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418744
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-09-14more like thismore than 2015-09-14
answering body
Prime Minister more like this
answering dept id 23 more like this
answering dept short name Prime Minister more like this
answering dept sort name Prime Minister more like this
hansard heading Members: Surveillance more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Prime Minister, pursuant to the Answer of 11 September 2015 to Question 8501, whether the Wilson Doctrine applies in the same way to Members of the Scottish Parliament as it applies to hon. Members and Members of the House of Lords. more like this
tabling member constituency Edinburgh South remove filter
tabling member printed
Ian Murray more like this
uin 10138 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-09-17more like thismore than 2015-09-17
answer text <p>I have nothing further to add to my response to the hon. Member of 11 September 2015, UIN <a href="http://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-question/Commons/2015-09-04/8501/" target="_blank">8501</a>.</p> more like this
answering member constituency Witney more like this
answering member printed Mr David Cameron more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-09-17T12:47:49.167Zmore like thismore than 2015-09-17T12:47:49.167Z
answering member
1467
label Biography information for Mr David Cameron more like this
tabling member
3966
label Biography information for Ian Murray more like this
418650
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-09-14more like thismore than 2015-09-14
answering body
HM Treasury more like this
answering dept id 14 more like this
answering dept short name Treasury more like this
answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
hansard heading Devolution: Finance more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much Barnett consequential funding the Government has provided to each of the devolved administrations as a result of changes in funding provided to the Department for Transport in each year since 2010-11 to date; and with which programmes such changes in funding were associated. more like this
tabling member constituency Edinburgh South remove filter
tabling member printed
Ian Murray more like this
uin 10192 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-09-17more like thismore than 2015-09-17
answer text <p>As the Barnett Formula is applied at a departmental level at Spending Reviews, it is not possible to disaggregate the application of the Barnett Formula to changes in individual programmes in the Department for Transport’s funding at either Spending Review 2010 or Spending Round 2013.</p><p> </p><p> </p> more like this
answering member constituency Chelsea and Fulham more like this
answering member printed Greg Hands more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-09-17T15:07:16.597Zmore like thismore than 2015-09-17T15:07:16.597Z
answering member
1526
label Biography information for Greg Hands more like this
tabling member
3966
label Biography information for Ian Murray more like this
732503
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2017-06-26more like thismore than 2017-06-26
answering body
HM Treasury more like this
answering dept id 14 more like this
answering dept short name Treasury more like this
answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
hansard heading European Investment Bank more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will take steps to ensure that Scotland remains eligible for, and retains access to, European Investment Bank funding after the UK leaves the EU. more like this
tabling member constituency Edinburgh South remove filter
tabling member printed
Ian Murray more like this
uin 1041 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2017-06-29more like thismore than 2017-06-29
answer text <p>The future relationship between the UK and the EIB is something that will be determined as part of the negotiations on the UK’s exit from the EU and the Government will not be giving a running commentary on these negotiations.</p><p> </p><p>The EIB publishes details of all their projects on their website. Financing details of all projects, including those in Scotland, for each of the past 10 years can be found in the link below</p><p> </p><p><a href="http://www.eib.org/projects/loan/list/?region=1&amp;country=GB" target="_blank">http://www.eib.org/projects/loan/list/?region=1&amp;country=GB</a></p><p> </p><p>As part of the ongoing work on the UKs exit from the EU, HMT has been assessing the contribution EIB finance makes to the UK economy. In his Mansion House speech on 20 June, the Chancellor said that; “The European Investment Bank, and its offshoot, the European Investment Fund, have been an important source of funding for infrastructure investment and for growth businesses.”</p>
answering member constituency South West Norfolk more like this
answering member printed Elizabeth Truss more like this
question first answered
less than 2017-06-29T07:35:38.837Zmore like thismore than 2017-06-29T07:35:38.837Z
answering member
4097
label Biography information for Elizabeth Truss more like this
tabling member
3966
label Biography information for Ian Murray more like this
420349
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-10-09more like thismore than 2015-10-09
answering body
HM Treasury more like this
answering dept id 14 more like this
answering dept short name Treasury more like this
answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
