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1003633
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2018-11-09more like thismore than 2018-11-09
answering body
Department for Exiting the European Union more like this
answering dept id 203 more like this
answering dept short name Exiting the European Union more like this
answering dept sort name Exiting the European Union more like this
hansard heading Welsh Language more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what discussions he has had with the (a) Secretary of State for Wales, (b) Welsh Government and (c) Welsh Language Commissioner on the potential effect of the UK leaving the EU on (i) Welsh speakers and (ii) Welsh-speaking communities. more like this
tabling member constituency Arfon more like this
tabling member printed
Hywel Williams more like this
uin 189593 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2018-11-20more like thismore than 2018-11-20
answer text <p>As the Prime Minister has made clear, we are committed to securing a deal that works for the whole of the United Kingdom including Welsh-speaking communities. The UK Government has been working closely and effectively with the Welsh Government, the Secretary of State for Wales and Welsh stakeholders on EU Exit to ensure this.</p><p>This includes, for example, the Joint Ministerial Committee on EU Negotiations and the Ministerial Forum on EU Negotiations. The Ministerial Forum recently discussed the UK Government’s proposals for continued cooperation with the EU on culture and education as well as options for continued participation in successor schemes to EU funding programmes, such as Creative Europe, which I understand has played a role in supporting a number of Welsh language projects. We welcomed the Welsh Ministers’ contributions to this discussion.</p><p>While the Welsh language is a devolved matter, we fully recognise its importance as part of the United Kingdom’s rich culture and will continue working with the Welsh Government, the Secretary of State for Wales and Welsh stakeholders to ensure their concerns on this matter are taken into account as we leave the EU.</p><p> </p>
answering member constituency Worcester more like this
answering member printed Mr Robin Walker more like this
grouped question UIN 189595 more like this
question first answered
less than 2018-11-20T16:18:11.807Zmore like thisremove minimum value filter
answering member
4091
label Biography information for Mr Robin Walker more like this
tabling member
1397
label Biography information for Hywel Williams more like this
1003635
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2018-11-09more like thismore than 2018-11-09
answering body
Department for Exiting the European Union more like this
answering dept id 203 more like this
answering dept short name Exiting the European Union more like this
answering dept sort name Exiting the European Union more like this
hansard heading Welsh Language more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what representations he has received from (a) the Secretary of State for Wales, (b) the Welsh Government and (c) the Welsh Language Commissioner on the potential effect of the UK leaving the EU on (i) Welsh speakers and (ii) Welsh-speaking communities. more like this
tabling member constituency Arfon more like this
tabling member printed
Hywel Williams more like this
uin 189595 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2018-11-20more like thismore than 2018-11-20
answer text <p>As the Prime Minister has made clear, we are committed to securing a deal that works for the whole of the United Kingdom including Welsh-speaking communities. The UK Government has been working closely and effectively with the Welsh Government, the Secretary of State for Wales and Welsh stakeholders on EU Exit to ensure this.</p><p>This includes, for example, the Joint Ministerial Committee on EU Negotiations and the Ministerial Forum on EU Negotiations. The Ministerial Forum recently discussed the UK Government’s proposals for continued cooperation with the EU on culture and education as well as options for continued participation in successor schemes to EU funding programmes, such as Creative Europe, which I understand has played a role in supporting a number of Welsh language projects. We welcomed the Welsh Ministers’ contributions to this discussion.</p><p>While the Welsh language is a devolved matter, we fully recognise its importance as part of the United Kingdom’s rich culture and will continue working with the Welsh Government, the Secretary of State for Wales and Welsh stakeholders to ensure their concerns on this matter are taken into account as we leave the EU.</p><p> </p>
answering member constituency Worcester more like this
answering member printed Mr Robin Walker more like this
grouped question UIN 189593 more like this
question first answered
less than 2018-11-20T16:18:11.853Zmore like thismore than 2018-11-20T16:18:11.853Z
answering member
4091
label Biography information for Mr Robin Walker more like this
tabling member
1397
label Biography information for Hywel Williams more like this
1005792
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2018-11-12more like thismore than 2018-11-12
answering body
Department for Exiting the European Union more like this
answering dept id 203 more like this
answering dept short name Exiting the European Union more like this
answering dept sort name Exiting the European Union more like this
hansard heading Disability more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, which groups his Department has consulted to help ensure that the interests of disabled people are safeguarded in the process of the UK leaving the EU. more like this
tabling member constituency East Kilbride, Strathaven and Lesmahagow more like this
tabling member printed
