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41576
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-03-05more like thismore than 2014-03-05
star this property answering body
Home Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 1 more like this
star this property answering dept short name
unstar this property answering dept sort name
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the current timescale for the introduction of the e-borders programme is; and when she intends to announce a preferred bidder for this programme. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Shipley remove filter
star this property tabling member printed
Philip Davies more like this
star this property uin 190589 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
star this property answer text <p> </p><p> </p><p>The activity of the eBorders programme has been absorbed into the Border Systems Programme. <br><br>By the end of this Parliament the Border Systems Programme aims to:<br><br>• Complete resilience of all current business critical systems; <br>• Develop replacement primary border security systems; <br>• Provide the capability to support commitments on exit checks; <br>• Establish a programme for the next generation of Radiological and Nuclear detection (Cyclamen); <br>• Continue the implementation of second generation e-Gates across the estate; <br>• Develop and implement new freight targeting capability for Sea Containers; <br>• Establish contracts to purchase new detection equipment; <br>• Continue to assure live operations of existing systems.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Old Bexley and Sidcup more like this
star this property answering member printed James Brokenshire more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-04-07T12:00:00.00Zmore like thismore than 2014-04-07T12:00:00.00Z
star this property answering member
1530
star this property label Biography information for James Brokenshire more like this
unstar this property tabling member
1565
unstar this property label Biography information for Philip Davies more like this
45929
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-03-31more like thismore than 2014-03-31
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
unstar this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will publish his Department's equality impact assessment of its policy on uniforms for male and female prisoners. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Shipley remove filter
star this property tabling member printed
Philip Davies more like this
star this property uin 194430 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
star this property answer text <p /> <p>The requirement for prisoners to wear uniform is set out in the Incentives and Earned Privileges national policy framework, Prison Service Instruction 30/2013. During the review of this policy in 2013 an Equality Impact Assessment was completed and I have placed a copy in the Libraries of both Houses.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Kenilworth and Southam more like this
star this property answering member printed Jeremy Wright more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-04-07T12:00:00.00Zmore like thismore than 2014-04-07T12:00:00.00Z
star this property answering member
1560
star this property label Biography information for Jeremy Wright more like this
unstar this property tabling member
1565
unstar this property label Biography information for Philip Davies more like this
45934
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-03-31more like thismore than 2014-03-31
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
unstar this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people have been given more than one life sentence on separate sentencing occasions in the last 10 years; and what the offences were for which they received those life sentences. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Shipley remove filter
star this property tabling member printed
Philip Davies more like this
star this property uin 194380 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
star this property answer text <p /> <p /> <p>A life sentence is mandatory for murder and discretionary life sentences are available to Judges for other very serious offences. This Government has introduced an automatic life sentence for a second very serious violent or sexual offence.</p><p> </p><p>Under a life sentence, the court determines the minimum period to be served in prison for the purposes of punishment and deterrence. Once that period has been served it is for the Parole Board to determine if and when the offender may be released from prison on life licence and subject to recall for the rest of their life.</p><p> </p><p>Table 1 shows the number of offenders who have been sentenced to life in the 12 months ending September 2013 who previously had one or more previous life sentence on a separate sentencing occasion within the last 10 years, in England and Wales. The table also shows details of their latest and previous offences for which they received a life sentence.</p><p> </p><p>The number of offenders who receive a second life sentence is small. A number of life sentence prisoners commit offences in prison which result in a second life sentence. Some life sentence prisoners can also receive a second life sentence on conviction for offences committed prior to being imprisoned (e.g. a previous murder or rape). Only one of the offenders shown in Table 1 had been released from prison on life licence when he committed a further offence which resulted in a second life sentence.</p><p> </p><p>The figures provided have been drawn from an extract of the Police National Computer (PNC) data held by the Department. The PNC holds details of all convictions and cautions given for recordable offences committed in England and Wales. In addition, as with any large scale recording system the PNC is subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Kenilworth and Southam more like this
star this property answering member printed Jeremy Wright more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-04-07T12:00:00.00Zmore like thismore than 2014-04-07T12:00:00.00Z
star this property answering member
1560
star this property label Biography information for Jeremy Wright more like this
unstar this property tabling member
1565
unstar this property label Biography information for Philip Davies more like this
45938
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-03-31more like thismore than 2014-03-31
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
unstar this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the ratio of prison officers to inmates by gender was in each (a) prison establishment and (b) category of prison in England and Wales in each of the last five years. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Shipley remove filter
star this property tabling member printed
Philip Davies more like this
star this property uin 194419 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
