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1126720
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-14more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
unstar this property hansard heading School Day more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government, following the report by the UCL Institute of Education School break times and young people’s social lives: A follow-up national study, published in May, what assessment they have made of the impact of shortening school break times on (1) childhood obesity, (2) academic performance, and (3) children’s social lives; and what steps they are taking to address any such impact. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Pendry more like this
star this property uin HL15737 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
star this property answer text <p>The government has not made a specific assessment of the impact of the length of school break times on obesity, academic performance or children’s social lives. Schools have the autonomy to make decisions about the structure and duration of their school day to suit their own circumstances. However, the department is clear that pupils should be given an appropriate break and expects school leaders to make sure this happens.</p><p> </p><p>The government recognises the importance of physical activity in schools to improve physical and mental wellbeing and support attainment. That is why our Childhood Obesity strategy reflects the Chief Medical Officer’s guidelines that primary age children should get at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity a day and the aim that 30 minutes of that should be during the school day.</p><p> </p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-22T15:39:32.723Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-22T15:39:32.723Z
star this property answering member
4689
star this property label Biography information for Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property tabling member
457
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Pendry more like this
1126721
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-14more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
unstar this property hansard heading History: Curriculum more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the merits of revising the history curriculum to provide an honest and critical portrayal of the UK’s colonial history. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Pendry more like this
star this property uin HL15738 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
star this property answer text <p>The current national curriculum programmes of study for history, which have been taught since September 2014, set the framework for the teaching of the subject in maintained schools in terms of the broad time periods and themes to be taught. Academies may design and follow their own curricula.</p><p> </p><p>The government does not specify what the content of lessons on particular topics should be or how teachers should present information. We trust teachers, as professionals, to plan their own lessons and select their own resources.</p><p> </p><p>However, the curriculum does aim to make sure that pupils know and understand how Britain has influenced and been influenced by the wider world. Therefore, Empire and colonialism is a significant theme, and a suggested topic within the ‘challenges for Britain, Europe and the wider world 1901 to the present day’ theme is ‘Indian independence and end of Empire’.</p><p> </p><p>Programmes of study also require at least one study of a significant society or issue in world history and its interconnections with other world developments. While not mandatory, a suggested topic is ‘China’s Qing dynasty 1644-1911’, which encompasses the period within which the Opium Wars took place.</p><p> </p><p>The national curriculum programmes of study for history for key stages 1-3 are attached and are available here: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculum-in-england-history-programmes-of-study" target="_blank">www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculum-in-england-history-programmes-of-study</a>.</p><p> </p><p>We have no current plans to change the history curriculum. In order to provide a period of stability to schools, my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education has committed to making no new changes to the national curriculum during this Parliament.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property attachment
1
star this property file name HL15739_HL15738_KS1_KS2_national_curriculum_history.pdf more like this
star this property title HL15739_HL15738_PDF more like this
2
star this property file name HL15739_HL15738_KS3_national_curriculum_history.pdf more like this
star this property title HL15739_HL15738_PDF more like this
star this property grouped question UIN HL15739 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-22T14:28:16.707Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-22T14:28:16.707Z
star this property answering member
4689
star this property label Biography information for Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property tabling member
457
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Pendry more like this
1126722
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-14more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
unstar this property hansard heading History: Curriculum more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the merits of including the Opium Wars in the history curriculum in order to facilitate a greater understanding of (1) the UK’s colonial history, and (2) UK–Chinese relations. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Pendry more like this
star this property uin HL15739 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
star this property answer text <p>The current national curriculum programmes of study for history, which have been taught since September 2014, set the framework for the teaching of the subject in maintained schools in terms of the broad time periods and themes to be taught. Academies may design and follow their own curricula.</p><p> </p><p>The government does not specify what the content of lessons on particular topics should be or how teachers should present information. We trust teachers, as professionals, to plan their own lessons and select their own resources.</p><p> </p><p>However, the curriculum does aim to make sure that pupils know and understand how Britain has influenced and been influenced by the wider world. Therefore, Empire and colonialism is a significant theme, and a suggested topic within the ‘challenges for Britain, Europe and the wider world 1901 to the present day’ theme is ‘Indian independence and end of Empire’.</p><p> </p><p>Programmes of study also require at least one study of a significant society or issue in world history and its interconnections with other world developments. While not mandatory, a suggested topic is ‘China’s Qing dynasty 1644-1911’, which encompasses the period within which the Opium Wars took place.</p><p> </p><p>The national curriculum programmes of study for history for key stages 1-3 are attached and are available here: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculum-in-england-history-programmes-of-study" target="_blank">www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculum-in-england-history-programmes-of-study</a>.</p><p> </p><p>We have no current plans to change the history curriculum. In order to provide a period of stability to schools, my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education has committed to making no new changes to the national curriculum during this Parliament.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property attachment
1
star this property file name HL15739_HL15738_KS1_KS2_national_curriculum_history.pdf more like this
star this property title HL15739_HL15738_PDF more like this
2
star this property file name HL15739_HL15738_KS3_national_curriculum_history.pdf more like this