hansard heading Child Tax Credit more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, for what reasons his Department has not published a distributional analysis showing the effect on families of the reduction of the higher income threshold for child tax credit from £16,105 to £12,125. more like this
tabling member constituency Edinburgh South remove filter
tabling member printed
Ian Murray more like this
uin 10781 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-10-20more like thismore than 2015-10-20
answer text <p>The Summer Budget offered a new deal for working people. It means Britain moving from a high welfare, high tax, low wage economy to a lower welfare, lower tax, higher wage society.</p><br /><p>A new National Living Wage for workers aged 25 and above, initially set at £7.20 per hour from April 2016, will directly benefit 2.7 million low wage workers, and up to 6 million could see a pay rise as a result of a ripple effect up the earnings distribution. The new National Living Wage will boost pay for those currently earning the National Minimum Wage by £4,800 a year by 2020 when the National Living Wage is expected to rise to over £9 per hour.</p><br /><p>To help working families keep more of what they earn, the personal allowance will increase to £11,000 in 2016-17 and £11,200 in 2017-18. The government has committed to increase the personal allowance to £12,500 by 2020 which will mean that a typical basic rate taxpayer will see their income tax cut by £1,205 a year compared to 2010.</p><br /><p>The government set out its assessment of the impacts of the Summer Budget policies in the Welfare Reform and Work Bill on 20<sup>th</sup> July 2015. Taken together, the introduction of the National Living Wage, increases in the personal allowance and welfare changes mean that 8 out of 10 working households will be better off as a result of the Summer Budget.</p><br /><p>In response to a request from the Secondary Legislation Scrutiny Committee, the government has chosen to produce and release an impact assessment on the tax credit changes to the Committee. The impact assessment shows that 60% of the tax credit savings come from the half of tax credit claimants with the highest income.</p>
answering member constituency East Hampshire more like this
answering member printed Damian Hinds more like this
grouped question UIN
10782 more like this
10783 more like this
10784 more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-10-20T11:19:13.22Zmore like thismore than 2015-10-20T11:19:13.22Z
answering member
3969
label Biography information for Mr Damian Hinds more like this
tabling member
3966
label Biography information for Ian Murray more like this
420350
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-10-09more like thismore than 2015-10-09
answering body
HM Treasury more like this
answering dept id 14 more like this
answering dept short name Treasury more like this
answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
hansard heading Child Tax Credit more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, if his Department will publish a distributional analysis showing the effect on families in (a) Scotland and (b) the UK of the reduction of the higher income threshold for child tax credit from £16,105 to £12,125. more like this
tabling member constituency Edinburgh South remove filter
tabling member printed
Ian Murray more like this
uin 10782 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-10-20more like thismore than 2015-10-20
answer text <p>The Summer Budget offered a new deal for working people. It means Britain moving from a high welfare, high tax, low wage economy to a lower welfare, lower tax, higher wage society.</p><br /><p>A new National Living Wage for workers aged 25 and above, initially set at £7.20 per hour from April 2016, will directly benefit 2.7 million low wage workers, and up to 6 million could see a pay rise as a result of a ripple effect up the earnings distribution. The new National Living Wage will boost pay for those currently earning the National Minimum Wage by £4,800 a year by 2020 when the National Living Wage is expected to rise to over £9 per hour.</p><br /><p>To help working families keep more of what they earn, the personal allowance will increase to £11,000 in 2016-17 and £11,200 in 2017-18. The government has committed to increase the personal allowance to £12,500 by 2020 which will mean that a typical basic rate taxpayer will see their income tax cut by £1,205 a year compared to 2010.</p><br /><p>The government set out its assessment of the impacts of the Summer Budget policies in the Welfare Reform and Work Bill on 20<sup>th</sup> July 2015. Taken together, the introduction of the National Living Wage, increases in the personal allowance and welfare changes mean that 8 out of 10 working households will be better off as a result of the Summer Budget.</p><br /><p>In response to a request from the Secondary Legislation Scrutiny Committee, the government has chosen to produce and release an impact assessment on the tax credit changes to the Committee. The impact assessment shows that 60% of the tax credit savings come from the half of tax credit claimants with the highest income.</p>
answering member constituency East Hampshire more like this
answering member printed Damian Hinds more like this
grouped question UIN
10781 more like this
10783 more like this
10784 more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-10-20T11:19:13.297Zmore like thismore than 2015-10-20T11:19:13.297Z
answering member
3969
label Biography information for Mr Damian Hinds more like this
tabling member
3966
label Biography information for Ian Murray more like this
420351
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-10-09more like thismore than 2015-10-09
