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1126933
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-15more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading Universal Credit more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what penalties universal credit claimants incur if they are unable to repay their advance within 12 months. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Birmingham, Selly Oak more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Steve McCabe more like this
star this property uin 254729 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-05-24more like thismore than 2019-05-24
star this property answer text <p>Before accepting a Universal Credit Advance the number of monthly repayment instalments is agreed with a claimant, up to a maximum of 12. For a variety of reasons, instalments may not occur consecutively, so claimants do not incur a penalty if it takes them more than 12 calendar months.</p><p> </p><p>The Department has taken a number of steps to ensure that advances meet the needs of claimants and that recovery arrangements are personalised and reasonable. From October 2019 we are reducing the maximum rate of deductions to 30 per cent and from October 2021 we are increasing the maximum recovery period for advances from 12 to 16 months.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Reading West more like this
star this property answering member printed Alok Sharma more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-24T12:02:18.013Zmore like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering member
4014
star this property label Biography information for Alok Sharma more like this
star this property tabling member
298
unstar this property label Biography information for Steve McCabe more like this
1126937
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-15more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading Universal Credit more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 8 May to Question 249846, whether she has made an assessment of the feasibility of a claimant living with a 40 per cent reduction in their universal credit payment; and if she will make a statement. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Birmingham, Selly Oak more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Steve McCabe more like this
star this property uin 254732 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-05-24more like thismore than 2019-05-24
star this property answer text <p>The Department has taken a number of steps to ensure that advances meet the needs of claimants and that recovery arrangements are personalised and reasonable. From October 2019 we are reducing the maximum rate of deductions to 30 per cent of standard allowance and from October 2021 we are increasing the maximum recovery period for advances from 12 to 16 months.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Reading West more like this
star this property answering member printed Alok Sharma more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-24T13:07:43.513Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-24T13:07:43.513Z
star this property answering member
4014
star this property label Biography information for Alok Sharma more like this
star this property tabling member
298
unstar this property label Biography information for Steve McCabe more like this
1126941
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-15more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading Universal Credit more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 5 May 2019 to Question 249847, what assessment of a universal credit claimant’s financial situation is made when calculating what percentage of their payment will be deducted in order to repay an advance. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Birmingham, Selly Oak more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Steve McCabe more like this
star this property uin 254734 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-03more like thismore than 2019-06-03
star this property answer text <p>The maximum amount a claimant can receive as a new claim advance payment is 100 per cent of their total indicative Universal Credit award. The claimant can decide the length of repayment period when they request the advance. This can be up to a maximum 12 months. The rate of repayment is decided by dividing the total advance amount by the agreed repayment period.</p><p>Affordability is managed by ensuring the recovery rate is not more than the equivalent of 40 per cent of the standard allowance and help is available for those struggling to meet the recovery rate once recovery begins. In many cases, because claimants choose to repay advances over many months, advance repayments constitute less than 40% of a standard allowance. In exceptional circumstances, recovery can be deferred for up to 3 months from the start of the recovery period.</p><p>Advances are not loans; they are an interest free advance payment of benefit, available to help people who need immediate financial support, which is then recovered over an agreed period. The Department has taken a number of steps to ensure that advances meet the needs of claimants and that recovery arrangements are personalised and reasonable. From October 2019 we are reducing the maximum rate of deductions to 30 per cent and from October 2021 we are increasing the maximum recovery period for advances from 12 to 16 months.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Reading West more like this
star this property answering member printed Alok Sharma more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-03T13:51:25.467Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-03T13:51:25.467Z
star this property answering member
4014
star this property label Biography information for Alok Sharma more like this
star this property previous answer version
119076
star this property answering member constituency Reading West more like this
star this property answering member printed Alok Sharma more like this
star this property answering member
4014
unstar this property label Biography information for Alok Sharma more like this
star this property tabling member
298
unstar this property label Biography information for Steve McCabe more like this
1127131
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-16more like thismore than 2019-05-16
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading Unemployment Benefits more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether she has made a recent assessment of the potential merits of waiving the recommencement of waiting times for the receipt of out-of-work benefits after the completion of a short-term contract; and if she will make a statement. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Birkenhead more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Frank Field more like this
star this property uin 255281 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-05-24more like thismore than 2019-05-24
