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1140360
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-07-18more like thismore than 2019-07-18
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Education more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
star this property hansard heading Schools: Admissions more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent steps he has taken to widen access to the highest performing schools in England and Wales. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Newcastle-under-Lyme more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Paul Farrelly more like this
star this property uin 278923 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-07-23more like thismore than 2019-07-23
star this property answer text <p>86% of schools in England are good or outstanding.</p><p>The Department has committed £7 billion to create new school places between 2015 and 2021, the vast majority of which are being created in the best existing schools or through good new schools. The Department is on track to create 1 million places this decade, the largest increase in school capacity in at least two generations.</p><p>Of the mainstream free schools approved between 2014 and 2017, 86% have been in areas where there was a need for more school places. 84% of free schools with inspection reports published by the end of May are rated good or outstanding.</p><p> </p><p>98% of grammar schools are also good or outstanding and the Department wants more disadvantaged pupils to be able to access a place at them. That is why it has made £100 million available through the Selective Schools Expansion Fund to create additional places, where needed, in selective schools that commit to a plan to improve access for disadvantaged children. In 2018 the Department announced 16 selective schools to be funded to expand, and it launched a second bidding round in 2019.</p><p>Education is a devolved matter and it is for the Welsh national assembly to decide on education in Wales.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency Bognor Regis and Littlehampton more like this
star this property answering member printed Nick Gibb remove filter
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-07-23T15:45:06.867Zmore like thismore than 2019-07-23T15:45:06.867Z
star this property answering member
111
unstar this property label Biography information for Nick Gibb more like this
star this property tabling member
1436
unstar this property label Biography information for Paul Farrelly more like this
1140916
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-07-22more like thismore than 2019-07-22
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Education more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
star this property hansard heading Pupils: Literacy more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will increase the time available for pupils sitting the Key Stage 2 reading assessment to reflect the increase in the number of words included in that test since 2014. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Washington and Sunderland West more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
star this property uin 280189 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-07-30more like thismore than 2019-07-30
star this property answer text <p>A new curriculum was introduced in 2014. Tests reflecting that curriculum were introduced in 2016. Since then the time allowed for the Key Stage 2 reading assessment has not changed. The test framework for the English reading test places a limit on the number of words that can be included in the texts and this limit has not been breached.</p><p>Assessments go through a rigorous test development process lasting three years. Thorough trialling of the materials, with the texts in the combinations they will appear in a final test, allows test developers to ensure the reading booklets are suitable and that the standard is maintained.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Bognor Regis and Littlehampton more like this
star this property answering member printed Nick Gibb remove filter
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-07-30T15:16:45.977Zmore like thismore than 2019-07-30T15:16:45.977Z
star this property answering member
111
unstar this property label Biography information for Nick Gibb more like this
star this property tabling member
1521
unstar this property label Biography information for Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
1146818
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove maximum value filtermore like thismore than 2019-09-27
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Education more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
star this property hansard heading Free School Meals more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the implications for his Department's policies are of the finding by the Children's Commissioner for England in her report, Growing Up North, published in March 2018, that pupils from London who have had free school meals are twice as likely to go to university than equivalent children in the north. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Houghton and Sunderland South more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Bridget Phillipson more like this
star this property uin 291571 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-10-02more like thismore than 2019-10-02
star this property answer text <p>Against a background of rising standards, disadvantaged pupils in schools are catching up with their peers as since 2011, the attainment gap in England has narrowed by 9.5% at age 16 and 13.2% at age 11. Our reforms and the extra funding provided through the pupil premium have contributed to this success.</p><p>This year, schools in the North of England are receiving £787 million in additional funding through the pupil premium to improve the outcomes of their disadvantaged pupils. The Department has made available a wide range of resources to help schools make the greatest possible impact with their pupil premium grant.</p><p>The Department is investing £72 million in the 12 Opportunity Areas to tackle barriers preventing children and young people from achieving their potential. This is at the heart of our work to learn what works best in areas with entrenched social mobility barriers so we can roll out successful approaches across the country. Five of the areas targeted are in the North of England (Blackpool, Oldham, Bradford, Doncaster, and the North Yorkshire Coast) and in addition we have Opportunity North East. The Department is investing over £70 million to boost educational outcomes in the North, including through the Northern Powerhouse Schools Strategy.</p><p> </p><p>Widening access and participation in higher education (HE) is a priority. Everyone with the ability to succeed in HE should have the opportunity to participate, regardless of their background or where they grew up.</p><p>The Department has made real progress in ensuring universities are open to all. However, we are aware that more needs to be done to ensure that background isn’t a barrier to realising potential in HE.</p><p>In our latest guidance to the Office for Students on access and participation, we asked them to secure greater, faster progress, particularly at the most selective institutions, through Access and Participation Plans. Through these plans, universities set out what activities they intend to take to ensure students from disadvantaged backgrounds or under-represented groups can access, participate, succeed and progress from HE.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Bognor Regis and Littlehampton more like this
