Linked Data API

Show Search Form

Search Results

1135182
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-27more like thismore than 2019-06-27
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property hansard heading Genetics: Screening more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, which diagnostic tests will whole genome sequencing replace, particularly for blood cancers. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Sheffield South East remove filter
star this property tabling member printed
Mr Clive Betts more like this
star this property uin 270281 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false remove filter
star this property date of answer less than 2019-07-05more like thismore than 2019-07-05
star this property answer text <p>During 2019, the National Health Service will begin to offer whole genome sequencing (WGS) as part of clinical care for:</p><p>- Seriously ill children likely to have a rare genetic disorder;</p><p>- People with one of 21 rare conditions where current evidence supports early adoption of WGS as a diagnostic test; and</p><p>- People with specific types of cancer for which there is likely to be the greatest patient benefit from using WGS – children with cancer, sarcoma and acute myeloid leukaemia.</p><p> </p><p>WGS will only replace existing diagnostic tests once the testing is demonstrated to be clinically safe to replace existing diagnostic testing. Initially, existing diagnostic testing will continue to be performed alongside WGS testing where clinically appropriate. This will continue until WGS is able to fully support clinical decision making within clinically appropriate timescales.</p><p>Current testing for blood cancers includes a number of diagnostic tests, the current expectation is that WGS will not be used to replace tests that require very fast turnaround times (under 24 hours) or high sensitivity.</p><p>WGS and non-WGS testing that will be available as part of clinical care is outlined in the National Genomic Test Directory at the following link:</p><p> </p><p><a href="https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/national-genomic-test-directories/" target="_blank">https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/national-genomic-test-directories/</a></p><p> </p><p>The UK Genetic Testing Network (UKGTN) published the NHS Directory of Genetic Disorders/Genes for Diagnostic Testing, which evaluated and recommended genetic tests for rare and inherited disorders for the National Health Service across the UK. However, there was not an equivalent for cancer genomic testing. The National Genomic Test Directory specifies which genomic tests are commissioned by the NHS in England, the technology by which they are available, and the patients who will be eligible to access to a test.</p><p>The National Genomic Test Directory will be updated on an annual basis and NHS England will implement a clear and transparent process, supported by a Clinical and Scientific Expert Panel, to determine which tests are available within the NHS. This will include reviewing any tests that may be retired or replaced by more modern technology, such as WGS. As the price of WGS falls and the clinical evidence improves, we envisage that it will be extended to more conditions and therefore more patients.</p><p> </p><p><strong> </strong></p><p><strong> </strong></p>
unstar this property answering member constituency Gosport more like this
star this property answering member printed Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
270282 more like this
270283 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-07-05T09:24:02.73Zmore like thismore than 2019-07-05T09:24:02.73Z
star this property answering member
4008
star this property label Biography information for Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property tabling member
394
star this property label Biography information for Mr Clive Betts more like this
1135183
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-27more like thismore than 2019-06-27
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property hansard heading Genetics: Screening more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the National Genomic Test Directory directly replaces the NHS Directory of Genetic Disorders/Genes for Diagnostic Testing. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Sheffield South East remove filter
star this property tabling member printed
Mr Clive Betts more like this
star this property uin 270282 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false remove filter
star this property date of answer less than 2019-07-05more like thismore than 2019-07-05
star this property answer text <p>During 2019, the National Health Service will begin to offer whole genome sequencing (WGS) as part of clinical care for:</p><p>- Seriously ill children likely to have a rare genetic disorder;</p><p>- People with one of 21 rare conditions where current evidence supports early adoption of WGS as a diagnostic test; and</p><p>- People with specific types of cancer for which there is likely to be the greatest patient benefit from using WGS – children with cancer, sarcoma and acute myeloid leukaemia.</p><p> </p><p>WGS will only replace existing diagnostic tests once the testing is demonstrated to be clinically safe to replace existing diagnostic testing. Initially, existing diagnostic testing will continue to be performed alongside WGS testing where clinically appropriate. This will continue until WGS is able to fully support clinical decision making within clinically appropriate timescales.</p><p>Current testing for blood cancers includes a number of diagnostic tests, the current expectation is that WGS will not be used to replace tests that require very fast turnaround times (under 24 hours) or high sensitivity.</p><p>WGS and non-WGS testing that will be available as part of clinical care is outlined in the National Genomic Test Directory at the following link:</p><p> </p><p><a href="https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/national-genomic-test-directories/" target="_blank">https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/national-genomic-test-directories/</a></p><p> </p><p>The UK Genetic Testing Network (UKGTN) published the NHS Directory of Genetic Disorders/Genes for Diagnostic Testing, which evaluated and recommended genetic tests for rare and inherited disorders for the National Health Service across the UK. However, there was not an equivalent for cancer genomic testing. The National Genomic Test Directory specifies which genomic tests are commissioned by the NHS in England, the technology by which they are available, and the patients who will be eligible to access to a test.</p><p>The National Genomic Test Directory will be updated on an annual basis and NHS England will implement a clear and transparent process, supported by a Clinical and Scientific Expert Panel, to determine which tests are available within the NHS. This will include reviewing any tests that may be retired or replaced by more modern technology, such as WGS. As the price of WGS falls and the clinical evidence improves, we envisage that it will be extended to more conditions and therefore more patients.</p><p> </p><p><strong> </strong></p><p><strong> </strong></p>