Dr Lisa Cameron more like this
uin 190486 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2018-11-20more like thismore than 2018-11-20
answer text <p>Ministers and officials from DExEU and other Government departments speak regularly to stakeholders from a variety of sectors, including disability groups, voluntary sector organisations, and organisations representing EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU, to understand their concerns and priorities regarding our EU exit. Last year, our former Minister Rt. Hon. Baroness Anelay met with members of the Disability Charities Consortium, which represents eight disability charities.</p><p>It is important to note that all disability protections covered in domestic legislation, namely the Equality Act 2006 and Equality Act 2010 (and equivalent legislation in Northern Ireland) will also continue to apply after exit.</p><p>Part of the design of the Settled Status scheme for EU citizens in the UK has been to meet the needs of this group. On 25 October, the Home Office announced grant funding of up to £9 million for voluntary and community organisations across the UK to provide support to EU citizens who might need additional help when applying for their immigration status through the EU Settlement Scheme. The grant will help these organisations to both inform vulnerable individuals about the need to apply for settled status and support them to complete their applications under the scheme.</p><p> </p><p><strong></strong><br><br></p>
answering member constituency Worcester more like this
answering member printed Mr Robin Walker more like this
question first answered
remove maximum value filtermore like thismore than 2018-11-20T16:48:32.473Z
answering member
4091
label Biography information for Mr Robin Walker more like this
tabling member
4412
label Biography information for Dr Lisa Cameron more like this
1005912
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2018-11-12more like thismore than 2018-11-12
answering body
Department for Education more like this
answering dept id 60 more like this
answering dept short name Education more like this
answering dept sort name Education more like this
hansard heading Education: Hearing Impairment more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to improve the provision of education services to children with a hearing impairment. more like this
tabling member constituency Hendon more like this
tabling member printed
Dr Matthew Offord more like this
uin 190441 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2018-11-20more like thismore than 2018-11-20
answer text <p>I am determined that all children and young people, including those who are deaf or have a hearing impairment, receive the support they need to achieve the success they deserve. I am meeting with the National Deaf Children’s Society in November to find out more about their concerns.</p><p>In April, the Whole School special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) consortium, led by the National Association for Special Educational Needs, were awarded a two-year contract for a new programme of work which will focus on building the skills of teachers working in mainstream and special schools and ensuring the schools’ workforce are equipped to identify and meet their training needs in relation to SEND. The National Sensory Impairment Partnership are part of the consortium.</p><p>Local authorities play a key role in providing support to children and young people with sensory impairment. They are best placed to determine local priorities and make funding decisions in consultation with local people and having regard to the range of statutory responsibilities placed on them. High needs funding, for children and young people with more complex SEND, increased from £5 billion in 2013 to just under £6 billion this year.</p>
answering member constituency Stratford-on-Avon more like this
answering member printed Nadhim Zahawi more like this
question first answered
less than 2018-11-20T16:23:15.123Zmore like thismore than 2018-11-20T16:23:15.123Z
answering member
4113
label Biography information for Nadhim Zahawi more like this
tabling member
4006
label Biography information for Dr Matthew Offord more like this
1002183
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2018-11-05more like thismore than 2018-11-05
answering body
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
answering dept id 201 more like this
answering dept short name Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
answering dept sort name Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
hansard heading Parental Leave more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what information his Department holds on the average amount of parental leave taken by (a) women and (b) men in (i) England, (ii) London and (iii) the London Borough of Lewisham in each of the last five years. more like this
tabling member constituency Lewisham, Deptford more like this
tabling member printed
Vicky Foxcroft more like this
uin 188224 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2018-11-20more like thismore than 2018-11-20
answer text <p>The most recent official data on average length of family-related leave taken by parents is from the Maternity and Paternity Rights Survey in 2009, which collected data from parents of children born in 2008 across Great Britain.</p><p>This shows that in 2008,</p><ul><li>mothers took an average of 39 weeks of maternity leave, up from 32 weeks in 2006.</li><li>amongst fathers who took some paternity leave, 16% took more than two weeks, 50% took two weeks and 34% took less than two weeks of leave.</li></ul><p>This does not contain information on average weeks of unpaid Parental Leave, nor of Shared Parental Leave which was introduced in 2015.</p><p>Information on the amount of leave taken at the regional or local level is not available.</p><p>The full Maternity and Paternity Rights Survey 2009/10 Research Report can be found here:</p><p>https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/214367/rrep777.pdf</p><p>We are currently evaluating the Shared Parental Leave and Pay schemes. As a part of this, we are commissioning a new survey which will provide updated information. Subject to the progress of data collection, we anticipate publishing findings in Summer 2019.</p>
