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225488
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-03-05more like thismore than 2015-03-05
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Restraining Orders more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many restraining orders issued by the courts were breached (a) once, (b) twice and (c) on more than three occasions in each of the last five years. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Richmond Park more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Zac Goldsmith more like this
star this property uin 226455 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-03-12more like thismore than 2015-03-12
star this property answer text <p /> <p>I am replying as the Ministry of Justice has overall responsibility for this legislation. The Government is absolutely clear that stalking and harassment, which cause misery for victims, are totally unacceptable. That is why in 2012 we added to the existing offences in the Protection from Harassment Act 1997 (harassment (section 2) and putting people in fear of violence (section 4)) two new specific offences of stalking (section 2A) and stalking involving fear of violence or serious alarm or distress (section 4A).</p><p> </p><p>The 1997 Act also gives the courts the option, upon conviction or acquittal for an offence under it, of making a restraining order for the purpose of protecting the victim of an offence, or any other person mentioned in the order, from conduct that amounts to harassment or that will cause fear of violence. Breach of such an order is a criminal offence carrying a maximum sentence of five years in prison, or a fine, or both.</p><p> </p><p>The number of offenders convicted on one, two, or three or more occasions, in each of the last five years for which data is available, of breaching a restraining order can be viewed in the table below. These figures have been drawn from an extract of the Police National Computer (PNC) data held by the Department. The PNC holds details of all convictions and cautions given for recordable offences. As with any large scale recording system the PNC is subject to possible errors with data entry and processing so data provided may be subject to revision.<br></p><p> </p><p /> <p> </p><p /><table><tbody><tr><td colspan="4"><p><strong>Number of offenders breaching restraining orders<sup>1</sup>, England and Wales<sup>2</sup></strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong> </strong></p></td><td colspan="3"><p><strong>Number of restraining order breach offences<sup>3</sup></strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>12 months ending September<sup>4</sup></strong></p></td><td><p><strong>1</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>3 or more</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010</p></td><td><p>1,655</p></td><td><p>211</p></td><td><p>71</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2011</p></td><td><p>2,738</p></td><td><p>456</p></td><td><p>138</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2012</p></td><td><p>3,638</p></td><td><p>607</p></td><td><p>216</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>4,086</p></td><td><p>710</p></td><td><p>221</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2014</p></td><td><p>4,822</p></td><td><p>767</p></td><td><p>244</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="3"><p><strong>Data Source</strong>: MoJs copy of the Police National Computer</p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p><sup>1.</sup> Includes offences covered by:</p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="4"><p>- Breach of a restraining order under s5 of the Protection from Harassment Act 1997</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="4"><p>- Breach of restraining Order under s5A of the Sex Offenders Act 1997 (Sexual Offences Prevention Orders replaced restraining orders under s.5A Sex Offenders Act 1997. However, it is possible for cases to still appear where an offender is subject to one of the orders that pre-date the Sexual Offences Act 2003)</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="4"><p>- Breach of a restraining order on acquittal under s.5A of the Protection from Harassment Act 1997</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="2"><p><sup>2.</sup> England and Wales includes all 43 police force areas and the British Transport Police</p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="4"><p><sup>3.</sup> Where the primary offence on a given occasion was a restraining order breach offence.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="4"><p><sup>4.</sup> The same offender may appear in multiple years.</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p /> <p>The number of restraining orders issued and sentences given for breaches of restraining orders, from 2009 to 2013 (the latest available) in England and Wales, can be viewed in the table below. These figures are taken from the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) court proceedings database.