star this property answering member printed Nick Gibb remove filter
star this property grouped question UIN 291572 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-10-02T16:04:22.993Zmore like thismore than 2019-10-02T16:04:22.993Z
star this property answering member
111
unstar this property label Biography information for Nick Gibb more like this
star this property tabling member
4046
unstar this property label Biography information for Bridget Phillipson more like this
1146819
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove maximum value filtermore like thismore than 2019-09-27
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Education more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
star this property hansard heading Pupils: Disadvantaged more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the implications for his Department's policies are of the finding by the Northern Powerhouse Project in its 2018 report, Educating the North, that disadvantaged pupils in the north achieve attainment levels 1.3 percentage points less than the national disadvantaged average and 6.5 percentage points less than their disadvantaged peers in London. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Houghton and Sunderland South more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Bridget Phillipson more like this
star this property uin 291572 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-10-02more like thismore than 2019-10-02
star this property answer text <p>Against a background of rising standards, disadvantaged pupils in schools are catching up with their peers as since 2011, the attainment gap in England has narrowed by 9.5% at age 16 and 13.2% at age 11. Our reforms and the extra funding provided through the pupil premium have contributed to this success.</p><p>This year, schools in the North of England are receiving £787 million in additional funding through the pupil premium to improve the outcomes of their disadvantaged pupils. The Department has made available a wide range of resources to help schools make the greatest possible impact with their pupil premium grant.</p><p>The Department is investing £72 million in the 12 Opportunity Areas to tackle barriers preventing children and young people from achieving their potential. This is at the heart of our work to learn what works best in areas with entrenched social mobility barriers so we can roll out successful approaches across the country. Five of the areas targeted are in the North of England (Blackpool, Oldham, Bradford, Doncaster, and the North Yorkshire Coast) and in addition we have Opportunity North East. The Department is investing over £70 million to boost educational outcomes in the North, including through the Northern Powerhouse Schools Strategy.</p><p> </p><p>Widening access and participation in higher education (HE) is a priority. Everyone with the ability to succeed in HE should have the opportunity to participate, regardless of their background or where they grew up.</p><p>The Department has made real progress in ensuring universities are open to all. However, we are aware that more needs to be done to ensure that background isn’t a barrier to realising potential in HE.</p><p>In our latest guidance to the Office for Students on access and participation, we asked them to secure greater, faster progress, particularly at the most selective institutions, through Access and Participation Plans. Through these plans, universities set out what activities they intend to take to ensure students from disadvantaged backgrounds or under-represented groups can access, participate, succeed and progress from HE.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Bognor Regis and Littlehampton more like this
star this property answering member printed Nick Gibb remove filter
star this property grouped question UIN 291571 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-10-02T16:04:23.04Zmore like thismore than 2019-10-02T16:04:23.04Z
star this property answering member
111
unstar this property label Biography information for Nick Gibb more like this
star this property tabling member
4046
unstar this property label Biography information for Bridget Phillipson more like this
1140382
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-07-18more like thismore than 2019-07-18
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Education more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
star this property hansard heading Pupils: Absenteeism more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he has taken to reduce rates of absence among pupils that are (a) eligible free school meals, (b) have special educational needs and (c) are of the Irish Heritage and Gypsy/Roma ethnic groups in each London Borough. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Feltham and Heston more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Seema Malhotra more like this
star this property uin 279037 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-07-24more like thismore than 2019-07-24
star this property answer text <p>All children of compulsory school age, regardless of their circumstances, are entitled to a full-time education which is suitable to their age, ability, aptitude and any special educational needs they may have. All parents have a legal duty to ensure that if their child is of compulsory school age that they receive a full time education, either by attendance at school or otherwise.</p><p>Schools should continually monitor pupils’ absence. If a child’s absence reaches a level of concern, the school should raise this with the parents and the local authority in the best interest of the child’s education. School and local authorities should consider the individual circumstances of each case and take the appropriate course of action to ensure the child receives consistent education. This can include the use a range of parental responsibility measures to provide support or sanctions to parents when their child’s attendance at school becomes a problem.</p><p>Schools also receive pupil premium funding to support pupils who have been registered for free school meals at any point in the last six years, and have the flexibility to use it to improve attendance if this is deemed a priority.</p><p> </p><p>The Department wants all children and young people, regardless of special educational need or disability, to receive the right support to succeed in their education. and as they move into adult life. In 2014, the Department introduced significant reforms to enable schools to put the right support in place for those pupils so that they can attend school.</p><p>The Department has established a new Gypsy, Roma and Traveller (GRT) stakeholder group, chaired by the noble Baroness Whitaker. This group aims to ensure that any efforts to improve the school system take into account GRT pupils’ needs.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Bognor Regis and Littlehampton more like this
