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1126721
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-14more like thismore than 2019-05-14
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
unstar this property hansard heading History: Curriculum more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the merits of revising the history curriculum to provide an honest and critical portrayal of the UK’s colonial history. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Pendry more like this
star this property uin HL15738 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
star this property answer text <p>The current national curriculum programmes of study for history, which have been taught since September 2014, set the framework for the teaching of the subject in maintained schools in terms of the broad time periods and themes to be taught. Academies may design and follow their own curricula.</p><p> </p><p>The government does not specify what the content of lessons on particular topics should be or how teachers should present information. We trust teachers, as professionals, to plan their own lessons and select their own resources.</p><p> </p><p>However, the curriculum does aim to make sure that pupils know and understand how Britain has influenced and been influenced by the wider world. Therefore, Empire and colonialism is a significant theme, and a suggested topic within the ‘challenges for Britain, Europe and the wider world 1901 to the present day’ theme is ‘Indian independence and end of Empire’.</p><p> </p><p>Programmes of study also require at least one study of a significant society or issue in world history and its interconnections with other world developments. While not mandatory, a suggested topic is ‘China’s Qing dynasty 1644-1911’, which encompasses the period within which the Opium Wars took place.</p><p> </p><p>The national curriculum programmes of study for history for key stages 1-3 are attached and are available here: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculum-in-england-history-programmes-of-study" target="_blank">www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculum-in-england-history-programmes-of-study</a>.</p><p> </p><p>We have no current plans to change the history curriculum. In order to provide a period of stability to schools, my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education has committed to making no new changes to the national curriculum during this Parliament.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property attachment
1
star this property file name HL15739_HL15738_KS1_KS2_national_curriculum_history.pdf more like this
star this property title HL15739_HL15738_PDF more like this
2
star this property file name HL15739_HL15738_KS3_national_curriculum_history.pdf more like this
star this property title HL15739_HL15738_PDF more like this
star this property grouped question UIN HL15739 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-22T14:28:16.707Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-22T14:28:16.707Z
star this property answering member
4689
star this property label Biography information for Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property tabling member
457
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Pendry more like this
1126722
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-14more like thismore than 2019-05-14
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
unstar this property hansard heading History: Curriculum more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the merits of including the Opium Wars in the history curriculum in order to facilitate a greater understanding of (1) the UK’s colonial history, and (2) UK–Chinese relations. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Pendry more like this
star this property uin HL15739 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
star this property answer text <p>The current national curriculum programmes of study for history, which have been taught since September 2014, set the framework for the teaching of the subject in maintained schools in terms of the broad time periods and themes to be taught. Academies may design and follow their own curricula.</p><p> </p><p>The government does not specify what the content of lessons on particular topics should be or how teachers should present information. We trust teachers, as professionals, to plan their own lessons and select their own resources.</p><p> </p><p>However, the curriculum does aim to make sure that pupils know and understand how Britain has influenced and been influenced by the wider world. Therefore, Empire and colonialism is a significant theme, and a suggested topic within the ‘challenges for Britain, Europe and the wider world 1901 to the present day’ theme is ‘Indian independence and end of Empire’.</p><p> </p><p>Programmes of study also require at least one study of a significant society or issue in world history and its interconnections with other world developments. While not mandatory, a suggested topic is ‘China’s Qing dynasty 1644-1911’, which encompasses the period within which the Opium Wars took place.</p><p> </p><p>The national curriculum programmes of study for history for key stages 1-3 are attached and are available here: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculum-in-england-history-programmes-of-study" target="_blank">www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculum-in-england-history-programmes-of-study</a>.</p><p> </p><p>We have no current plans to change the history curriculum. In order to provide a period of stability to schools, my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education has committed to making no new changes to the national curriculum during this Parliament.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property attachment
1
star this property file name HL15739_HL15738_KS1_KS2_national_curriculum_history.pdf more like this
star this property title HL15739_HL15738_PDF more like this
2
star this property file name HL15739_HL15738_KS3_national_curriculum_history.pdf more like this
star this property title HL15739_HL15738_PDF more like this
star this property grouped question UIN HL15738 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-22T14:28:16.657Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-22T14:28:16.657Z
star this property answering member
4689