</p><p> </p><p /> <p><strong>Number of restraining orders issued and sentences given for breaches of restraining orders, England &amp; Wales, 2009 to 2013<sup>(1)(2)</sup></strong></p><p /> <p /><table><tbody><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p>2009</p></td><td><p>2010</p></td><td><p>2011</p></td><td><p>2012</p></td><td><p>2013</p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Offenders issued with a restraining order<sup>(3)(4)(5)</sup></p></td><td><p>5,074</p></td><td><p>10,761</p></td><td><p>19,551</p></td><td><p>20,067</p></td><td><p>20,304</p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Offenders convicted for breaching a restraining order</p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Convicted</p></td><td><p>1,464</p></td><td><p>2,920</p></td><td><p>4,558</p></td><td><p>5,699</p></td><td><p>6,337</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Sentenced</p></td><td><p>1,329</p></td><td><p>2,798</p></td><td><p>4,431</p></td><td><p>5,608</p></td><td><p>6,194</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Immediate custody</p></td><td><p>457</p></td><td><p>904</p></td><td><p>1,594</p></td><td><p>2,101</p></td><td><p>2,236</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Suspended sentence</p></td><td><p>178</p></td><td><p>381</p></td><td><p>507</p></td><td><p>667</p></td><td><p>822</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Community sentence</p></td><td><p>371</p></td><td><p>779</p></td><td><p>1,299</p></td><td><p>1,461</p></td><td><p>1,563</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Fine</p></td><td><p>141</p></td><td><p>321</p></td><td><p>469</p></td><td><p>705</p></td><td><p>847</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Absolute discharge</p></td><td><p>5</p></td><td><p>15</p></td><td><p>19</p></td><td><p>28</p></td><td><p>40</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Conditional discharge</p></td><td><p>93</p></td><td><p>237</p></td><td><p>385</p></td><td><p>462</p></td><td><p>469</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Otherwise dealt with</p></td><td><p>84</p></td><td><p>161</p></td><td><p>158</p></td><td><p>184</p></td><td><p>217</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p /><table><tbody><tr><td colspan="6"><p>(1) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.</p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="6"><p>(2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.</p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="6"><p>(3) Includes restraining orders issued on conviction or acquittal.</p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="2"><p>(4) Issued under either S.5 Protection from Harassment Act 1997 or S.5A Sex Offenders Act 1997.</p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="6"><p>(5) Sexual Offences Prevention Orders replaced restraining orders under s.5A Sex Offenders Act 1997 and Sex Offender Orders under s.2 Crime and Disorder Act 1998. However, it is possible for cases to still appear where an offender is subject to one of the orders that pre-date the Sexual Offences Act 2003.</p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services - Ministry of Justice.</p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p>PQ: 226457</p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr></tbody></table><p /> <p /> <p>Court proceedings data for 2014 are planned for publication in May 2015.</p><p> </p><p>Figures taken from the PNC database will differ from figures taken from the MoJ court proceedings database. Hence, police recorded crime and court proceedings data are not directly comparable.</p><p> </p><p>As the Violence Against Women and Girls Report (Home Office, 2015) notes: “Increases in reporting of domestic abuse incidents indicate that victims have more confidence in the criminal justice system. Prosecutions for domestic abuse have increased while out of court disposals for domestic abuse at the pre-charge stage have reached their lowest levels, and we have seen increases in the volume of prosecutions and conviction rate for all VAWG offences. These figures are showing that not only are victims more confident in coming forward – the criminal justice system is delivering improved outcomes for them.”</p>
star this property answering member constituency Bermondsey and Old Southwark remove filter
star this property answering member printed Simon Hughes more like this
star this property grouped question UIN 226457 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-03-12T17:30:07.77Zmore like thismore than 2015-03-12T17:30:07.77Z
star this property answering member
194
star this property label Biography information for Simon Hughes more like this
star this property tabling member
4062
unstar this property label Biography information for Zac Goldsmith more like this
173680
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-01-14more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Family Courts: Domestic Abuse more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what practice directions are in place on the allocation of judges in civic and family courts to domestic violence cases; and how many judges on average are involved in such cases. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Feltham and Heston more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Seema Malhotra more like this
star this property uin 220701 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-01-19more like thismore than 2015-01-19
