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unstar this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-10more like thismore than 2019-05-10
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
star this property hansard heading Pupil Exclusions: Ethnic Groups more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment his Department has made of trends in the level of school exclusions for each ethnic group. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Coventry South more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Mr Jim Cunningham more like this
star this property uin 252824 remove filter
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-05-15more like thismore than 2019-05-15
star this property answer text <p>The rate of exclusion varies by pupil ethnicity, with pupils of some ethnic groups more likely to be excluded and others less.[1]</p><p> </p><p>Last March, the Government commissioned Edward Timpson to explore how head teachers use exclusion and why some groups of pupils are more likely to be excluded than others.</p><p> </p><p>New analysis undertaken for the Timpson Review shows that some ethnic groups are more likely to be excluded after controlling for other observable characteristics. For example, after accounting for other factors, Black Caribbean children are around 1.7 times more likely to be permanently excluded compared to White British children, while Mixed White and Black Caribbean children are around 1.6 times more likely, and Indian and Bangladeshi pupils are around half as likely.</p><p> </p><p>Equally, children in some ethnic groups do not appear to be permanently excluded at a different rate from White British pupils, such as Black African children.</p><p> </p><p>The Timpson review, the analysis technical note, and the Government’s response can be found here: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/school-exclusions-review-call-for-evidence" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/school-exclusions-review-call-for-evidence</a>.</p><p> </p><p>[1] <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/permanent-and-fixed-period-exclusions-in-england-2016-to-2017" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/permanent-and-fixed-period-exclusions-in-england-2016-to-2017</a>. National tables, table 8.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Bognor Regis and Littlehampton more like this
star this property answering member printed Nick Gibb more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-15T12:13:50.66Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-15T12:13:50.66Z
star this property answering member
111
star this property label Biography information for Nick Gibb more like this
star this property tabling member
308
star this property label Biography information for Mr Jim Cunningham more like this