answering member constituency Rochester and Strood more like this
answering member printed Kelly Tolhurst more like this
question first answered
less than 2018-11-20T16:43:25.83Zmore like thismore than 2018-11-20T16:43:25.83Z
answering member
4487
label Biography information for Kelly Tolhurst more like this
tabling member
4491
label Biography information for Vicky Foxcroft more like this
1006209
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2018-11-13more like thismore than 2018-11-13
answering body
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
answering dept id 201 more like this
answering dept short name Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
answering dept sort name Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
hansard heading Minimum Wage: Young People more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment the Government has made of the potential effect on youth employment rates of the increase in the minimum wage to £8.21 per hour. more like this
tabling member constituency Romford more like this
tabling member printed
Andrew Rosindell more like this
uin 190818 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2018-11-20more like thismore than 2018-11-20
answer text <p>The National Living Wage (NLW) is applicable for those aged 25 or older and will increase in April 2019 to £8.21 per hour. This will see a full-time NLW worker’s earnings increase by over £2,750 compared to its introduction</p><p> </p><p>April 2019’s rate increase is following recommendations from the independent and expert Low Pay Commission (LPC). The detailed assessment made by the LPC in reaching this recommended rate will be found in their Autumn 2018 report, which will be published in due course.</p><p> </p><p>Additionally, the Low Pay Commission also provide recommendations on the youth-related National Minimum Wage (NMW) rates. In April 2019, the NMW for 21-24 year olds will rise to £7.70, the 18-20 year olds’ rate will rise to £6.15, the 16-17 year olds’ rate will rise to £4.35 and the Apprentices’ rate will rise to £3.90. The Low Pay Commission is asked to recommend these rates such that they do not damage the employment prospects of younger workers. Indeed, we have seen youth unemployment (16-24 year olds) decrease by 462,000 workers since 2010.</p>
answering member constituency Rochester and Strood more like this
answering member printed Kelly Tolhurst more like this
question first answered
less than 2018-11-20T16:42:18.957Zmore like thismore than 2018-11-20T16:42:18.957Z
answering member
4487
label Biography information for Kelly Tolhurst more like this
tabling member
1447
label Biography information for Andrew Rosindell more like this
1007135
registered interest true more like this
date remove maximum value filtermore like thismore than 2018-11-14
answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept id 29 more like this
answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
hansard heading Zero Hours Contracts: Young People more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to her Department's press release entitled Youth unemployment down 50% since 2010, published on gov.uk on 16 October 2018, what proportion of recorded employment was under a zero-hours contract. more like this
tabling member constituency Barnsley Central more like this
tabling member printed
Dan Jarvis more like this
uin 191422 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2018-11-20more like thismore than 2018-11-20
answer text <p>The Office for National Statistics (ONS) use the Labour Force Survey (LFS) to provide estimates for the number of people employed on zero hours’ contracts.</p><p> </p><p>The ONS figures for people in employment on zero hours’ contracts broken down by age, do not go back to 2010 and are only currently available up to April-June 2018. Therefore no directly comparable figures to the youth unemployment statistics cited are available.</p><p> </p><p>The majority of young people are not employed on zero hours’ contracts. In 2018 (Apr-Jun) there were 261,000 16-24 year olds on a zero hours’ contracts – representing only 6.9% of employed 16-24 year olds.</p><p> </p><p>This is down from 299,000 young people (7.8% of employed young people) in 2017 (Apr-Jun), but a slight increase from the first comparable data available, which shows in 2014 (Apr-Jun) there were 235,000 young people on a zero hours’ contract (or 6.3% of employed young people).</p><p> </p><p>Many people in full-time education are employed on zero hours’ contracts, in part because of the flexibility they provide. 18.5% of all people in 2018 (Apr-Jun) on zero hours’ contracts were in full-time education – compared to 2.3% of people not on a zero hours’ contract.</p><p> </p><p>The ONS data shows that the majority of people on zero hours’ contracts are happy with the hours provided by their zero hours’ contract.</p>
answering member constituency Reading West more like this
answering member printed Alok Sharma more like this
question first answered
less than 2018-11-20T16:24:01.813Zmore like thismore than 2018-11-20T16:24:01.813Z
answering member
4014
label Biography information for Alok Sharma more like this
previous answer version
85857
answering member constituency Reading West more like this
answering member printed Alok Sharma more like this
answering member
4014