star this property answer text <p /> <p>The allocation of judges in Family Court cases involving domestic violence is governed by Part 5 of the Family Court (Composition and Distribution of Business) Rules 2014, which came into force on 22nd April 2014.</p><p><a href="http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2014/840/part/5/made" target="_blank">http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2014/840/part/5/made</a></p><p>The allocation process for applications and proceedings in domestic violence cases (set out in Part 5 of the Rules) is governed by whether the application is being brought under Part 4 of the Family Law Act 1996.</p><p>Domestic violence cases brought to the Family Court under Part 4 of the Family Law Act 1996 can therefore be heard by any judge sitting in the Family Court. We do not collect data on how many of the Family Court judges are involved in domestic violence cases.</p><p>Practice Direction 12J (Child Arrangements and Contact Orders: Domestic Violence and Harm) sets out what the Family Court should do in any case in which it is “alleged or admitted, or there is other reason to believe, that the child or a party has experienced domestic violence or abuse perpetrated by another party or that there is a risk of such violence or abuse”;</p><p><a href="https://www.justice.gov.uk/courts/procedure-rules/family/practice_directions/pd_part_12j" target="_blank">https://www.justice.gov.uk/courts/procedure-rules/family/practice_directions/pd_part_12j</a></p>
star this property answering member constituency Bermondsey and Old Southwark remove filter
star this property answering member printed Simon Hughes more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-01-19T17:11:43.483Zmore like thismore than 2015-01-19T17:11:43.483Z
star this property answering member
194
star this property label Biography information for Simon Hughes more like this
star this property tabling member
4253
unstar this property label Biography information for Seema Malhotra more like this
223366
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-02-24more like thismore than 2015-02-24
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Domestic Abuse: Lancashire more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many domestic violence trials in each magistrates' and Crown court in Lancashire in 2014 (a) collapsed and (b) were postponed due to the complainant not being present. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Preston more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Mark Hendrick more like this
star this property uin 225139 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-03-04more like thismore than 2015-03-04
star this property answer text <p /> <p>The information requested in relation to both the magistrates’ courts and Crown Court is not held centrally and could only be provided by accessing and examining individual files at a disproportionate cost.</p><p> </p><p>Computerised data is available on the number of adult trials which did not proceed because a prosecution witness did not attend. However it is not possible to filter down that information to domestic violence trials or to the non attendance of the complainant in domestic violence cases as the computer recording systems for the magistrates’ and Crown court do not break down trial data into specific types of cases or types of witnesses (complainant or other).</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Bermondsey and Old Southwark remove filter
star this property answering member printed Simon Hughes more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-03-04T10:23:22.403Zmore like thismore than 2015-03-04T10:23:22.403Z
star this property answering member
194
star this property label Biography information for Simon Hughes more like this
star this property tabling member
473
unstar this property label Biography information for Sir Mark Hendrick more like this
225490
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-03-05more like thismore than 2015-03-05
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Restraining Orders more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many restraining orders were (a) issued by the courts, (b) breached and (c) resulted in the imposition of a penalty in each of the last five years. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Richmond Park more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Zac Goldsmith more like this
star this property uin 226457 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-03-12more like thismore than 2015-03-12
star this property answer text <p>I am replying as the Ministry of Justice has overall responsibility for this legislation. The Government is absolutely clear that stalking and harassment, which cause misery for victims, are totally unacceptable. That is why in 2012 we added to the existing offences in the Protection from Harassment Act 1997 (harassment (section 2) and putting people in fear of violence (section 4)) two new specific offences of stalking (section 2A) and stalking involving fear of violence or serious alarm or distress (section 4A).</p><p> </p><p>The 1997 Act also gives the courts the option, upon conviction or acquittal for an offence under it, of making a restraining order for the purpose of protecting the victim of an offence, or any other person mentioned in the order, from conduct that amounts to harassment or that will cause fear of violence. Breach of such an order is a criminal offence carrying a maximum sentence of five years in prison, or a fine, or both.</p><p> </p><p>The number of offenders convicted on one, two, or three or more occasions, in each of the last five years for which data is available, of breaching a restraining order can be viewed in the table below. These figures have been drawn from an extract of the Police National Computer (PNC) data held by the Department. The PNC holds details of all convictions and cautions given for recordable offences. As with any large scale recording system the PNC is subject to possible errors with data entry and processing so data provided may be subject to revision.