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1137713
star this property registered interest false remove filter
star this property date less than 2019-07-09more like thismore than 2019-07-09
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Youth Offending Teams: Finance more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text Whether he plans to allocate additional funding to youth offending teams. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Stockton North more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Alex Cunningham more like this
star this property uin 911816 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-07-09more like thismore than 2019-07-09
star this property answer text <table><tbody><tr><td><p>We value the vital work Youth Offending Teams do with children who have offended, and the work they do to prevent offending. The Youth Justice Board’s total funding this year for frontline services including Youth Offending Teams is £72.2m. This is greater than last year’s funding, which was £71.6m.</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p>Of the £72.2m, £70.7m has been allocated to the core grant for Youth Offending Teams and £1.5m to frontline service improvement.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Charnwood remove filter
star this property answering member printed Edward Argar more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-07-09T16:01:26.29Zmore like thismore than 2019-07-09T16:01:26.29Z
unstar this property answering member
4362
star this property label Biography information for Edward Argar more like this
star this property tabling member
4122
unstar this property label Biography information for Alex Cunningham more like this
1132147
star this property registered interest false remove filter
star this property date less than 2019-06-13more like thismore than 2019-06-13
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Mentally Disordered Offenders: Prisoners' Transfers more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to reduce waiting times for the transfer of offenders to mental health hospitals under sections 47 and 48 of the Mental Health Act 1983. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency North Durham more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Mr Kevan Jones more like this
star this property uin 264365 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-21more like thismore than 2019-06-21
star this property answer text <table><tbody><tr><td><p>We are determined to improve the process of transfer from prison to hospital under the Mental Health Act to ensure delays are reduced. We take the mental health of prisoners extremely seriously, which is why we have increased the support available to vulnerable offenders, especially during the first 24 hours in custody. We are updating the mental health training for prison officers and so far over 24,000 new and existing prison staff have completed at least one module of the revised suicide and self-harm prevention training. HMPPS is working with NHS England and Public Health England to improve and redesign services for people in prison with mental health needs. This includes revising approaches to secure hospital transfers under section 47 and 48 of the Mental Health Act when a person needs to be in a hospital setting for their mental health assessment and treatment. HMPPS and NHS England have worked together to collect new evidence and have increased understanding of where transfers work well and how delays arise, identifying areas for improvement. NHS England are currently consulting on an updated version of DHSC’s good practice guidance on transfers and remissions, which will inform our approach. In addition, the independent review of the Mental Health Act, published in December 2018, made recommendations in relation to patients in the criminal justice system, which require detailed consideration in the context of transfers from prison to hospital and we will respond to these in due course. Officials in the Mental Health Casework Section (MHCS) in HMPPS issue transfer warrants on behalf of the Secretary of State. MHCS has an internal target to produce a transfer warrant within 24 hours of receipt of all necessary information. In the vast majority of cases (96%), transfer warrants are issued within 24 hours of MHCS receiving all necessary information. By holding partners to account where information is missing, MHCS has recently reduced the average time from initial notification to the issue of a warrant from 14 calendar days to 3 calendar days.</p></td></tr></tbody></table>
star this property answering member constituency Charnwood remove filter
star this property answering member printed Edward Argar more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-21T13:49:22.497Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-21T13:49:22.497Z
unstar this property answering member
4362
star this property label Biography information for Edward Argar more like this
star this property tabling member
1438
unstar this property label Biography information for Mr Kevan Jones more like this
1133669
star this property registered interest false remove filter
star this property date less than 2019-06-20more like thismore than 2019-06-20
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Criminal Injuries Compensation more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 9 May 2019 to Question 248641, what the average cost was of obtaining the medical evidence required for an application for compensation from the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme in each of the last two years for which data is available. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Ashfield more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Gloria De Piero more like this
star this property uin 267307 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-25more like thismore than 2019-06-25
star this property answer text <table><tbody><tr><td><p>The information requested could only be provided at disproportionate cost.</p></td></tr></tbody></table> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Charnwood remove filter
star this property answering member printed Edward Argar more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-25T11:42:33.017Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-25T11:42:33.017Z
unstar this property answering member
4362
star this property label Biography information for Edward Argar more like this
star this property tabling member
3915
unstar this property label Biography information for Gloria De Piero more like this
1133672
star this property registered interest false remove filter
star this property date less than 2019-06-20more like thismore than 2019-06-20
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Criminal Injuries Compensation more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 9 May 2019 to Question 248641, for how many applications for compensation from the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme the Government has covered the cost of providing initial medical evidence in each year since 2012. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Ashfield more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Gloria De Piero more like this
