifications have been entered by pupils has been used as a proxy. There may be some qualifications offered by a school that no pupils sat exams in for each year.</p><p>[4] Figures only include qualifications included in performance tables.</p><p>[5] 2017/18 figures are revised figures. All other figures are final figures.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-22T14:24:26.527Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-22T14:24:26.527Z
star this property answering member
4689
star this property label Biography information for Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property attachment
1
star this property file name HL15682_most_entered_non-GCSE_qualifications_mainstream_schools.xls more like this
star this property title HL15682_Tables more like this
star this property tabling member
1879
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Lucas more like this
1126720
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-14more like thismore than 2019-05-14
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
unstar this property hansard heading School Day more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government, following the report by the UCL Institute of Education School break times and young people’s social lives: A follow-up national study, published in May, what assessment they have made of the impact of shortening school break times on (1) childhood obesity, (2) academic performance, and (3) children’s social lives; and what steps they are taking to address any such impact. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Pendry more like this
star this property uin HL15737 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-05-22more like thismore than 2019-05-22
star this property answer text <p>The government has not made a specific assessment of the impact of the length of school break times on obesity, academic performance or children’s social lives. Schools have the autonomy to make decisions about the structure and duration of their school day to suit their own circumstances. However, the department is clear that pupils should be given an appropriate break and expects school leaders to make sure this happens.</p><p> </p><p>The government recognises the importance of physical activity in schools to improve physical and mental wellbeing and support attainment. That is why our Childhood Obesity strategy reflects the Chief Medical Officer’s guidelines that primary age children should get at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity a day and the aim that 30 minutes of that should be during the school day.</p><p> </p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-22T15:39:32.723Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-22T15:39:32.723Z
star this property answering member
4689
star this property label Biography information for Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property tabling member
457
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Pendry more like this
1126721
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-14more like thismore than 2019-05-14
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
unstar this property hansard heading History: Curriculum more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the merits of revising the history curriculum to provide an honest and critical portrayal of the UK’s colonial history. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Pendry more like this
star this property uin HL15738 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-05-22more like thismore than 2019-05-22
star this property answer text <p>The current national curriculum programmes of study for history, which have been taught since September 2014, set the framework for the teaching of the subject in maintained schools in terms of the broad time periods and themes to be taught. Academies may design and follow their own curricula.</p><p> </p><p>The government does not specify what the content of lessons on particular topics should be or how teachers should present information. We trust teachers, as professionals, to plan their own lessons and select their own resources.</p><p> </p><p>However, the curriculum does aim to make sure that pupils know and understand how Britain has influenced and been influenced by the wider world. Therefore, Empire and colonialism is a significant theme, and a suggested topic within the ‘challenges for Britain, Europe and the wider world 1901 to the present day’ theme is ‘Indian independence and end of Empire’.</p><p> </p><p>Programmes of study also require at least one study of a significant society or issue in world history and its interconnections with other world developments. While not mandatory, a suggested topic is ‘China’s Qing dynasty 1644-1911’, which encompasses the period within which the Opium Wars took place.</p><p> </p><p>The national curriculum programmes of study for history for key stages 1-3 are attached and are available here: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculum-in-england-history-programmes-of-study" target="_blank">www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculum-in-england-history-programmes-of-study</a>.</p><p> </p><p>We have no current plans to change the history curriculum. In order to provide a period of stability to schools, my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education has committed to making no new changes to the national curriculum during this Parliament.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property attachment
1
star this property file name HL15739_HL15738_KS1_KS2_national_curriculum_history.pdf more like this
star this property title HL15739_HL15738_PDF more like this
2
star this property file name HL15739_HL15738_KS3_national_curriculum_history.pdf more like this
star this property title HL15739_HL15738_PDF more like this
star this property grouped question UIN HL15739 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-22T14:28:16.707Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-22T14:28:16.707Z
star this property answering member
4689
star this property label Biography information for Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property tabling member
457
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Pendry more like this
1126722
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-14more like thismore than 2019-05-14
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
unstar this property hansard heading History: Curriculum more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the merits of including the Opium Wars in the history curriculum in order to facilitate a greater understanding of (1) the UK’s colonial history, and (2) UK–Chinese relations. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Pendry more like this
star this property uin HL15739 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-05-22more like thismore than 2019-05-22