unstar this property answering member constituency Gosport more like this
star this property answering member printed Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
270281 more like this
270283 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-07-05T09:24:02.807Zmore like thismore than 2019-07-05T09:24:02.807Z
star this property answering member
4008
star this property label Biography information for Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property tabling member
394
star this property label Biography information for Mr Clive Betts more like this
1135184
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-27more like thismore than 2019-06-27
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property hansard heading Genetics: Screening more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how will new tests be added to the National Genomic Test Directory. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Sheffield South East remove filter
star this property tabling member printed
Mr Clive Betts more like this
star this property uin 270283 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false remove filter
star this property date of answer less than 2019-07-05more like thismore than 2019-07-05
star this property answer text <p>During 2019, the National Health Service will begin to offer whole genome sequencing (WGS) as part of clinical care for:</p><p>- Seriously ill children likely to have a rare genetic disorder;</p><p>- People with one of 21 rare conditions where current evidence supports early adoption of WGS as a diagnostic test; and</p><p>- People with specific types of cancer for which there is likely to be the greatest patient benefit from using WGS – children with cancer, sarcoma and acute myeloid leukaemia.</p><p> </p><p>WGS will only replace existing diagnostic tests once the testing is demonstrated to be clinically safe to replace existing diagnostic testing. Initially, existing diagnostic testing will continue to be performed alongside WGS testing where clinically appropriate. This will continue until WGS is able to fully support clinical decision making within clinically appropriate timescales.</p><p>Current testing for blood cancers includes a number of diagnostic tests, the current expectation is that WGS will not be used to replace tests that require very fast turnaround times (under 24 hours) or high sensitivity.</p><p>WGS and non-WGS testing that will be available as part of clinical care is outlined in the National Genomic Test Directory at the following link:</p><p> </p><p><a href="https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/national-genomic-test-directories/" target="_blank">https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/national-genomic-test-directories/</a></p><p> </p><p>The UK Genetic Testing Network (UKGTN) published the NHS Directory of Genetic Disorders/Genes for Diagnostic Testing, which evaluated and recommended genetic tests for rare and inherited disorders for the National Health Service across the UK. However, there was not an equivalent for cancer genomic testing. The National Genomic Test Directory specifies which genomic tests are commissioned by the NHS in England, the technology by which they are available, and the patients who will be eligible to access to a test.</p><p>The National Genomic Test Directory will be updated on an annual basis and NHS England will implement a clear and transparent process, supported by a Clinical and Scientific Expert Panel, to determine which tests are available within the NHS. This will include reviewing any tests that may be retired or replaced by more modern technology, such as WGS. As the price of WGS falls and the clinical evidence improves, we envisage that it will be extended to more conditions and therefore more patients.</p><p> </p><p><strong> </strong></p><p><strong> </strong></p>
unstar this property answering member constituency Gosport more like this
star this property answering member printed Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
270281 more like this
270282 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-07-05T09:24:02.857Zmore like thismore than 2019-07-05T09:24:02.857Z
star this property answering member
4008
star this property label Biography information for Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property tabling member
394
star this property label Biography information for Mr Clive Betts more like this
1132282
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-14more like thismore than 2019-06-14
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property hansard heading Genetics: Screening more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of patients that will benefit from whole genome sequencing in the first year of its introduction; and what steps is he taking to ensure the adequacy of trained professionals to provide that service. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Sheffield South East remove filter
star this property tabling member printed
Mr Clive Betts more like this
star this property uin 264725 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false remove filter
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-19more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answer text <p>As part of the NHS Long Term Plan, the National Health Service has committed to sequencing 500,000 whole genomes by 2023/24.</p><p>During 2019, the NHS will begin to offer whole genome sequencing (WGS) as part of clinical care for:</p><p>- Seriously ill children likely to have a rare genetic disorder;</p><p>- People with one of 21 rare conditions where current evidence supports early adoption of WGS as a diagnostic test;</p><p>- People with specific types of cancer for which there is likely to be the greatest patient benefit from using WGS – children with cancer, sarcoma and Acute Myeloid Leukaemia.</p><p> </p><p>As the price of whole genome sequencing falls and the evidence improves, we envisage that it will be extended to more conditions and therefore more patients.</p> more like this
unstar this property answering member constituency Gosport more like this
star this property answering member printed Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-19T16:17:13.117Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-19T16:17:13.117Z
star this property answering member
4008
star this property label Biography information for Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property tabling member
394
star this property label Biography information for Mr Clive Betts more like this