<br></p><p> </p><p /> <p> </p><p /><table><tbody><tr><td colspan="4"><p><strong>Number of offenders breaching restraining orders<sup>1</sup>, England and Wales<sup>2</sup></strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong> </strong></p></td><td colspan="3"><p><strong>Number of restraining order breach offences<sup>3</sup></strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>12 months ending September<sup>4</sup></strong></p></td><td><p><strong>1</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>3 or more</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010</p></td><td><p>1,655</p></td><td><p>211</p></td><td><p>71</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2011</p></td><td><p>2,738</p></td><td><p>456</p></td><td><p>138</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2012</p></td><td><p>3,638</p></td><td><p>607</p></td><td><p>216</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>4,086</p></td><td><p>710</p></td><td><p>221</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2014</p></td><td><p>4,822</p></td><td><p>767</p></td><td><p>244</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="3"><p><strong>Data Source</strong>: MoJs copy of the Police National Computer</p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p><sup>1.</sup> Includes offences covered by:</p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="4"><p>- Breach of a restraining order under s5 of the Protection from Harassment Act 1997</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="4"><p>- Breach of restraining Order under s5A of the Sex Offenders Act 1997 (Sexual Offences Prevention Orders replaced restraining orders under s.5A Sex Offenders Act 1997. However, it is possible for cases to still appear where an offender is subject to one of the orders that pre-date the Sexual Offences Act 2003)</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="4"><p>- Breach of a restraining order on acquittal under s.5A of the Protection from Harassment Act 1997</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="2"><p><sup>2.</sup> England and Wales includes all 43 police force areas and the British Transport Police</p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="4"><p><sup>3.</sup> Where the primary offence on a given occasion was a restraining order breach offence.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="4"><p><sup>4.</sup> The same offender may appear in multiple years.</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p /> <p>The number of restraining orders issued and sentences given for breaches of restraining orders, from 2009 to 2013 (the latest available) in England and Wales, can be viewed in the table below. These figures are taken from the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) court proceedings database.</p><p> </p><p /> <p><strong>Number of restraining orders issued and sentences given for breaches of restraining orders, England &amp; Wales, 2009 to 2013<sup>(1)(2)</sup></strong></p><p /> <p /><table><tbody><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p>2009</p></td><td><p>2010</p></td><td><p>2011</p></td><td><p>2012</p></td><td><p>2013</p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Offenders issued with a restraining order<sup>(3)(4)(5)</sup></p></td><td><p>5,074</p></td><td><p>10,761</p></td><td><p>19,551</p></td><td><p>20,067</p></td><td><p>20,304</p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Offenders convicted for breaching a restraining order</p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Convicted</p></td><td><p>1,464</p></td><td><p>2,920</p></td><td><p>4,558</p></td><td><p>5,699</p></td><td><p>6,337</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Sentenced</p></td><td><p>1,329</p></td><td><p>2,798</p></td><td><p>4,431</p></td><td><p>5,608</p></td><td><p>6,194</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Immediate custody</p></td><td><p>457</p></td><td><p>904</p></td><td><p>1,594</p></td><td><p>2,101</p></td><td><p>2,236</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Suspended sentence</p></td><td><p>178</p></td><td><p>381</p></td><td><p>507</p></td><td><p>667</p></td><td><p>822</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Community sentence</p></td><td><p>371</p></td><td><p>779</p></td><td><p>1,299</p></td><td><p>1,461</p></td><td><p>1,563</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Fine</p></td><td><p>141</p></td><td><p>321</p></td><td><p>469</p></td><td><p>705</p></td><td><p>847</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Absolute discharge</p></td><td><p>5</p></td><td><p>15</p></td><td><p>19</p></td><td><p>28</p></td><td><p>40</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Conditional discharge</p></td><td><p>93</p></td><td><p>237</p></td><td><p>385</p></td><td><p>462</p></td><td><p>469</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Otherwise dealt with</p></td><td><p>84</p></td><td><p>161</p></td><td><p>158</p></td><td><p>184</p></td><td><p>217</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p /><table><tbody><tr><td colspan="6"><p>(1) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.</p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="6"><p>(2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.</p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="6"><p>(3) Includes restraining orders issued on conviction or acquittal.