answering body
HM Treasury more like this
answering dept id 14 more like this
answering dept short name Treasury more like this
answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
hansard heading Tax Credits (Income Thresholds and Determination of Rates) (Amendment) Regulations 2015 more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, for what reasons his Department has not undertaken and published an impact assessment for the Tax Credits (Income Thresholds and Determination of Rates) (Amendment) Regulations 2015. more like this
tabling member constituency Edinburgh South remove filter
tabling member printed
Ian Murray more like this
uin 10783 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-10-20more like thismore than 2015-10-20
answer text <p>The Summer Budget offered a new deal for working people. It means Britain moving from a high welfare, high tax, low wage economy to a lower welfare, lower tax, higher wage society.</p><br /><p>A new National Living Wage for workers aged 25 and above, initially set at £7.20 per hour from April 2016, will directly benefit 2.7 million low wage workers, and up to 6 million could see a pay rise as a result of a ripple effect up the earnings distribution. The new National Living Wage will boost pay for those currently earning the National Minimum Wage by £4,800 a year by 2020 when the National Living Wage is expected to rise to over £9 per hour.</p><br /><p>To help working families keep more of what they earn, the personal allowance will increase to £11,000 in 2016-17 and £11,200 in 2017-18. The government has committed to increase the personal allowance to £12,500 by 2020 which will mean that a typical basic rate taxpayer will see their income tax cut by £1,205 a year compared to 2010.</p><br /><p>The government set out its assessment of the impacts of the Summer Budget policies in the Welfare Reform and Work Bill on 20<sup>th</sup> July 2015. Taken together, the introduction of the National Living Wage, increases in the personal allowance and welfare changes mean that 8 out of 10 working households will be better off as a result of the Summer Budget.</p><br /><p>In response to a request from the Secondary Legislation Scrutiny Committee, the government has chosen to produce and release an impact assessment on the tax credit changes to the Committee. The impact assessment shows that 60% of the tax credit savings come from the half of tax credit claimants with the highest income.</p>
answering member constituency East Hampshire more like this
answering member printed Damian Hinds more like this
grouped question UIN
10781 more like this
10782 more like this
10784 more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-10-20T11:19:13.37Zmore like thismore than 2015-10-20T11:19:13.37Z
answering member
3969
label Biography information for Mr Damian Hinds more like this
tabling member
3966
label Biography information for Ian Murray more like this
420352
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-10-09more like thismore than 2015-10-09
answering body
HM Treasury more like this
answering dept id 14 more like this
answering dept short name Treasury more like this
answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
hansard heading Tax Credits (Income Thresholds and Determination of Rates) (Amendment) Regulations 2015 more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will undertake and publish an impact assessment in (a) Scotland and (b) the UK for the Tax Credits (Income Thresholds and Determination of Rates) (Amendment) Regulations 2015. more like this
tabling member constituency Edinburgh South remove filter
tabling member printed
Ian Murray more like this
uin 10784 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-10-20more like thismore than 2015-10-20
answer text <p>The Summer Budget offered a new deal for working people. It means Britain moving from a high welfare, high tax, low wage economy to a lower welfare, lower tax, higher wage society.</p><br /><p>A new National Living Wage for workers aged 25 and above, initially set at £7.20 per hour from April 2016, will directly benefit 2.7 million low wage workers, and up to 6 million could see a pay rise as a result of a ripple effect up the earnings distribution. The new National Living Wage will boost pay for those currently earning the National Minimum Wage by £4,800 a year by 2020 when the National Living Wage is expected to rise to over £9 per hour.</p><br /><p>To help working families keep more of what they earn, the personal allowance will increase to £11,000 in 2016-17 and £11,200 in 2017-18. The government has committed to increase the personal allowance to £12,500 by 2020 which will mean that a typical basic rate taxpayer will see their income tax cut by £1,205 a year compared to 2010.</p><br /><p>The government set out its assessment of the impacts of the Summer Budget policies in the Welfare Reform and Work Bill on 20<sup>th</sup> July 2015. Taken together, the introduction of the National Living Wage, increases in the personal allowance and welfare changes mean that 8 out of 10 working households will be better off as a result of the Summer Budget.</p><br /><p>In response to a request from the Secondary Legislation Scrutiny Committee, the government has chosen to produce and release an impact assessment on the tax credit changes to the Committee. The impact assessment shows that 60% of the tax credit savings come from the half of tax credit claimants with the highest income.</p>
answering member constituency East Hampshire more like this
answering member printed Damian Hinds more like this
grouped question UIN
10781 more like this
10782 more like this