star this property answer text <p>Short-term contracts where earnings are above the relevant threshold would lead to the closure of a claim to benefit. Once this short-term contract has ended, Universal Credit can be claimed.</p><p> </p><p>The Universal Credit assessment period and payment structure are fundamental parts of the design. They help reduce welfare dependency by mirroring the world of work, where currently around 70 per cent of tax credit claimants are paid monthly or four weekly.</p><p> </p><p>The assessment period runs for a full calendar month from the date of entitlement and the Universal Credit pay date will be seven calendar days after the end of the initial assessment period. Subsequent pay dates will be the same each month.</p><p> </p><p>It is therefore not possible to award a Universal Credit payment as soon as a claim is made, as the assessment period must run its course before the award of Universal Credit can be calculated.</p><p><strong> </strong></p><p>No claimant has to go five weeks without receiving support, as advances, worth up to 100 per cent of a claimant’s indicative award, are available up front if there is need.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Reading West more like this
star this property answering member printed Alok Sharma more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-24T13:15:20.623Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-24T13:15:20.623Z
star this property answering member
4014
star this property label Biography information for Alok Sharma more like this
star this property tabling member
478
unstar this property label Biography information for Frank Field more like this
1127504
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-20more like thismore than 2019-05-20
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading Social Security Benefits: Disqualification more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of a moratorium on benefit sanctions for (a) low-income and (b) single-unit families during the school summer holidays. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Bermondsey and Old Southwark more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Neil Coyle more like this
star this property uin 256326 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-05-29more like thismore than 2019-05-29
star this property answer text <p>The Department works to design and deliver a compassionate approach that supports claimants on Universal Credit and other benefits.</p><p> </p><p>The Department has not made an assessment of the potential merits of a moratorium on benefit sanctions during the school summer holidays for a) low-income and (b) single-unit families, as we are in the process of reviewing the effect of sanctions on work incentives.</p><p> </p><p>There are a number of measures designed to help the claimant’s financial situation. Hardship payments are available to eligible claimants who will face hardship as a result of a sanction. Additionally, we have recently announced that the length of the maximum single sanction any benefit claimant could face will be reduced from three years to six months.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Reading West more like this
star this property answering member printed Alok Sharma more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-29T11:06:30.33Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-29T11:06:30.33Z
star this property answering member
4014
star this property label Biography information for Alok Sharma more like this
star this property tabling member
4368
unstar this property label Biography information for Neil Coyle more like this
1127548
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-20more like thismore than 2019-05-20
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading Universal Credit more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent assessment she has made of the adequacy of the timeframe for fixing problems with GOV.UK Verify in respect of universal credit claims. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Plymouth, Sutton and Devonport more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Luke Pollard more like this
star this property uin 256351 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-05-29more like thismore than 2019-05-29
star this property answer text <p>Design and delivery of the GOV.UK Verify platform is the responsibility of the Government Digital Service (GDS) and its partners. The Department for Work and Pensions, along with other government departments is a user of this service, and provides feedback to GDS about its operation, recognising that people wanting to claim Universal Credit, or check their State Pension, can choose to use it to confirm their identity. The Department has no access to this information and claimants have direct contact with identity providers (also called ‘certified companies’).</p><p> </p><p>The Department will continue to consider options to provide the easiest and most secure digital services for our claimants.</p><p /><p>There are various ways in which a claimant can verify their identity for Universal Credit purposes: in person using primary and secondary ID verification or; by using biographical questions, for those who do not have identity documents.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Reading West more like this
star this property answering member printed Alok Sharma more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-29T11:54:13.963Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-29T11:54:13.963Z
star this property answering member
4014
star this property label Biography information for Alok Sharma more like this
star this property tabling member
4682
unstar this property label Biography information for Luke Pollard more like this
1127549
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-20more like thismore than 2019-05-20
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading Universal Credit more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will change the rules on universal credit joint applications to enable couples to verify their ID in person at separate times. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Plymouth, Sutton and Devonport more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Luke Pollard more like this
star this property uin 256352 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-05-29more like thismore than 2019-05-29
star this property answer text <p>At present, there are various ways in which a claimant can verify their identity for Universal Credit purposes: online using the gov.uk verify service; in person using primary and secondary ID verification or; by using biographical questions, for those who do not have identity documents.</p><p> </p><p>If an appointment is needed to verify a claimant’s ID in person, both members of a “couple claim” are not required to attend at the same time. The current process is that separate appointments will be arranged for each partner, at a time that is convenient for them.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Reading West more like this
star this property answering member printed Alok Sharma more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-29T12:04:15.817Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-29T12:04:15.817Z
star this property answering member
4014
star this property label Biography information for Alok Sharma more like this
star this property tabling member
4682
unstar this property label Biography information for Luke Pollard more like this
1127562
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-20more like thismore than 2019-05-20
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading Universal Credit: West Midlands more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent assessment she has made of the effect of the introduction of universal credit on trends in the level of household debt in the West Midlands. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Birmingham, Ladywood more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Shabana Mahmood more like this