star this property uin 267309 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-25more like thismore than 2019-06-25
star this property answer text <table><tbody><tr><td><p>The information requested could only be provided at disproportionate cost.</p></td></tr></tbody></table> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Charnwood remove filter
star this property answering member printed Edward Argar more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-25T11:46:47.91Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-25T11:46:47.91Z
unstar this property answering member
4362
star this property label Biography information for Edward Argar more like this
star this property tabling member
3915
unstar this property label Biography information for Gloria De Piero more like this
1132902
star this property registered interest false remove filter
star this property date less than 2019-06-18more like thismore than 2019-06-18
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Young Offenders: Restraint Techniques more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether his Department collects data on the use of personal safety techniques on children in young offender institutions and secure training centres. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency South Shields more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Mrs Emma Lewell-Buck more like this
star this property uin 266202 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-24more like thismore than 2019-06-24
star this property answer text <table><tbody><tr><td><p>The Youth Custody Service does collect data on the use of personal safety techniques. The reasons for using these techniques are outlined in Prison Service Instruction 30/2015 (Amendment to Use of Force Prison Service Order 1600). The department publishes data on the use of force, and Non-Minimising and Managing Physical Restraint on young people in custody. The data is published annually and can be found via the link below. <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/youth-justice-statistics-2017-to-2018" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/youth-justice-statistics-2017-to-2018</a> The safety and welfare of young people held in custody is our highest priority. Restraint is only ever used as a last resort, where there is a risk of harm, and no other form of intervention is possible or appropriate. Every incident of restraint, including those involving personal safety techniques is reviewed individually by Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) staff to consider whether any lessons can be learned for the future. Charlie Taylor has been asked to review the Department’s policy on the use of pain-inducing techniques in the restraint of children and young people in the secure estate to ensure that our approach remains appropriate for the youth estate and in line with the latest research. He is due to report back to Ministers with his findings in the coming months.</p></td></tr></tbody></table>
star this property answering member constituency Charnwood remove filter
star this property answering member printed Edward Argar more like this
star this property grouped question UIN 266204 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-24T14:42:49.197Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-24T14:42:49.197Z
unstar this property answering member
4362
star this property label Biography information for Edward Argar more like this
star this property tabling member
4277
unstar this property label Biography information for Mrs Emma Lewell-Buck more like this
1132904
star this property registered interest false remove filter
star this property date less than 2019-06-18more like thismore than 2019-06-18
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Young Offenders: Restraint Techniques more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether his Department collects data on the reasons for non-Minimising and Managing Physical Restraint techniques being used on children in young offender institutions and secure training centres. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency South Shields more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Mrs Emma Lewell-Buck more like this
star this property uin 266204 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-24more like thismore than 2019-06-24
star this property answer text <table><tbody><tr><td><p>The Youth Custody Service does collect data on the use of personal safety techniques. The reasons for using these techniques are outlined in Prison Service Instruction 30/2015 (Amendment to Use of Force Prison Service Order 1600). The department publishes data on the use of force, and Non-Minimising and Managing Physical Restraint on young people in custody. The data is published annually and can be found via the link below. <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/youth-justice-statistics-2017-to-2018" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/youth-justice-statistics-2017-to-2018</a> The safety and welfare of young people held in custody is our highest priority. Restraint is only ever used as a last resort, where there is a risk of harm, and no other form of intervention is possible or appropriate. Every incident of restraint, including those involving personal safety techniques is reviewed individually by Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) staff to consider whether any lessons can be learned for the future. Charlie Taylor has been asked to review the Department’s policy on the use of pain-inducing techniques in the restraint of children and young people in the secure estate to ensure that our approach remains appropriate for the youth estate and in line with the latest research. He is due to report back to Ministers with his findings in the coming months.</p></td></tr></tbody></table>
star this property answering member constituency Charnwood remove filter
star this property answering member printed Edward Argar more like this
star this property grouped question UIN 266202 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-24T14:42:49.257Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-24T14:42:49.257Z
unstar this property answering member
4362
star this property label Biography information for Edward Argar more like this
star this property tabling member
4277
unstar this property label Biography information for Mrs Emma Lewell-Buck more like this
1127091
star this property registered interest false remove filter
star this property date less than 2019-05-16more like thismore than 2019-05-16
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Prisoners: Females more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many adult women with no previous convictions were taken into immediate custody from (a) Crown courts and (b) magistrates courts for sentences of (i) below six months and (ii) six months and over in each police force area in England and Wales in 2018-19; and what the offence classification was in each of those cases. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Delyn more like this
