Linked Data API

Show Search Form

Search Results

1132830
registered interest false more like this
date remove maximum value filtermore like thismore than 2019-06-18
answering body
Attorney General more like this
answering dept id 88 more like this
answering dept short name Attorney General more like this
answering dept sort name Attorney General more like this
hansard heading Prosecutions: South Yorkshire more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Attorney General, what the average number of days taken from the date of offence to a decision to charge an individual in South Yorkshire in each year since 2010 was. more like this
tabling member constituency Wentworth and Dearne more like this
tabling member printed
John Healey more like this
uin 266094 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-06-26more like thismore than 2019-06-26
answer text <p>The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) works closely with the Police to ensure that cases are thoroughly investigated before charges are brought. There has been an increase in the complexity of cases investigated by the police, with investigations often involving large amounts of electronic material (social media, emails, text messages, video and photographs) which needs to be reviewed by prosecutors before a charging decision can be made. This impacts on the average number of consultations and length of time taken for prosecutors to reach a charging decision.</p><p> </p><p>The CPS does not maintain a record of the average number of days taken from offence through to a decision to charge. However, data is held on the average number of days from submission of a case by the police to the CPS to the date of the CPS decision to charge.</p><p> </p><p>Data relating to to all cases in South Yorkshire, summary only cases in South Yorkshire, and indictable only cases in South Yorkshire is shown in Annex A.</p><p> </p><p>The data in Annex A relating to summary only cases provides figures for only a minority of summary only cases. This is because the CPS is only responsible for charging a small minority of summary only matters, with the majority charged by the police. In 2017-18 the police charged 75% of all summary only matters with only 25% charged by CPS, while for indicatable only offences the CPS charged 95% of these cases.</p><p> </p><p>There are a number of reasons for the steady increase in the average number of days and average number of consultations per case since 2010/11. Police are now more regularly encouraged to seek ‘early investigative advice’ to help determine what evidence is required for a charge. Early investigative advice helps to ensure that cases are thoroughly investigated and the evidence to be brought before the court is strong. As a result, the CPS is more often involved at an earlier stage in proceedings which impacts on the average number of consultations and overall timeliness.</p>
answering member constituency South East Cambridgeshire more like this
answering member printed Lucy Frazer more like this
grouped question UIN
266095 more like this
266096 more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-06-26T10:24:58.863Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-26T10:24:58.863Z
answering member
4517
label Biography information for Lucy Frazer more like this
attachment
1
file name 266094, 266095 and 266096 - Annex A.docx more like this
title Annex A more like this
tabling member
400
label Biography information for John Healey more like this
1132831
registered interest false more like this
date remove maximum value filtermore like thismore than 2019-06-18
answering body
Attorney General more like this
answering dept id 88 more like this
answering dept short name Attorney General more like this
answering dept sort name Attorney General more like this
hansard heading Prosecutions: South Yorkshire more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Attorney General, what the average number of days taken from the date of an offence to a decision to charge and individual for summary offences in South Yorkshire in each year since 2010 was. more like this
tabling member constituency Wentworth and Dearne more like this
tabling member printed
John Healey more like this
uin 266095 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-06-26more like thismore than 2019-06-26
answer text <p>The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) works closely with the Police to ensure that cases are thoroughly investigated before charges are brought. There has been an increase in the complexity of cases investigated by the police, with investigations often involving large amounts of electronic material (social media, emails, text messages, video and photographs) which needs to be reviewed by prosecutors before a charging decision can be made. This impacts on the average number of consultations and length of time taken for prosecutors to reach a charging decision.</p><p> </p><p>The CPS does not maintain a record of the average number of days taken from offence through to a decision to charge. However, data is held on the average number of days from submission of a case by the police to the CPS to the date of the CPS decision to charge.</p><p> </p><p>Data relating to to all cases in South Yorkshire, summary only cases in South Yorkshire, and indictable only cases in South Yorkshire is shown in Annex A.