star this property answer text <p>The current national curriculum programmes of study for history, which have been taught since September 2014, set the framework for the teaching of the subject in maintained schools in terms of the broad time periods and themes to be taught. Academies may design and follow their own curricula.</p><p> </p><p>The government does not specify what the content of lessons on particular topics should be or how teachers should present information. We trust teachers, as professionals, to plan their own lessons and select their own resources.</p><p> </p><p>However, the curriculum does aim to make sure that pupils know and understand how Britain has influenced and been influenced by the wider world. Therefore, Empire and colonialism is a significant theme, and a suggested topic within the ‘challenges for Britain, Europe and the wider world 1901 to the present day’ theme is ‘Indian independence and end of Empire’.</p><p> </p><p>Programmes of study also require at least one study of a significant society or issue in world history and its interconnections with other world developments. While not mandatory, a suggested topic is ‘China’s Qing dynasty 1644-1911’, which encompasses the period within which the Opium Wars took place.</p><p> </p><p>The national curriculum programmes of study for history for key stages 1-3 are attached and are available here: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculum-in-england-history-programmes-of-study" target="_blank">www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculum-in-england-history-programmes-of-study</a>.</p><p> </p><p>We have no current plans to change the history curriculum. In order to provide a period of stability to schools, my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education has committed to making no new changes to the national curriculum during this Parliament.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property attachment
1
star this property file name HL15739_HL15738_KS1_KS2_national_curriculum_history.pdf more like this
star this property title HL15739_HL15738_PDF more like this
2
star this property file name HL15739_HL15738_KS3_national_curriculum_history.pdf more like this
star this property title HL15739_HL15738_PDF more like this
star this property grouped question UIN HL15738 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-22T14:28:16.657Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-22T14:28:16.657Z
star this property answering member
4689
star this property label Biography information for Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property tabling member
457
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Pendry more like this
1127013
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-15more like thismore than 2019-05-15
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Climate Change: Education more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government, following the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of England and Wales in 2002 and Pope Francis’ encyclical on climate change Laudato Si: On Care for Our Common Home, published in 2015, what assessment they have made of the priority that teaching on climate change has been given in Catholic schools; and what steps they are taking to give increased priority to the teaching of climate change in state schools. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Pendry more like this
star this property uin HL15774 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-05-22more like thismore than 2019-05-22
star this property answer text <p>The government has not made any specific assessment of the priority that Catholic schools give to teaching about climate change. Like all schools, faith schools are required to teach a broad and balanced curriculum that includes science.</p><p>The government believes it is vital that all children are informed about climate change. For this reason, relevant topics are included throughout the geography and science national curriculum and qualifications. For example, as part of the science curriculum in secondary schools, pupils will consider the evidence for human causes of climate change. In addition, as part of GCSE geography they will study the spatial and temporal characteristics of climatic change and evidence for different causes, including human activity.</p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-22T14:25:35.203Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-22T14:25:35.203Z
star this property answering member
4689
star this property label Biography information for Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property tabling member
457
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Pendry more like this
1127240
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-16more like thismore than 2019-05-16
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Arts: Vocational Education more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that businesses continue to have access to a workforce with sufficient creative and design-linked skills. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Blackstone more like this
star this property uin HL15793 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-05-22more like thismore than 2019-05-22
star this property answer text <p>Our reforms to professional and technical education and apprenticeships are aimed at ensuring that people of all ages get access to the education and training that businesses across the sectors need.</p><p> </p><p>Both apprenticeships and T levels, when they are introduced, can be a valuable way of developing skills for the creative and design sectors.</p><p> </p><p>Employer-designed T levels will give students the skills needed to enter work or higher level technical study, helping young people to get a head-start in their potential careers. The first 3 T levels will be delivered in 2020, and we will confirm the timetable for the rollout of courses in creative and design before the end of this year.</p><p> </p><p>New apprenticeship standards across all levels are being designed and driven by industry – creating higher quality training that will lead to a more skilled and productive economy. There are 23 Creative and Design Apprenticeship Standards approved for delivery with 6 standards currently in development.</p><p> </p><p>The National College for Creative Industries, opened in September 2016, is one of 4 national colleges which we are establishing to set new standards for higher-level technical training.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-22T15:40:22.273Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-22T15:40:22.273Z
star this property answering member
4689
star this property label Biography information for Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property tabling member
3561
unstar this property label Biography information for Baroness Blackstone more like this
1126325
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-13more like thismore than 2019-05-13
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Special Educational Needs: Finance more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what action they intend to take, if any, in the next Spending Review to ensure that councils can continue to meet their statutory duties towards those with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Porter of Spalding more like this
star this property uin HL15685 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-05-23more like thismore than 2019-05-23
star this property answer text <p>We recognise that high needs budgets are under pressure and that is why we allocated an additional £250 million in high needs funding for 2018-19 and 2019-20 in December. This brings the total allocation for high needs this year to £6.3 billion.</p><p>My right hon. Friend, the Chancellor of the Exchequer has announced that the government will hold a Spending Review alongside the Budget where spending plans beyond 2019-20 will be agreed. The government will need to balance competing priorities across a broad range of areas, but we will be taking careful account of the importance of providing the right funding for education, and for high needs in particular. My right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education has made clear that as we approach the next Spending Review, he will back head teachers to ensure they have the resources they need to deliver a world class education.</p><p> </p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-23T11:34:51.837Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-23T11:34:51.837Z