star this property answering member printed Nick Gibb remove filter
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-07-24T11:25:01.857Zmore like thismore than 2019-07-24T11:25:01.857Z
star this property answering member
111
unstar this property label Biography information for Nick Gibb more like this
star this property tabling member
4253
unstar this property label Biography information for Seema Malhotra more like this
1142269
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-07-25more like thismore than 2019-07-25
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Education more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
star this property hansard heading School Day more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps the Government is taking to prevent schools from shortening their school day or week unless it is a direct action to support and enhance their pupils’ education. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Denton and Reddish more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Andrew Gwynne more like this
star this property uin 282244 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-09-03more like thismore than 2019-09-03
star this property answer text <p>All schools have the autonomy to decide the structure and duration of their school day, which includes the flexibility to decide when their school day should start and finish. All maintained schools are required to educate pupils for at least 380 sessions each school year. They cannot reduce the length of the school week if this would take the total number of sessions below that. The Department’s guidance on school attendance was updated on 18 July to make clear that the structure of the school day and school week should not be the cause of inconvenience to parents and it is unacceptable for schools to shorten their school day or school week unless it is a direct action to support and enhance their pupils’ education.</p><p>If schools are considering reducing their school week, where it is not directly to support and enhance their pupils’ education, then it is expected they approach either the Department or their local authority before taking such action.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Bognor Regis and Littlehampton more like this
star this property answering member printed Nick Gibb remove filter
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-09-03T08:51:42.15Zmore like thismore than 2019-09-03T08:51:42.15Z
star this property answering member
111
unstar this property label Biography information for Nick Gibb more like this
star this property tabling member
1506
unstar this property label Biography information for Andrew Gwynne more like this
1142155
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-07-25more like thismore than 2019-07-25
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Education more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
star this property hansard heading Religion: Education more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that all schools provide pupils with opportunities to develop specific and age-appropriate knowledge and understanding of religions as part of promoting mutual respect and tolerance of people with different faiths and beliefs; and if he will make a statement. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Wythenshawe and Sale East more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Mike Kane more like this
star this property uin 282361 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-09-03more like thismore than 2019-09-03
star this property answer text <p>All state funded schools are required by legislation or by their funding agreements to teach religious education (RE) to all registered pupils aged 5 to 18 years. Teaching RE is also part of schools’ activity to meet their legal duty to promote young people’s spiritual, moral and cultural development.</p><p>Each area is required to have a locally agreed syllabus for RE that maintained schools without a religious designation must follow. This is monitored by each area’s Standing Advisory Council for RE (SACRE). As part of school inspections from September 2019, as set out in Ofsted’s published School Inspection Handbook, inspectors will take account of the religious education taught as part of assessing the quality of education provided by the school. It is not Ofsted’s role to inspect denominational religious education in faith schools as part of its inspections. This provision is inspected separately under section 48 of the Education Act 2005.</p><p>The requirement for state funded schools to teach RE did not change with the introduction of the English Baccalaureate (EBacc).</p><p>Many schools choose to teach RE in key stage 4 through offering Religious Studies GCSEs, which are not included in the EBacc. Information on entries to the RE GCSE can be found at: <a href="http://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/key-stage-4-and-multi-academy-trust-performance-2018-revised" target="_blank">www.gov.uk/government/statistics/key-stage-4-and-multi-academy-trust-performance-2018-revised</a>.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Bognor Regis and Littlehampton more like this
star this property answering member printed Nick Gibb remove filter
star this property grouped question UIN
282362 more like this
282363 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-09-03T15:59:21.147Zmore like thismore than 2019-09-03T15:59:21.147Z
star this property answering member
111
unstar this property label Biography information for Nick Gibb more like this
star this property tabling member
4316
unstar this property label Biography information for Mike Kane more like this
1142156
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-07-25more like thismore than 2019-07-25
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Education more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
star this property hansard heading Religion: Education more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the EBacc on the opportunity pupils have to study religious education. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Wythenshawe and Sale East more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Mike Kane more like this
star this property uin 282362 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-09-03more like thismore than 2019-09-03