</p><p> </p><p>The data in Annex A relating to summary only cases provides figures for only a minority of summary only cases. This is because the CPS is only responsible for charging a small minority of summary only matters, with the majority charged by the police. In 2017-18 the police charged 75% of all summary only matters with only 25% charged by CPS, while for indicatable only offences the CPS charged 95% of these cases.</p><p> </p><p>There are a number of reasons for the steady increase in the average number of days and average number of consultations per case since 2010/11. Police are now more regularly encouraged to seek ‘early investigative advice’ to help determine what evidence is required for a charge. Early investigative advice helps to ensure that cases are thoroughly investigated and the evidence to be brought before the court is strong. As a result, the CPS is more often involved at an earlier stage in proceedings which impacts on the average number of consultations and overall timeliness.</p>
answering member constituency South East Cambridgeshire more like this
answering member printed Lucy Frazer more like this
grouped question UIN
266094 more like this
266096 more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-06-26T10:24:58.927Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-26T10:24:58.927Z
answering member
4517
label Biography information for Lucy Frazer more like this
attachment
1
file name 266094, 266095 and 266096 - Annex A.docx more like this
title Annex A more like this
tabling member
400
label Biography information for John Healey more like this
1132834
registered interest false more like this
date remove maximum value filtermore like thismore than 2019-06-18
answering body
Attorney General more like this
answering dept id 88 more like this
answering dept short name Attorney General more like this
answering dept sort name Attorney General more like this
hansard heading Prosecutions: South Yorkshire more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Attorney General, what the average number of days taken from the date of an offence to a decision to charge an individual for an indictable offence in South Yorkshire in each year since 2010 was. more like this
tabling member constituency Wentworth and Dearne more like this
tabling member printed
John Healey more like this
uin 266096 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-06-26more like thismore than 2019-06-26
answer text <p>The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) works closely with the Police to ensure that cases are thoroughly investigated before charges are brought. There has been an increase in the complexity of cases investigated by the police, with investigations often involving large amounts of electronic material (social media, emails, text messages, video and photographs) which needs to be reviewed by prosecutors before a charging decision can be made. This impacts on the average number of consultations and length of time taken for prosecutors to reach a charging decision.</p><p> </p><p>The CPS does not maintain a record of the average number of days taken from offence through to a decision to charge. However, data is held on the average number of days from submission of a case by the police to the CPS to the date of the CPS decision to charge.</p><p> </p><p>Data relating to to all cases in South Yorkshire, summary only cases in South Yorkshire, and indictable only cases in South Yorkshire is shown in Annex A.</p><p> </p><p>The data in Annex A relating to summary only cases provides figures for only a minority of summary only cases. This is because the CPS is only responsible for charging a small minority of summary only matters, with the majority charged by the police. In 2017-18 the police charged 75% of all summary only matters with only 25% charged by CPS, while for indicatable only offences the CPS charged 95% of these cases.</p><p> </p><p>There are a number of reasons for the steady increase in the average number of days and average number of consultations per case since 2010/11. Police are now more regularly encouraged to seek ‘early investigative advice’ to help determine what evidence is required for a charge. Early investigative advice helps to ensure that cases are thoroughly investigated and the evidence to be brought before the court is strong. As a result, the CPS is more often involved at an earlier stage in proceedings which impacts on the average number of consultations and overall timeliness.</p>
answering member constituency South East Cambridgeshire more like this
answering member printed Lucy Frazer more like this
grouped question UIN
266094 more like this
266095 more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-06-26T10:24:58.987Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-26T10:24:58.987Z
answering member
4517
label Biography information for Lucy Frazer more like this
attachment
1
file name 266094, 266095 and 266096 - Annex A.docx more like this
title Annex A more like this
tabling member
400
label Biography information for John Healey more like this
1132928
registered interest false more like this
date remove maximum value filtermore like thismore than 2019-06-18
answering body
Attorney General more like this
answering dept id 88 more like this
answering dept short name Attorney General more like this
answering dept sort name Attorney General more like this
hansard heading Rape: Prosecutions more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Attorney General, what proportion of reported rape cases that were passed to the Crown Prosecution Service by the police forces of England and Wales were returned to the police for further evidence to be gathered in 2017-18. more like this