</p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="2"><p>(4) Issued under either S.5 Protection from Harassment Act 1997 or S.5A Sex Offenders Act 1997.</p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="6"><p>(5) Sexual Offences Prevention Orders replaced restraining orders under s.5A Sex Offenders Act 1997 and Sex Offender Orders under s.2 Crime and Disorder Act 1998. However, it is possible for cases to still appear where an offender is subject to one of the orders that pre-date the Sexual Offences Act 2003.</p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services - Ministry of Justice.</p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p>PQ: 226457</p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr></tbody></table><p /> <p /> <p>Court proceedings data for 2014 are planned for publication in May 2015.</p><p> </p><p>Figures taken from the PNC database will differ from figures taken from the MoJ court proceedings database. Hence, police recorded crime and court proceedings data are not directly comparable.</p><p> </p><p>As the Violence Against Women and Girls Report (Home Office, 2015) notes: “Increases in reporting of domestic abuse incidents indicate that victims have more confidence in the criminal justice system. Prosecutions for domestic abuse have increased while out of court disposals for domestic abuse at the pre-charge stage have reached their lowest levels, and we have seen increases in the volume of prosecutions and conviction rate for all VAWG offences. These figures are showing that not only are victims more confident in coming forward – the criminal justice system is delivering improved outcomes for them.”</p>
star this property answering member constituency Bermondsey and Old Southwark remove filter
star this property answering member printed Simon Hughes more like this
star this property grouped question UIN 226455 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-03-12T17:30:07.91Zmore like thismore than 2015-03-12T17:30:07.91Z
star this property answering member
194
star this property label Biography information for Simon Hughes more like this
star this property tabling member
4062
unstar this property label Biography information for Zac Goldsmith more like this
224031
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-02-26more like thismore than 2015-02-26
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Child Arrangements Orders: Grandparents more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 12 February 2015 to Question 223614, how many such applications by grandparents for child arrangement orders were successful in each of those financial years; and how many such orders were breached in each of those financial years. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Bristol North West more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Charlotte Leslie more like this
star this property uin 225681 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-03-03more like thismore than 2015-03-03
star this property answer text <p /> <p>Details of the number of applications by grandparents for child arrangement orders which were successful in each of those financial years and how many such orders were breached can only be obtained by manually checking every case file which can only be done at disproportionate costs.</p><p> </p><p>The Children Act 1989 makes the welfare of the child the paramount consideration when the court determines any question with respect to the child’s upbringing. The terms of any order made may not therefore reflect what was sought in the application.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Bermondsey and Old Southwark remove filter
star this property answering member printed Simon Hughes more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-03-03T10:53:01.823Zmore like thismore than 2015-03-03T10:53:01.823Z
star this property answering member
194
star this property label Biography information for Simon Hughes more like this
star this property tabling member
3933
unstar this property label Biography information for Charlotte Leslie more like this
223361
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-02-24more like thismore than 2015-02-24
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Information Commissioner more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average percentage pay rise was of Executive Team staff at the Information Commissioner's Office since June 2014; and what average pay increase has been proposed for non-executive staff excluding buy-out of contractual progression. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Wansbeck more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Ian Lavery more like this
star this property uin 225274 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-03-03more like thismore than 2015-03-03
star this property answer text <p /> <p>In July 2014 the Executive Team of the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) was restructured and reduced from the Commissioner plus four Directors to the Commissioner plus three Directors. As a part of the restructure, the Remuneration Committee of the ICO’s non-executive Management Board reviewed the salaries of the remaining Directors and made recommendations to the Commissioner based on the changes to individual Director’s responsibilities that resulted from the restructure. The mean percentage increase was 11.7% but as a result of the restructure the overall spend on Executive salaries has been reduced.</p><p> </p><p>The ICO is subject to the 1% public sector pay cap but it is the ICO’s intention to focus the money available under the cap on those staff who will not benefit from the buyout of contractual progression, providing a pay increase of 3% for most of these staff.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Bermondsey and Old Southwark remove filter