star this property answer text <p> </p><p> </p><p>Information on the ratio of prisoners to prison officers has been provided previously to the hon. Member for Tooting, Sadiq Khan. I refer the hon. Member to the reply given on 4 Mar 2014, Official Report, Column 805W.</p><p> </p><p>It is not possible to calculate a meaningful ratio of prisoners to staff based on gender. Any officer to prisoner ratio must take account of all available staffing, of either gender, in order to realistically represent the level of staffing.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Kenilworth and Southam more like this
star this property answering member printed Jeremy Wright more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-04-07T12:00:00.00Zmore like thismore than 2014-04-07T12:00:00.00Z
star this property answering member
1560
star this property label Biography information for Jeremy Wright more like this
unstar this property tabling member
1565
unstar this property label Biography information for Philip Davies more like this
46142
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-03-31more like thismore than 2014-03-31
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
unstar this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisoners who are in open prisons are serving (a) a life sentence and (b) an indeterminate sentence for public protection. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Shipley remove filter
star this property tabling member printed
Philip Davies more like this
star this property uin 194415 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
star this property answer text <p> </p><p>Depending on the length of tariff and the risk they pose, indeterminate sentenced prisoners (ISPs – both those serving life and Imprisonment for Public Protection sentences) move through their sentence via a series of progressive transfers into lower security establishments in the closed estate and then usually into open conditions. The purpose of any placement in open conditions is for such prisoners' risks to be tested in less stringent conditions in order to inform the Parole Board's consideration as to whether it is safe to release them into the community. It is also is an important part of the offender's rehabilitation. The decision to transfer ISPs to open conditions is a categorisation decision which is a matter for the Secretary of State. The Secretary of State may take this decision after seeking advice from the Parole Board or executively where the prisoners may demonstrate exceptional progress.</p><p> </p><p>However, there is nothing automatic about progress from open conditions to eventual release. Rather, the period in open prison will serve as an important time to test the prisoner and will help inform the Parole Board's decision whether the offenders risk is such that it may be safely managed in the community.</p><p> </p><p>For many prisoners, in particular those such as ISPs who have spent a considerable amount of time in custody; these are essential components for successful reintegration in the community and therefore an important factor in protecting the public. To release these prisoners directly from a closed prison without the resettlement benefits of the open estate would undoubtedly lead to higher levels of post-release re-offending.</p><p> </p><p>The main purpose of open conditions is to test prisoners in conditions more similar to those that they will face in the community. It also enables them to develop their plans for eventual release. Time spent in open prisons affords prisoners the opportunity to find work, re-establish family ties, reintegrate into the community and ensure housing needs are met. Open prisons are the most effective means of ensuring that prisoners are subject to testing, with appropriate risk assessment to ensure the protection of the public, before they are released into the community. Once tariff has expired, an ISP's continued detention is justified only so long as it is necessary for the protection of the public.</p><p> </p><p>Public protection is the priority and the Board will take into account a range of factors when assessing whether an offender's risk is reduced sufficiently, in order that they can be managed in open conditions or on licence in the community. These might include the completion of offence related courses, a sustained period of good custodial behaviour, access to appropriate and stable accommodation, access to education, training and employment, and support from professionals as well as family and friends. The Parole Board would not recommend a prisoner's transfer to open conditions unless they considered it safe to do so. Prisoners located in open prison conditions have been rigorously risk assessed and categorised as being of a low enough risk to the public to warrant their placement in an open prison.</p><p>The requested information is provided in the table attached.</p><p /> <p>These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.</p><p /> <p> </p><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency Kenilworth and Southam more like this
star this property answering member printed Jeremy Wright more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-04-07T12:00:00.00Zmore like thismore than 2014-04-07T12:00:00.00Z
star this property answering member
1560
star this property label Biography information for Jeremy Wright more like this
unstar this property attachment
1
star this property file name 194415 - Table.doc more like this
star this property title Table more like this
unstar this property tabling member
1565
unstar this property label Biography information for Philip Davies more like this
46318
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-04-01more like thismore than 2014-04-01
star this property answering body
Department for International Development more like this
star this property answering dept id 20 more like this
star this property answering dept short name International Development more like this
unstar this property answering dept sort name International Development more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what measures are in place to ensure that aid given to foreign countries is used for the purposes intended; and what proportion of such aid not being used for those purposes would result in future aid being denied to that country. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Shipley remove filter
star this property tabling member printed
Philip Davies more like this
star this property uin 194676 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
star this property answer text <p>DFID has a number of controls in place focussing on monitoring and evaluation, including both internal and external audits and reports from the International Development Committee and the Independent Commission for Aid Impact.</p><p>DFID has strong internal review processes in place to make sure projects are properly monitored and closed if they are not delivering good results and value for money.</p><p> </p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Putney more like this
star this property answering member printed Justine Greening more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-04-07T12:00:00.00Zmore like thismore than 2014-04-07T12:00:00.00Z
star this property answering member
1555
star this property label Biography information for Justine Greening more like this
unstar this property tabling member
1565
unstar this property label Biography information for Philip Davies more like this