star this property title HL15739_HL15738_PDF more like this
star this property grouped question UIN HL15738 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-22T14:28:16.657Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-22T14:28:16.657Z
star this property answering member
4689
star this property label Biography information for Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property tabling member
457
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Pendry more like this
1127013
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-15more like thismore than 2019-05-15
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Climate Change: Education more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government, following the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of England and Wales in 2002 and Pope Francis’ encyclical on climate change Laudato Si: On Care for Our Common Home, published in 2015, what assessment they have made of the priority that teaching on climate change has been given in Catholic schools; and what steps they are taking to give increased priority to the teaching of climate change in state schools. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Pendry more like this
star this property uin HL15774 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
star this property answer text <p>The government has not made any specific assessment of the priority that Catholic schools give to teaching about climate change. Like all schools, faith schools are required to teach a broad and balanced curriculum that includes science.</p><p>The government believes it is vital that all children are informed about climate change. For this reason, relevant topics are included throughout the geography and science national curriculum and qualifications. For example, as part of the science curriculum in secondary schools, pupils will consider the evidence for human causes of climate change. In addition, as part of GCSE geography they will study the spatial and temporal characteristics of climatic change and evidence for different causes, including human activity.</p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-22T14:25:35.203Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-22T14:25:35.203Z
star this property answering member
4689
star this property label Biography information for Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property tabling member
457
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Pendry more like this
1127240
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-16more like thismore than 2019-05-16
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Arts: Vocational Education more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that businesses continue to have access to a workforce with sufficient creative and design-linked skills. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Blackstone more like this
star this property uin HL15793 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
star this property answer text <p>Our reforms to professional and technical education and apprenticeships are aimed at ensuring that people of all ages get access to the education and training that businesses across the sectors need.</p><p> </p><p>Both apprenticeships and T levels, when they are introduced, can be a valuable way of developing skills for the creative and design sectors.</p><p> </p><p>Employer-designed T levels will give students the skills needed to enter work or higher level technical study, helping young people to get a head-start in their potential careers. The first 3 T levels will be delivered in 2020, and we will confirm the timetable for the rollout of courses in creative and design before the end of this year.</p><p> </p><p>New apprenticeship standards across all levels are being designed and driven by industry – creating higher quality training that will lead to a more skilled and productive economy. There are 23 Creative and Design Apprenticeship Standards approved for delivery with 6 standards currently in development.</p><p> </p><p>The National College for Creative Industries, opened in September 2016, is one of 4 national colleges which we are establishing to set new standards for higher-level technical training.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-22T15:40:22.273Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-22T15:40:22.273Z
star this property answering member
4689
star this property label Biography information for Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property tabling member
3561
unstar this property label Biography information for Baroness Blackstone more like this
1127226
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-16more like thismore than 2019-05-16
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Pupils: Health more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care on (a) creating a body image and media literacy toolkit and (b) making it a compulsory element of the school curriculum. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Newcastle-under-Lyme more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Paul Farrelly more like this
star this property uin 255300 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
star this property answer text <p>The Government is committed to an ambitious programme of activity to support good physical and mental health in children and young people. The Department for Education is working closely with the Department for Health and Social Care to provide support for schools so that they can promote good physical and mental wellbeing amongst their pupils.</p><p> </p><p>As part of this, the Government is making the teaching of health education compulsory in all state-funded schools from September 2020. Relationships education will be taught in all primary schools and relationships and sex education in all secondary schools. Schools are being encouraged and supported to start teaching these new subjects from September 2019.</p><p> </p><p>The statutory guidance for the new subjects sets out that pupils should be taught about the similarities and differences between the online world and the physical world. This should cover the impact of unhealthy or obsessive comparison with others online including through setting unrealistic expectations for body image and how people may curate a specific image of their life online.</p><p>The Department is also producing supporting information for schools on how to teach about issues related to internet safety across the curriculum. This will cover information about the types of harms that young people could face online, including the impact that internet content can have on body confidence, along with guidance about teaching children how to assess critically what they encounter online.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency Bognor Regis and Littlehampton more like this
star this property answering member printed Nick Gibb more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-22T12:51:27.797Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-22T12:51:27.797Z
star this property answering member
111
star this property label Biography information for Nick Gibb more like this
star this property tabling member
1436
unstar this property label Biography information for Paul Farrelly more like this
1127282
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-17more like thismore than 2019-05-17
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Pupil Exclusions more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Ofsted report entitled, Exploring the issue of off-rolling published on 10 May 2019, what steps he is taking to reduce the number of pupils illegitimately removed from schools. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Coventry South more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Mr Jim Cunningham more like this
star this property uin 255650 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