star this property answering member printed Simon Hughes more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-03-03T10:13:23.073Zmore like thismore than 2015-03-03T10:13:23.073Z
star this property answering member
194
star this property label Biography information for Simon Hughes more like this
star this property tabling member
4139
unstar this property label Biography information for Ian Lavery more like this
224030
star this property registered interest true more like this
star this property date less than 2015-02-26more like thismore than 2015-02-26
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Mediation more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to promote mediation in the resolution of family and other legal disputes; and if he will make a statement. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Thirsk and Malton more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Miss Anne McIntosh more like this
star this property uin 225655 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-03-05more like thismore than 2015-03-05
star this property answer text <p /> <p>In order to promote the use of mediation as a first step towards dispute resolution for separating families, as of 22 April 2014 it is now a legislative requirement that anyone considering applying to court for an order about their children or finances is legally obliged to attend a Mediation Information and Assessment Meeting (MIAM) first, unless specific exemptions apply (for example domestic violence).</p><p> </p><p>Following this legislative change, attendance at MIAMs increased in consecutive quarters, with 4,023 couples attending a MIAM between Jul-Sept 2014, which is a rise of 11% from the previous quarter and 20% from Jul-Sept 2013. Mediation starts are also rising, with an increase from 1783 in the period Apr-Jun 2014 to 1896 in the period Jul-Sep 2014.</p><p> </p><p>We know that there is a perception by some people that legal aid no longer covers mediation or legal help for mediation. This is not the case, and it is vital that this message is communicated as effectively as possible. Legal aid remains available for family mediation and for legal advice to support family mediation. In addition, as of 3 November 2014, the first single session of mediation is publicly funded in all cases provided one of the people involved is already legally aided. In these cases, both participants will be funded for the MIAM and for the first session of mediation. The combination of the compulsory MIAM and free first mediation session will help to introduce more people to the benefits of mediation, and away from the courts.</p><p> </p><p>A communications campaign - ‘First Stop: Family Mediation’ - has been launched to promote family mediation, and how to access it, and publicising the availability of legal aid for those who are eligible. The campaign went live on 2 January 2015 and includes online advertising, Google key word searches and Google Display adverts that direct people to the Family Mediation Council website and in particular, the find your local mediator tool. Other initiatives included a sponsored Q&amp;A discussion on Mumsnet as well as a social media campaign and media relations in the consumer media. This has resulted in a 320% increase in visitors to the FMC website in the first two months of the year as of 28 February this year compared to the last six months of 2014. The campaign runs until 20 March.</p><p> </p><p>To support the mediation profession, with MoJ assistance and guidance, the Family Mediation Council introduced a new Professional Standards Framework from 1 January 2015. This will provide the basis for a much needed consistent approach in how mediators should operate. It will allow the general public - the clients of mediation – to be confident in the service that is being provided; they will know what it means to go to mediation; they will understand that mediators are to be trusted as properly trained and accredited practitioners; and most importantly, they will know they are protected by a properly regulated profession.</p><p> </p><p>More widely, the Government actively encourages mediation in civil litigation cases through its support of the small-claims mediation service, and the mediation referral website. Signposting literature in the Courts, various provisions in the Civil Procedure Rules and the numerous pre-action protocols promote this. In addition the MoJ has received the Civil Justice Council’s report on Online Dispute Resolution for Low Value Civil Claims, and will respond in due course.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Bermondsey and Old Southwark remove filter
star this property answering member printed Simon Hughes more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-03-05T15:36:48.33Zmore like thismore than 2015-03-05T15:36:48.33Z
star this property answering member
194
star this property label Biography information for Simon Hughes more like this
star this property tabling member
384
unstar this property label Biography information for Baroness McIntosh of Pickering more like this
179191
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-02-11more like thismore than 2015-02-11