tabling member constituency Torfaen more like this
tabling member printed
Nick Thomas-Symonds more like this
uin 266227 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-06-24more like thismore than 2019-06-24
answer text <p>Rape is a horrific crime which has a significant and profound impact on victims. It is vital to ensure that cases are investigated thoroughly in order to bring them to justice. To achieve this, it is necessary in many cases to seek further information before a prosecutor is able to determine whether or not to charge. This process ensures that cases are as robust as possible once they reach the court.</p><p>In 2017-18, cases were referred back to the Police for 61% of suspects in cases recorded as rape in the system. Whilst one situation where the CPS may refer a case back to the Police is to request further evidence, it could also be in instances when the Police have sought ‘early investigative advice’ from the CPS to assist in determining the evidence required for a charge. It is not possible to separate cases where the CPS has requested further evidence and when the Police have sought early investigative advice.</p> more like this
answering member constituency South East Cambridgeshire more like this
answering member printed Lucy Frazer more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-06-24T15:26:16.1Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-24T15:26:16.1Z
answering member
4517
label Biography information for Lucy Frazer more like this
tabling member
4479
label Biography information for Nick Thomas-Symonds more like this
1132935
registered interest false more like this
date remove maximum value filtermore like thismore than 2019-06-18
answering body
Attorney General more like this
answering dept id 88 more like this
answering dept short name Attorney General more like this
answering dept sort name Attorney General more like this
hansard heading Rape: Prosecutions more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Attorney General, what proportion of reported rape cases in 2017-18 passed to the CPS by the police forces of England and Wales were returned to the police for further evidence to be gathered, and were not subsequently returned to the CPS with that further evidence. more like this
tabling member constituency Torfaen more like this
tabling member printed
Nick Thomas-Symonds more like this
uin 266233 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-06-24more like thismore than 2019-06-24
answer text <p>The CPS recognises that rape and serious sexual offences have a significant and profound impact on victims. It is vital to ensure that cases are investigated thoroughly in order to bring them to justice. To achieve this, it is necessary in many cases to seek further information before a prosecutor is able to determine whether or not to charge. In such cases, an action plan requesting further evidence will be provided to the police by the CPS.</p><p> </p><p>When the Police are unable to respond to the action plan, the case is administratively finalised. This is an administrative process where cases are closed on the CPS’s Case Management System if, after reminders from the CPS, the Police do not submit further information. Such cases may be reopened if, at a later date, new material is provided to the CPS by the Police enabling them to decide whether to charge.</p><p> </p><p>The Police may also seek ‘early investigative advice’ from the CPS to assist in determining the evidence required for a charge. In these cases the CPS may also administratively finalise a case if after receiving CPS advice, the Police do not re-submit the case.</p><p> </p><p>In 2017/18, 22% of all rape cases referred to the CPS were administratively finalised.</p>
answering member constituency South East Cambridgeshire more like this
answering member printed Lucy Frazer more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-06-24T16:34:49.637Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-24T16:34:49.637Z
answering member
4517
label Biography information for Lucy Frazer more like this
tabling member
4479
label Biography information for Nick Thomas-Symonds more like this
1131470
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2019-06-11more like thismore than 2019-06-11
answering body
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
answering dept id 201 more like this
answering dept short name Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
answering dept sort name Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
hansard heading Business: Billing more like this
house id 2 more like this
legislature
25277
pref label House of Lords more like this
question text To ask Her Majesty's Government when they will publish their response to Creating a responsible payment culture: a call for evidence on tackling late payment, which closed 29 November 2018; and why it has not yet been published when Cabinet Office Government Consultation Principles state that responses to consultations should be published within 12 weeks of the consultation closing. more like this
tabling member printed
Lord Mendelsohn more like this
uin HL16264 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-06-25more like thismore than 2019-06-25