star this property tabling member printed
David Hanson more like this
star this property uin 255283 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-05-23more like thismore than 2019-05-23
star this property answer text <table><tbody><tr><td><p>Information on the numbers of adult women and adult men with no previous convictions who were taken into immediate custody from the Crown Courts and the Magistrates courts for sentences of below six months and six months and over are provided below. It is not possible to provide breakdowns by police force area because, due to low numbers, this would risk identification of the individuals concerned. <table><tbody><tr><td colspan="11"><p><strong>Number of adult<sup>1</sup> female offenders with no previous convictions<sup>2</sup> sentenced to immediate custody by court type<sup>3</sup>, sentence length<sup>4,5</sup> and offence type; England and Wales<sup>6</sup>, 2018</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="2"><p>Number of Offenders</p></td></tr><tr><td rowspan="2"><p><strong>Offence type<sup>7</sup></strong></p></td><td colspan="2"><p><strong>Crown Court</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Magistrates Court</strong></p></td><td colspan="2"><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>Less than 6 months</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>6 months or more</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Less than 6 months</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>6 months or more</strong></p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Violence against the person</p></td><td><p>1</p></td><td><p>144</p></td><td><p>4</p></td><td><p>2</p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Sexual offences</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>25</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Robbery</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>17</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Theft Offences</p></td><td><p>3</p></td><td><p>67</p></td><td><p>67</p></td><td><p>5</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Criminal damage and arson</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>20</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Drug offences</p></td><td><p>7</p></td><td><p>80</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>2</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Possession of weapons</p></td><td><p>3</p></td><td><p>18</p></td><td><p>7</p></td><td><p>1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Public order offences</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>8</p></td><td><p>3</p></td><td><p>0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Miscellaneous crimes against society</p></td><td><p>28</p></td><td><p>145</p></td><td><p>4</p></td><td><p>0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Fraud offences</p></td><td><p>3</p></td><td><p>91</p></td><td><p>2</p></td><td><p>1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Summary offences excluding motoring</p></td><td><p>2</p></td><td><p>1</p></td><td><p>14</p></td><td><p>1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Summary motoring offences</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>10</p></td><td><p>0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>All offences</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>47</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>616</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>111</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>12</strong></p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="3"><p><strong>Source: </strong>Ministry of Justice extract of the Police National Computer</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p><strong>Notes:</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p>1) Aged 18 or over at time of sentence.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p>2) Counting the number of female offenders who were convicted in court for the first time.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p>3) Includes crown and magistrates courts cases, where this information is recorded on the PNC.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p>4) 6 months has been assumed to be 180 days.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p>5) Excludes cases where the sentence length is not known</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p>6) England and Wales includes all 43 police force areas plus the British Transport Police</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p>7) For more detailed information on the offences included in each classification see the Offence Group Classifications file at the following link: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2017" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2017</a></p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p>8) The figures in these tables have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p><strong>Number of adult<sup>1</sup> male offenders with no previous convictions<sup>2</sup> sentenced to immediate custody by court type<sup>3</sup>, sentence length<sup>4,5</sup> and offence type; England and Wales<sup>6</sup>, 2018</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="2"><p>Number of Offenders</p></td></tr><tr><td rowspan="2"><p><strong>Offence type<sup>7</sup></strong></p></td><td colspan="2"><p><strong>Crown Court</strong></p></td><td><p><strong> Magistrates Court</strong></p></td><td colspan="2"><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>Less than 6 months</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>6 months or more</strong></p></td><td><p><strong> Less than 6 months</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>6 months or more</strong></p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Violence against the person</p></td><td><p>15</p></td><td><p>946</p></td><td><p>34</p></td><td><p>28</p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Sexual offences</p></td><td><p>16</p></td><td><p>1,420</p></td><td><p>24</p></td><td><p>20</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Robbery</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>161</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>4</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Theft Offences</p></td><td><p>16</p></td><td><p>321</p></td><td><p>141</p></td><td><p>23</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Criminal damage and arson</p></td><td><p>1</p></td><td><p>52</p></td><td><p>6</p></td><td><p>0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Drug offences</p></td><td><p>35</p></td><td><p>1,304</p></td><td><p>14</p></td><td><p>40</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Possession of weapons</p></td><td><p>28</p></td><td><p>152</p></td><td><p>107</p></td><td><p>16</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Public order