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Coroners more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the average number of days taken by coroners to release the body of a homicide victim back to the family for burial in each year since 2010. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Barnsley Central more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Dan Jarvis more like this
star this property uin 224221 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-02-26more like thismore than 2015-02-26
star this property answer text <p /> <p>Information on the average number of days taken by coroners to release the body of a homicide victim is not held centrally. This information could only be obtained by inspection of individual case files at each coroner’s office before collating the information, and this could only be done at disproportionate cost.</p><p> </p><p>In July 2013 we implemented reforms in the Coroners and Justice Act 2009 together with new coroner regulations and rules aimed at improving standards and achieving greater consistency in coroner services. Regulation 20 of the Coroners (Investigations) Regulations 2013 requires a coroner to release the body for burial or cremation as soon as is reasonably practicable. Where this cannot be done within 28 days, the coroner must notify the next of kin or personal representative of the reason for the delay.</p><p> </p><p>In February 2014 we also published the statutory “Guide to Coroner Services” which explains the standards of service that can be expected during a coroner’s investigation and what action can be taken if these are not met.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Bermondsey and Old Southwark remove filter
star this property answering member printed Simon Hughes more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-02-26T14:31:58.683Zmore like thismore than 2015-02-26T14:31:58.683Z
star this property answering member
194
star this property label Biography information for Simon Hughes more like this
star this property tabling member
4243
unstar this property label Biography information for Dan Jarvis more like this
176157
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-01-27more like thismore than 2015-01-27
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Prisoners: Children more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many children born to women serving a custodial sentence were taken into care in the most recent five years for which figures are available. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Burton more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Andrew Griffiths more like this
star this property uin 222241 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-02-02more like thismore than 2015-02-02
star this property answer text <p /> <p>Information on the number of children born to women serving a custodial sentence and taken into care is not collected by NOMS. This is of course a matter for Local Authority Social Services Departments and as such NOMS does not hold any data.</p><p> </p><p>There are trained family support workers in each prison with a good understanding of childcare proceedings and their role is to facilitate communication between all parties to ensure the needs of the children and women are adequately met.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Bermondsey and Old Southwark remove filter
star this property answering member printed Simon Hughes more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-02-02T15:01:54.53Zmore like thismore than 2015-02-02T15:01:54.53Z
star this property answering member
194
star this property label Biography information for Simon Hughes more like this
star this property tabling member
3936
unstar this property label Biography information for Andrew Griffiths more like this
174245
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-01-16more like thismore than 2015-01-16
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Sentencing: Bradford more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 25 November 2014 to Question 214963, what the (a) actual offence charged, (b) number of previous convictions, (c) number of previous knife crime convictions, (d) age of the offender, (e) other offences were charged and sentenced at the same time and (f) other information which formed part of the sentencing decision was in each case at Bradford Crown Court for which an immediate custodial sentence was not handed down. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Shipley more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Philip Davies more like this
star this property uin 221097 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-01-23more like thismore than 2015-01-23
star this property answer text <p /> <p>It has not been possible to answer these questions within the time available. I will write to my honourable friend in due course and a copy of the response will be placed in the Library.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Bermondsey and Old Southwark remove filter
star this property answering member printed Simon Hughes more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-01-23T14:58:29.723Zmore like thismore than 2015-01-23T14:58:29.723Z
star this property answering member
194
star this property label Biography information for Simon Hughes more like this
star this property tabling member
1565
unstar this property label Biography information for Philip Davies more like this