answer text <p>The Creating a Responsible Payment Culture Call for Evidence received nearly 300 responses from a wide range of businesses, trade associations and individuals. This is the highest number of responses to a public consultation on this issue.</p><p> </p><p>It is important that have given those representations the consideration they deserve and use them to inform the action we will take on this important issue.</p><p> </p><p>The Government Response will be published shortly.</p> more like this
answering member printed Lord Henley more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-06-25T13:04:09.157Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-25T13:04:09.157Z
answering member
2616
label Biography information for Lord Henley more like this
tabling member
4286
label Biography information for Lord Mendelsohn more like this
1131473
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2019-06-11more like thismore than 2019-06-11
answering body
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
answering dept id 201 more like this
answering dept short name Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
answering dept sort name Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
hansard heading Greenhouse Gas Emissions more like this
house id 2 more like this
legislature
25277
pref label House of Lords more like this
question text To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Henley on 16 April (HL15075), what proportion of their £8.6 million Greenhouse Gas Removal research programme with UK Research and Innovation is targeted at the removal of greenhouses gasses other than carbon dioxide. more like this
tabling member printed
Lord Mendelsohn more like this
uin HL16267 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-06-25more like thismore than 2019-06-25
answer text <p>This information is publicly available on the Natural Environment Research Council website, from which the full list of projects funded by the Greenhouse Gas Removal research programme is provided in the attached document. One of the 13 projects is targeted at gasses other than carbon dioxide, specifically on new methodologies for removal of methane from the atmosphere. This project is receiving £223,782 in funding, or 3% of the programme total.</p> more like this
answering member printed Lord Henley more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-06-25T13:05:01.273Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-25T13:05:01.273Z
answering member
2616
label Biography information for Lord Henley more like this
attachment
1
file name GGR programme project list.pdf more like this
title Projects funded by the GGR research programme more like this
tabling member
4286
label Biography information for Lord Mendelsohn more like this
1131902
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2019-06-12more like thismore than 2019-06-12
answering body
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
answering dept id 201 more like this
answering dept short name Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
answering dept sort name Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
hansard heading Climate Change more like this
house id 2 more like this
legislature
25277
pref label House of Lords more like this
question text To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Henley on 17 April (HL15077), why they do not have any plans to increase global cooperation and governance of research on, and the use of, solar radiation management technologies; and what assessment, if any, they have made of the risk of that lack of plans leading to unilateral deployment without international consent more like this
tabling member printed
Lord Mendelsohn more like this
uin HL16320 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-06-26more like thismore than 2019-06-26
answer text <p>The priority of the UK Government is to tackle the root cause of climate change by reducing emissions of greenhouse gases from human activities and adapting to those impacts that are unavoidable. We are aware of independent existing efforts to increase cooperation and governance of research into solar radiation management technologies, such as the Carnegie Climate Governance Initiative and the ‘Oxford Principles’ for the governance of geoengineering. We have not formally assessed the risk that lack of plans may lead to unilateral deployment without international consent.</p> more like this
answering member printed Lord Henley more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-06-26T12:03:46.987Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-26T12:03:46.987Z
answering member
2616
label Biography information for Lord Henley more like this
tabling member
4286
label Biography information for Lord Mendelsohn more like this
1131904
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2019-06-12more like thismore than 2019-06-12
answering body
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
answering dept id 201 more like this
answering dept short name Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
answering dept sort name Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
hansard heading Electric Vehicles: Batteries more like this
house id 2 more like this
legislature
25277
pref label House of Lords more like this
question text To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Gardiner of Kimble on 20 May (HL15733), what activity they are undertaking to explore second life applications for electric vehicle batteries which are no longer able to perform as required; what proportion of electric vehicle batteries would be diverted to secondary use; and what discussions they have had with industry and researchers on that topic. more like this