label Biography information for Alok Sharma more like this
tabling member
4243
label Biography information for Dan Jarvis more like this
1005855
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2018-11-12more like thismore than 2018-11-12
answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept id 29 more like this
answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
hansard heading State Retirement Pensions: Females more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent representations she has received from women in Jarrow constituency affected by measures taken to equalise the state pension age; and if she will make a statement. more like this
tabling member constituency Jarrow more like this
tabling member printed
Mr Stephen Hepburn more like this
uin 190367 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2018-11-20more like thismore than 2018-11-20
answer text <p>The policy of increasing State Pension age due to changes in life expectancy and equality legislation is enshrined in the 1995, 2007 and 2011 Pensions Act. It is a policy agreed by all governments in the last 23 years whatever their political persuasion – in 1995 Conservative, Labour in 1997-2010 and Coalition 2010-2015.</p><p>The Department for Work and Pensions receives a number of recent representations on the measures taken to equalise the State Pension age from individuals and from Members of Parliament writing on their behalf, as it does on many issues. We are unable to state specifically how many representations are from Jarrow constituency</p><p>This matter has been comprehensively debated on many occasions in Parliament. The Government will not be making changes to its policy on state pension age for women born in the 1950s.</p> more like this
answering member constituency Hexham more like this
answering member printed Guy Opperman more like this
question first answered
less than 2018-11-20T16:45:36.937Zmore like thismore than 2018-11-20T16:45:36.937Z
answering member
4142
label Biography information for Guy Opperman more like this
tabling member
520
label Biography information for Mr Stephen Hepburn more like this
1006016
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2018-11-13more like thismore than 2018-11-13
answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
answering dept id 54 more like this
answering dept short name Justice more like this
answering dept sort name Justice more like this
hansard heading Domestic Abuse: Restraining Orders more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that victims of domestic abuse are protected in cases where their attacker's restraining order is varied. more like this
tabling member constituency Harlow more like this
tabling member printed
Robert Halfon more like this
uin 190858 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2018-11-20more like thismore than 2018-11-20
answer text <p>The Protection from Harassment Act 1997 allows the court, upon conviction or acquittal, to make a restraining order for the purpose of protecting the victim from conduct that amounts to harassment or that will cause fear of violence.</p><p>The primary consideration of the court is that restraining orders remain necessary for the purpose of protecting the victim. When an application to vary a restraining order is made, the judiciary must consider the impact on the victim. Any application to vary must be shared with the victim to allow them to give their views before an order can be varied. All decisions on a variation are always communicated to the CPS, the police and the victim so that consideration can be made as to any additional protection that may be required. Departmental procedures require the police to receive notice within 30 minutes of an order being varied, so that they can take immediate steps if that is necessary.</p> more like this
answering member constituency Charnwood more like this
answering member printed Edward Argar more like this
question first answered
less than 2018-11-20T16:42:52.533Zmore like thismore than 2018-11-20T16:42:52.533Z
answering member
4362
label Biography information for Edward Argar more like this
tabling member
3985
label Biography information for Robert Halfon more like this
1005794
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2018-11-12more like thismore than 2018-11-12
answering body
Department for Education more like this
answering dept id 60 more like this
answering dept short name Education more like this
answering dept sort name Education more like this
hansard heading Schools: Admissions more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the report entitled It might be best if you looked elsewhere: An investigation into the schools admission process, whether his Department has acted on the recommendations made in that report. more like this
tabling member constituency East Kilbride, Strathaven and Lesmahagow more like this
tabling member printed
Dr Lisa Cameron more like this
uin 190488 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2018-11-20more like thismore than 2018-11-20
answer text <p>The Department wants fair access to a good school place for every child and routinely keeps the school admissions system under review. In setting their admission arrangements, admission authorities must ensure the practices and the criteria used to decide the allocation of places are fair, clear, objective and comply with admissions law and equalities law.</p><p> </p> more like this
answering member constituency Bognor Regis and Littlehampton more like this
answering member printed Nick Gibb more like this
question first answered
less than 2018-11-20T16:43:21.457Zmore like thismore than 2018-11-20T16:43:21.457Z
answering member
111
label Biography information for Nick Gibb more like this
tabling member
4412
label Biography information for Dr Lisa Cameron more like this