star this property uin 256280 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-05-29more like thismore than 2019-05-29
star this property answer text <p>We do not hold data on the levels of household debt.</p><p> </p><p>The Government is committed to ensuring that people, especially those who are experiencing financial difficulties, have access to the information and guidance they need to make effective financial decisions throughout their lives.</p><p> </p><p>Once fully rolled out, Universal Credit is forecast to be £2 billion per year more generous than the legacy system it replaces.</p><p> </p><p>The Money and Pension Service has replaced three providers of government-sponsored financial guidance – the Money Advice Service, the Pensions Advisory Service and Pension Wise – which has brought together the provision of debt advice, money guidance and pension guidance for the first time, streamlining the services offered and reducing confusion for members of the public on who they should contact.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Reading West more like this
star this property answering member printed Alok Sharma more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-29T12:05:36.747Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-29T12:05:36.747Z
star this property answering member
4014
star this property label Biography information for Alok Sharma more like this
star this property tabling member
3914
unstar this property label Biography information for Shabana Mahmood more like this
1127662
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-20more like thismore than 2019-05-20
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading Social Security Benefits: Disqualification more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many three year sanctions were issued by her Department to social security benefit recipients in each of the last 10 years. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Vale of Clwyd more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Chris Ruane more like this
star this property uin 256249 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-03more like thismore than 2019-06-03
star this property answer text <p>Information on the number of three years’ sanctions is recorded on our systems and we centrally collate some Management Information. However, the total number cannot be calculated as it is collected across different benefits on different systems and is not centrally collated in a way that allows analysis to be undertaken easily. An extensive interrogation of our systems would be required in order to provide the information requested, which would incur disproportionate cost.</p><p> </p><p>Nevertheless, from the Department’s quarterly sanctions publication, in table 1.7 of the <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/benefit-sanctions-statistics-to-january-2019" target="_blank">supporting data tables</a>, 2,904 individuals have received three (or more) high level JSA sanction failures, from October 2012 to January 2019. It is not possible to readily unpick how many of these were 3 year sanctions (if two high level sanctions received by an individual were more than a year apart then that would mean they would not have been escalated up to a 3 year sanction duration after their 3rd high level failure). The published data on individuals that received a third high level JSA sanction cannot be split by year. This is because the data is not structured in a way to readily analyse this.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Reading West more like this
star this property answering member printed Alok Sharma more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-03T12:46:47.22Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-03T12:46:47.22Z
star this property answering member
4014
star this property label Biography information for Alok Sharma more like this
star this property tabling member
534
unstar this property label Biography information for Chris Ruane more like this
1127966
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-21more like thismore than 2019-05-21
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading Universal Credit more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many and what proportion of universal credit claims that had a deduction applied had (a) up to 20 per cent, (b) between 21 and 30 per cent, (c) between 31 and 40 per cent and (d) more than 41 per cent deducted in the latest period for which data is available. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency High Peak more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Ruth George more like this
star this property uin 257147 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-04more like thismore than 2019-06-04
star this property answer text <p>The Government recognises the importance of safeguarding the welfare of claimants who have incurred debt. Universal Credit already has procedures and regulations in place to protect claimants from excessive deductions. The maximum rate of deductions cannot normally exceed 40 per cent of the Universal Credit standard allowance, and from October 2019 this will be reduced to 30 per cent.</p><p> </p><p>However, last resort deductions can be applied to protect vulnerable claimants from eviction and/or having their fuel supply (gas/electricity) cut off, by providing a last resort repayment method for arrears of these essential services. In these circumstances, when it is considered to be in the best interests of the claimant and their family, deductions may be taken above the 40 per cent limit.</p><p> </p><p>If a claimant is in financial difficulty as a result of the level of deductions being made they can contact the Department to request that a reduction in deductions be considered.</p><p> </p><p>Of all eligible claims to Universal Credit Full Service due a payment in Feb 2019, 57% (840,000 claims) had a deduction.</p><p> </p><p>Of this 840,000 claims with a deduction:</p><p>a) 50% (420,000 claims) had deductions up to 20% of the Standard Allowance (29% of all eligible claims).</p><p>b) 20% (170,000 claims) had deductions between 21% and 30% of the Standard Allowance (12% of all eligible claims).</p><p>c) 28% (238,000 claims) had deductions between 31% and 40% of their Standard Allowance (16% of all eligible claims).</p><p>d) 1% (13,000 claims) had deductions above 40% of their Standard Allowance (1% of all eligible claims).</p><p> </p><p>Notes:</p><p>Claim numbers may not match official statistics caseloads due to small methodological differences.</p><p>Claim numbers are rounded to the nearest 1,000</p><p>When categorising claims into the groups above the figures for the percentage of the Standard Allowance for individual claims have been rounded to the nearest percent.</p><p>Deductions include advance repayments and all other deductions, but exclude sanctions and fraud penalties which are reductions of benefit rather than deductions.</p><p><strong> </strong></p><p />
star this property answering member constituency Reading West more like this
star this property answering member printed Alok Sharma more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-04T15:57:14.557Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-04T15:57:14.557Z
star this property answering member
4014
star this property label Biography information for Alok Sharma more like this
star this property tabling member
4662
unstar this property label Biography information for Ruth George more like this