tabling member printed
Lord Mendelsohn more like this
uin HL16322 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-06-26more like thismore than 2019-06-26
answer text <p>The Government has directly supported energy storage through research and innovation funding. This support includes current funding from BEIS for an energy storage cost reduction project, led by Nissan Motor Manufacturing (UK) Ltd, which is looking at reducing the cost of stationary energy storage by developing cost effective, large-scale processes for grading and sorting 2<sup>nd</sup> life Electric Vehicle batteries. This project is due to be completed by end March 2021.</p><p> </p><p>There are several projects being funded as part of the Collaborative Research &amp; Development (CR&amp;D) activity of the Faraday Battery Challenge working on the development of the technical aspects of remanufacture and understanding the economic viability of using electric vehicle batteries for second life applications. These range in focus from diagnostic techniques to establish the suitability of batteries for a second life application and inform warranties for the second life devices, to developing effective methods of remanufacture which includes optimising the initial battery design for remanufacture. Second life applications are also a topic of research in the Faraday Institution (FI) supported Recycling of Lithium-Ion Batteries (ReLIB) project, with a cohort group established from the participants of the Collaborative Research &amp; Development (CR&amp;D) and FI recycling and second life projects to share learning in this area. The business cases for the types of electric vehicle batteries which are suitable both physically and from an economic perspective for second life applications are under development across the industry. These applications are dependent, among other factors, on the rapidly changing cost of new batteries and the value and efficiency of recovering the materials compared to the cost of remanufacture. Discussions are active with industry and researchers on this topic, both as part of the recycling and reuse cohort as well as conversations with companies and organisations across the UK, covering topics such as data handling and sharing to enable assessment of battery health at the end of EV life. The UK is also actively engaged in the World Economic Forum Global Battery Alliance and European Battery Alliance working groups in recycling and reuse.</p><p> </p><p>These innovation projects exploring second life battery use will help to provide information on the proportion of electric vehicle batteries which could be cost-effectively diverted to secondary use.</p>
answering member printed Lord Henley more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-06-26T12:05:07.053Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-26T12:05:07.053Z
answering member
2616
label Biography information for Lord Henley more like this
tabling member
4286
label Biography information for Lord Mendelsohn more like this
1131906
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2019-06-12more like thismore than 2019-06-12
answering body
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
answering dept id 201 more like this
answering dept short name Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
answering dept sort name Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
hansard heading Iron and Steel: Manufacturing Industries more like this
house id 2 more like this
legislature
25277
pref label House of Lords more like this
question text To ask Her Majesty's Government why the British steel industry is paying more for electricity than its counterparts in Europe; what is the average megawatt price for steel producers in the UK; and how it compares with the cost of electricity for steel producers in France. more like this
tabling member printed
Lord Morris of Aberavon more like this
uin HL16324 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-07-09more like thismore than 2019-07-09
answer text <p>Between 2005 and 2010, industrial electricity prices rose by 64 per cent. Including taxes, industrial electricity prices rose from 4.77 pence per kWh in 2005 to 7.84 pence per kWh in 2010.</p><p>The steel sector has received more than £295 million in compensation since 2013 to make energy costs more competitive, including over £53 million during 2018. In addition, between 2017 and 2019, the Government has introduced policies that provide eligible steel producers with an 85% reduction in renewable energy policy costs in their electricity bills. Last year we announced the Industrial Energy Transformation Fund worth up to £315 million to support businesses with high energy use to transition to a low carbon future and to cut their bills through increased energy efficiency.</p><p>Between 2010 and 2017, industrial electricity prices (including taxes) have risen from 7.84 to 9.79 pence per kWh, an increase of 25%.</p><p> </p> more like this
answering member printed Lord Henley more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-07-09T16:58:41.697Zmore like thismore than 2019-07-09T16:58:41.697Z
answering member
2616
label Biography information for Lord Henley more like this
tabling member
565
label Biography information for Lord Morris of Aberavon more like this