star this property label Biography information for Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property tabling member
457
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Pendry more like this
1126720
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-14more like thismore than 2019-05-14
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
unstar this property hansard heading School Day more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government, following the report by the UCL Institute of Education School break times and young people’s social lives: A follow-up national study, published in May, what assessment they have made of the impact of shortening school break times on (1) childhood obesity, (2) academic performance, and (3) children’s social lives; and what steps they are taking to address any such impact. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Pendry more like this
star this property uin HL15737 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
star this property answer text <p>The government has not made a specific assessment of the impact of the length of school break times on obesity, academic performance or children’s social lives. Schools have the autonomy to make decisions about the structure and duration of their school day to suit their own circumstances. However, the department is clear that pupils should be given an appropriate break and expects school leaders to make sure this happens.</p><p> </p><p>The government recognises the importance of physical activity in schools to improve physical and mental wellbeing and support attainment. That is why our Childhood Obesity strategy reflects the Chief Medical Officer’s guidelines that primary age children should get at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity a day and the aim that 30 minutes of that should be during the school day.</p><p> </p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-22T15:39:32.723Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-22T15:39:32.723Z
star this property answering member
4689
star this property label Biography information for Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property tabling member
457
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Pendry more like this
1127013
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-15more like thismore than 2019-05-15
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Climate Change: Education more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government, following the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of England and Wales in 2002 and Pope Francis’ encyclical on climate change Laudato Si: On Care for Our Common Home, published in 2015, what assessment they have made of the priority that teaching on climate change has been given in Catholic schools; and what steps they are taking to give increased priority to the teaching of climate change in state schools. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Pendry more like this
star this property uin HL15774 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
star this property answer text <p>The government has not made any specific assessment of the priority that Catholic schools give to teaching about climate change. Like all schools, faith schools are required to teach a broad and balanced curriculum that includes science.</p><p>The government believes it is vital that all children are informed about climate change. For this reason, relevant topics are included throughout the geography and science national curriculum and qualifications. For example, as part of the science curriculum in secondary schools, pupils will consider the evidence for human causes of climate change. In addition, as part of GCSE geography they will study the spatial and temporal characteristics of climatic change and evidence for different causes, including human activity.</p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-22T14:25:35.203Zmore like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering member
4689
star this property label Biography information for Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property tabling member
457
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Pendry more like this
1127240
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-16more like thismore than 2019-05-16
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Arts: Vocational Education more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that businesses continue to have access to a workforce with sufficient creative and design-linked skills. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Blackstone more like this
star this property uin HL15793 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
star this property answer text <p>Our reforms to professional and technical education and apprenticeships are aimed at ensuring that people of all ages get access to the education and training that businesses across the sectors need.</p><p> </p><p>Both apprenticeships and T levels, when they are introduced, can be a valuable way of developing skills for the creative and design sectors.</p><p> </p><p>Employer-designed T levels will give students the skills needed to enter work or higher level technical study, helping young people to get a head-start in their potential careers. The first 3 T levels will be delivered in 2020, and we will confirm the timetable for the rollout of courses in creative and design before the end of this year.</p><p> </p><p>New apprenticeship standards across all levels are being designed and driven by industry – creating higher quality training that will lead to a more skilled and productive economy. There are 23 Creative and Design Apprenticeship Standards approved for delivery with 6 standards currently in development.</p><p> </p><p>The National College for Creative Industries, opened in September 2016, is one of 4 national colleges which we are establishing to set new standards for higher-level technical training.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-22T15:40:22.273Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-22T15:40:22.273Z
star this property answering member
4689
star this property label Biography information for Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property tabling member
3561
unstar this property label Biography information for Baroness Blackstone more like this