star this property answering member
4689
star this property label Biography information for Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property tabling member
4555
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Porter of Spalding more like this
1126911
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-15more like thismore than 2019-05-15
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Children: Social Services more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department has made of the financial sustainability of local government children’s services. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Knowsley more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Mr George Howarth more like this
star this property uin 254748 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-05-23more like thismore than 2019-05-23
star this property answer text <p>Funding for children’s services is made available through the Local Government Finance Settlement. We are in the final year of a multi-year settlement deal and have made £46.4 billion available this year for local services including those for children’s services. The government has also made £410 million available to local authorities this year specifically for adult and children social care.</p><p>My department is working with the sector, the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government and with HM Treasury, as part of our preparation for the next Spending Review, to understand the level of funding local government needs to meet demand and deliver statutory duties.</p><p> </p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Stratford-on-Avon more like this
star this property answering member printed Nadhim Zahawi more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-23T09:57:46.1Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-23T09:57:46.1Z
star this property answering member
4113
star this property label Biography information for Nadhim Zahawi more like this
star this property tabling member
481
unstar this property label Biography information for Sir George Howarth more like this
1127172
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-16more like thismore than 2019-05-16
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Schools: Notice Boards more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will reclassify school notice boards as wall linings in his review of fire safety in schools. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Newport West more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Ruth Jones more like this
star this property uin 255400 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-05-23more like thismore than 2019-05-23
star this property answer text <p>Schools must be safe places in which to study and to work. The Department intends to set a clear standard that is practical and achievable as well as easily understood.</p><p>The Department, as part of the regular review of its standards for school buildings, has completed research into the flammability of notice boards used in schools.</p><p>The outcome of this work is currently being used to clarify the specification the Department uses in relation to noticeboards in new school buildings and will also be included in an updated version of Building Bulletin 100 (Fire Safety) which is currently under review.</p><p>The classification of materials used in construction is controlled by Building Regulations which are a matter for the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Bognor Regis and Littlehampton more like this
star this property answering member printed Nick Gibb more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-23T14:15:26.773Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-23T14:15:26.773Z
star this property answering member
111
star this property label Biography information for Nick Gibb more like this
star this property tabling member
4716
unstar this property label Biography information for Ruth Jones more like this
1127199
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-16more like thismore than 2019-05-16
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Higher Education: Registration more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the (a) average length of time and (b) longest time was for a higher education establishment to receive their registration from the Office for Students. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Burton more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Andrew Griffiths more like this
star this property uin 255319 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-05-23more like thismore than 2019-05-23
star this property answer text <p>There is no meaningful average time for higher education establishments receiving an outcome on their Office for Students (OfS) registration application. This is because the time taken from initial receipt of the application to a final registration decision is dependent on a number of factors. These factors include the completeness of the application initially submitted, the scale of the clarificatory information requested by the assessor during the assessment process and the length of time taken by the provider to respond to such information requests. In addition, other factors include the time taken for the provider’s access and participation plan to be negotiated and approved, the likelihood of the provider to breach its ongoing conditions of registration, including the ways in which that would impact its students. Furthermore, consideration is also given to the overall readiness of the provider to be regulated.</p><p> </p><p>In cases where decisions that have been reached more quickly often relate to circumstances where the provider has submitted a near-complete application or where queries during the assessment have been minimal. In addition, more timely decisions can be made where the risk assessment suggests that the provider is unlikely to breach any of its ongoing conditions of registration. Cases that have taken longer to assess have typically involved several attempts to obtain relevant information from the provider. The risk assessment also suggests either that the provider does not satisfy one or more initial conditions of registration (in which case the provider may make representations against the proposed decision to refuse registration), or that the provider may be at increased risk of breaching one or more of its ongoing conditions of registration once registered. In these cases, the OfS is likely to conclude that the interests of students are best protected by taking regulatory action with which the provider must comply, such as applying specific conditions of registration or enhanced monitoring arrangements. Such occurrences would lengthen the timeframe for a decision on an application.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency Kingswood more like this
star this property answering member printed Chris Skidmore more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-23T10:03:45.947Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-23T10:03:45.947Z
star this property answering member
4021
star this property label Biography information for Chris Skidmore more like this
star this property tabling member
3936
unstar this property label Biography information for Andrew Griffiths more like this