star this property answer text <p>All state funded schools are required by legislation or by their funding agreements to teach religious education (RE) to all registered pupils aged 5 to 18 years. Teaching RE is also part of schools’ activity to meet their legal duty to promote young people’s spiritual, moral and cultural development.</p><p>Each area is required to have a locally agreed syllabus for RE that maintained schools without a religious designation must follow. This is monitored by each area’s Standing Advisory Council for RE (SACRE). As part of school inspections from September 2019, as set out in Ofsted’s published School Inspection Handbook, inspectors will take account of the religious education taught as part of assessing the quality of education provided by the school. It is not Ofsted’s role to inspect denominational religious education in faith schools as part of its inspections. This provision is inspected separately under section 48 of the Education Act 2005.</p><p>The requirement for state funded schools to teach RE did not change with the introduction of the English Baccalaureate (EBacc).</p><p>Many schools choose to teach RE in key stage 4 through offering Religious Studies GCSEs, which are not included in the EBacc. Information on entries to the RE GCSE can be found at: <a href="http://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/key-stage-4-and-multi-academy-trust-performance-2018-revised" target="_blank">www.gov.uk/government/statistics/key-stage-4-and-multi-academy-trust-performance-2018-revised</a>.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Bognor Regis and Littlehampton more like this
star this property answering member printed Nick Gibb remove filter
star this property grouped question UIN
282361 more like this
282363 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-09-03T15:59:21.207Zmore like thismore than 2019-09-03T15:59:21.207Z
star this property answering member
111
unstar this property label Biography information for Nick Gibb more like this
star this property tabling member
4316
unstar this property label Biography information for Mike Kane more like this
1142159
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-07-25more like thismore than 2019-07-25
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Education more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
star this property hansard heading Religion: Education more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to ensure that all state-funded schools are providing an adequate provision of religious education; and if he will make a statement. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Wythenshawe and Sale East more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Mike Kane more like this
star this property uin 282363 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-09-03more like thismore than 2019-09-03
star this property answer text <p>All state funded schools are required by legislation or by their funding agreements to teach religious education (RE) to all registered pupils aged 5 to 18 years. Teaching RE is also part of schools’ activity to meet their legal duty to promote young people’s spiritual, moral and cultural development.</p><p>Each area is required to have a locally agreed syllabus for RE that maintained schools without a religious designation must follow. This is monitored by each area’s Standing Advisory Council for RE (SACRE). As part of school inspections from September 2019, as set out in Ofsted’s published School Inspection Handbook, inspectors will take account of the religious education taught as part of assessing the quality of education provided by the school. It is not Ofsted’s role to inspect denominational religious education in faith schools as part of its inspections. This provision is inspected separately under section 48 of the Education Act 2005.</p><p>The requirement for state funded schools to teach RE did not change with the introduction of the English Baccalaureate (EBacc).</p><p>Many schools choose to teach RE in key stage 4 through offering Religious Studies GCSEs, which are not included in the EBacc. Information on entries to the RE GCSE can be found at: <a href="http://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/key-stage-4-and-multi-academy-trust-performance-2018-revised" target="_blank">www.gov.uk/government/statistics/key-stage-4-and-multi-academy-trust-performance-2018-revised</a>.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Bognor Regis and Littlehampton more like this
star this property answering member printed Nick Gibb remove filter
star this property grouped question UIN
282361 more like this
282362 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-09-03T15:59:21.253Zmore like thismore than 2019-09-03T15:59:21.253Z
star this property answering member
111
unstar this property label Biography information for Nick Gibb more like this
star this property tabling member
4316
unstar this property label Biography information for Mike Kane more like this
1145772
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-09-25more like thismore than 2019-09-25
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Education more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
star this property hansard heading Teachers: Pay more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to his Department's press release dated 2 September 2019 entitled £30,000 starting salaries proposed for teachers, whether the increase in starting salaries will be funded through (a) the National Funding Formula and (b) a separate grant. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Newcastle upon Tyne North more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Catherine McKinnell more like this
star this property uin 290764 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-10-04more like thismore than 2019-10-04
star this property answer text <p>An increase in teachers’ starting salaries to £30,000 by 2022-23, along with increases elsewhere on the rest of the pay framework, will be affordable for schools within the additional funding announced at the Spending Round that will be paid out through the schools National Funding Formula (NFF). This will see an additional £2.6 billion in core schools funding next year, with increases of £4.8 billion and £7.1 billion in 2021-22 and 2022-23 respectively.</p><p>Pay reform is subject to the School Teacher Review Body (STRB) process and recommendations, but the Department’s assessment of affordability will be part of the evidence provided as part of that process.</p><p>Funding to support pay increases relating to the 2018 and 2019 pay awards will continue to be invested in the existing Teachers’ Pay Grant in 2020-21. From 2021-22 the Department intends to include this funding within NFF allocations.</p><p> </p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Bognor Regis and Littlehampton more like this
star this property answering member printed Nick Gibb remove filter
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-10-04T13:57:42.653Zmore like thismore than 2019-10-04T13:57:42.653Z
star this property answering member
111
unstar this property label Biography information for Nick Gibb more like this
star this property tabling member
4125
unstar this property label Biography information for Catherine McKinnell more like this