star this property answer text <p>The Department is clear that off-rolling, as defined by Ofsted, is unacceptable, and whilst the Department believes this practice is relatively rare, the Government is committed to continue working with Ofsted to tackle the practice of off-rolling.</p><p>Pupils leave school rolls for many reasons, including permanent exclusion, moving to another school, or changes of circumstances (such as when a pupil moves to a new area). All schools must notify the local authority when a pupil’s name is to be deleted from the admission register. There is no legal definition of ‘off-rolling’. However, the law is clear that a pupil’s name can only be deleted from the admission register on the grounds prescribed in regulation 8 of the Education (Pupil Registration) (England) Regulations 2006, as amended.</p><p>Following media coverage of off-rolling in 2017, the Department wrote to all secondary schools, reminding them of the rules surrounding exclusion.</p><p>Ofsted already considers records of children taken off roll and has also recently consulted on proposals that will see a strengthened focus on this issue. From September 2019 where inspectors find off-rolling, this will always be addressed in the inspection report, and where appropriate will lead to a school’s leadership being judged inadequate.</p><p>In March 2018, the Government launched an externally-led review of exclusions practice, led by Edward Timpson CBE. The review explored how head teachers use exclusion, and why pupils with particular characteristics are more likely to be excluded from school. It also considered the differences in exclusion rates across primary and secondary schools in England.</p><p>The Timpson Review and the Government’s response were published on 7 May. The review makes 30 recommendations and highlights variation in exclusions practice across different schools, local authorities and certain groups of children. The Government has accepted all 30 recommendations in principle, and the Department has committed to working with education leaders over the summer to design a consultation on making schools accountable for the outcomes for permanently excluded children, to be launched in the autumn. As part of this, the Department will seek views on how to mitigate the potential unintended consequences Edward Timpson has identified in his review, including the practice of off-rolling.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Bognor Regis and Littlehampton more like this
star this property answering member printed Nick Gibb more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-22T10:57:23.337Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-22T10:57:23.337Z
star this property answering member
111
star this property label Biography information for Nick Gibb more like this
star this property tabling member
308
unstar this property label Biography information for Mr Jim Cunningham more like this
1126589
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-14more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Students: Finance more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether the review of post-18 education and funding will assess the way in which the student finance system is communicated to (a) current and (b) prospective (i) students, (ii) graduates, (iii) parents and (iv) others. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Bexleyheath and Crayford more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Sir David Evennett more like this
star this property uin 254159 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
star this property answer text <p>The government’s review of post-18 education and funding is looking at how the government and institutions communicate with students and graduates, as well as parents and others, around student finance. This review looks to ensure this communication is as clear as possible (consistent with the relevant legal requirements) about the nature and terms of student support.</p><p> </p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Kingswood more like this
star this property answering member printed Chris Skidmore more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-22T11:19:01.863Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-22T11:19:01.863Z
star this property answering member
4021
star this property label Biography information for Chris Skidmore more like this
star this property tabling member
1198
unstar this property label Biography information for Sir David Evennett more like this
1126590
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-14more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Students: Finance more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether the review of post-18 education and funding is planned to report before the parliamentary summer recess. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Bexleyheath and Crayford more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Sir David Evennett more like this
star this property uin 254160 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
star this property answer text <p>The independent panel will report shortly. The government will then conclude the overall review later this year.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Kingswood more like this
star this property answering member printed Chris Skidmore more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-22T11:21:00.457Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-22T11:21:00.457Z
star this property answering member
4021
star this property label Biography information for Chris Skidmore more like this
star this property tabling member
1198
unstar this property label Biography information for Sir David Evennett more like this
1126505
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-14more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education remove filter
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Academies: Autism more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions (a) he (b) Ministers in his Department and (c) officials in his Department have had with AET on the benchmarking exercise for AET secondary schools in London; and whether his Department approved benchmarking process; and if he will place in the Library a copy of the benchmark against which AET secondary schools in London are being assessed. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Manchester Central more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lucy Powell more like this
star this property uin 254192 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
star this property answer text <p>The department, including ministers and officials, have held no detailed discussions with the Academies Enterprise Trust on a benchmarking exercise for their London Academies. We have not approved a benchmarking process, as this is for the trust to determine, and do not have a copy of any benchmark London Academies are currently being assessed against.</p><p>The department does publish a range of financial benchmarking tools, and signposts trusts to these. They include the Schools Financial Benchmarking tool which can be accessed publicly here: <a href="https://schools-financial-benchmarking.service.gov.uk/" target="_blank">https://schools-financial-benchmarking.service.gov.uk/</a>.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Stratford-on-Avon more like this
star this property answering member printed Nadhim Zahawi more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-22T11:24:25.157Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-22T11:24:25.157Z
star this property answering member
4113
star this property label Biography information for Nadhim Zahawi more like this
star this property previous answer version
119073
star this property answering member constituency Stratford-on-Avon more like this
star this property answering member printed Nadhim Zahawi more like this
star this property answering member
4113
star this property label Biography information for Nadhim Zahawi more like this
star this property tabling member
4263
unstar this property label Biography information for Lucy Powell more like this