10783 more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-10-20T11:19:13.127Zmore like thismore than 2015-10-20T11:19:13.127Z
answering member
3969
label Biography information for Mr Damian Hinds more like this
tabling member
3966
label Biography information for Ian Murray more like this
419850
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-10-09more like thismore than 2015-10-09
answering body
HM Treasury more like this
answering dept id 14 more like this
answering dept short name Treasury more like this
answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
hansard heading Income Tax: Scotland more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, when HM Revenue and Customs will send a notification letter to Scottish taxpayers to inform them of the introduction of the new Scottish rate of income tax. more like this
tabling member constituency Edinburgh South remove filter
tabling member printed
Ian Murray more like this
uin 10830 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-10-19more like thismore than 2015-10-19
answer text <p>HM Revenue and Customs plans to send a notification letter to Scottish taxpayers in December of this year, informing them of the introduction of the new Scottish Rate of Income Tax. As the Scottish Government is yet to set a date for the announcement of its intended rate, it is not possible to state whether the letters will be sent before or after the rate has been announced.</p> more like this
answering member constituency South West Hertfordshire more like this
answering member printed Mr David Gauke more like this
grouped question UIN 10833 more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-10-19T15:22:34.43Zmore like thismore than 2015-10-19T15:22:34.43Z
answering member
1529
label Biography information for Mr David Gauke more like this
tabling member
3966
label Biography information for Ian Murray more like this
419851
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-10-09more like thismore than 2015-10-09
answering body
HM Treasury more like this
answering dept id 14 more like this
answering dept short name Treasury more like this
answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
hansard heading Income Tax: Scotland more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will send detailed information to employers and payroll agents affected by the introduction of the new Scottish rate of income tax to enable them to implement systems and deal with enquiries. more like this
tabling member constituency Edinburgh South remove filter
tabling member printed
Ian Murray more like this
uin 10831 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-10-19more like thismore than 2015-10-19
answer text <p>HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) have been liaising with employers and payroll software developers for the last eighteen months to raise their awareness of the Scottish Rate of Income Tax. This has been undertaken through numerous workshops, presentations and publications.HMRC have already published:</p><br /><ul><li>a technical pack (in Dec 2014) outlining the Specified Electronic Submission files for outgoing messages (P6/P9) for 2016/17 <br></li><li>technical specifications for the Specified Electronic Submission for incoming files (FPS/EPS), as well as guidance &amp; test data (June 2015)<p>In addition, test services for the 2016/17 tax year went live on 8 October 2015, enabling payroll developers to submit their test files to HMRC.</p><p>HMRC have also included details of the Scottish Rate in their Employer Bulletin publication, which will assist employers in dealing with queries from their employees, and published guidance on GOV.UK.</li></ul> more like this
answering member constituency South West Hertfordshire more like this
answering member printed Mr David Gauke more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-10-19T15:29:48.393Zmore like thismore than 2015-10-19T15:29:48.393Z
answering member
1529
label Biography information for Mr David Gauke more like this
tabling member
3966
label Biography information for Ian Murray more like this
419852
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-10-09more like thismore than 2015-10-09
answering body
HM Treasury more like this
answering dept id 14 more like this
answering dept short name Treasury more like this
answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
hansard heading Income Tax: Scotland more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment HM Revenue and Customs has made of the effect of the new Scottish rate of income tax on remote and mobile workers who are Scottish taxpayers. more like this
tabling member constituency Edinburgh South remove filter
tabling member printed
Ian Murray more like this
uin 10832 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-10-19more like thismore than 2015-10-19
answer text <p>People will pay the Scottish Rate of Income Tax if their main place of residence is in Scotland for most of the year. For the vast majority of taxpayers, even those who work remotely or on a mobile basis, this will be a straight forward test of the location of the home they return to when work has finished. HM Revenue and Customs will publish detailed guidance to help people understand how the rules apply to them.</p> more like this
answering member constituency South West Hertfordshire more like this
answering member printed Mr David Gauke more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-10-19T15:30:42.19Zmore like thismore than 2015-10-19T15:30:42.19Z
answering member
1529
label Biography information for Mr David Gauke more like this
tabling member
3966
label Biography information for Ian Murray more like this