offences</p></td><td><p>10</p></td><td><p>117</p></td><td><p>10</p></td><td><p>3</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Miscellaneous crimes against society</p></td><td><p>124</p></td><td><p>833</p></td><td><p>67</p></td><td><p>28</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Fraud offences</p></td><td><p>13</p></td><td><p>252</p></td><td><p>11</p></td><td><p>2</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Summary offences excluding motoring</p></td><td><p>27</p></td><td><p>2</p></td><td><p>262</p></td><td><p>12</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Summary motoring offences</p></td><td><p>2</p></td><td><p>1</p></td><td><p>76</p></td><td><p>0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>All offences</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>287</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>5,561</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>752</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>176</strong></p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="3"><p><strong>Source: </strong>Ministry of Justice extract of the Police National Computer</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p><strong>Notes:</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p>1) Aged 18 or over at time of sentence.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p>2) Counting the number of male offenders who were convicted in court for the first time.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p>3) Includes crown and magistrates courts cases, where this information is recorded on the PNC.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p>4) 6 months has been assumed to be 180 days.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p>5) Excludes cases where the sentence length is not known</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p>6) England and Wales includes all 43 police force areas plus the British Transport Police</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p>7) For more detailed information on the offences included in each classification see the Offence Group Classifications file at the following link: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2017" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2017</a></p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p>8) The figures in these tables have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large-scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.</p></td></tr></tbody></table></p></td></tr></tbody></table><p>There is persuasive evidence showing community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective than short custodial sentences in reducing reoffending. The MoJ study ‘The impact of short custodial sentences, community orders and suspended sentence orders on re-offending’ published in 2015 found that over a 1-year follow up period, a higher proportion of people re-offended having been sentenced to custody of under 12 months without supervision on release than other similar people given community orders.</p><p>Unless we tackle the underlying causes of offending, we cannot protect the public from being victims of crime. Effective community orders can address offenders’ behaviour, answer their mental health and alcohol or drug misuse needs, and provide reparation for the benefit of the wider community.</p><p>In the female offender strategy, published June 2018, we set out our vision to see fewer women coming into the criminal justice system, and a greater proportion managed successfully in the community.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Charnwood remove filter
star this property answering member printed Edward Argar more like this
star this property grouped question UIN 255284 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-23T14:06:29.903Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-23T14:06:29.903Z
unstar this property answering member
4362
star this property label Biography information for Edward Argar more like this
star this property tabling member
533
unstar this property label Biography information for David Hanson more like this
1127092
star this property registered interest false remove filter
star this property date less than 2019-05-16more like thismore than 2019-05-16
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Prisoners: Males more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many adult men with no previous convictions were taken into immediate custody from (a) Crown courts and (b) magistrates courts for sentences of (i) below six months and (ii) six months and over in each police force area in England and Wales in 2018-19; and what the offence classification was in each of those cases. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Delyn more like this
star this property tabling member printed
David Hanson more like this
star this property uin 255284 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-05-23more like thismore than 2019-05-23
star this property answer text <table><tbody><tr><td><p>Information on the numbers of adult women and adult men with no previous convictions who were taken into immediate custody from the Crown Courts and the Magistrates courts for sentences of below six months and six months and over are provided below. It is not possible to provide breakdowns by police force area because, due to low numbers, this would risk identification of the individuals concerned. <table><tbody><tr><td colspan="11"><p><strong>Number of adult<sup>1</sup> female offenders with no previous convictions<sup>2</sup> sentenced to immediate custody by court type<sup>3</sup>, sentence length<sup>4,5</sup> and offence type; England and Wales<sup>6</sup>, 2018</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="2"><p>Number of Offenders</p></td></tr><tr><td rowspan="2"><p><strong>Offence type<sup>7</sup></strong></p></td><td colspan="2"><p><strong>Crown Court</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Magistrates Court</strong></p></td><td colspan="2"><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>Less than 6 months</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>6 months or more</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Less than 6 months</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>6 months or more</strong></p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Violence against the person</p></td><td><p>1</p></td><td><p>144</p></td><td><p>4</p></td><td><p>2</p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Sexual offences</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>25</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Robbery</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>17</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Theft Offences</p></td><td><p>3</p></td><td><p>67</p></td><td><p>67</p></td><td><p>5</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Criminal damage and arson</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>20</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Drug offences</p></td><td><p>7</p></td><td><p>80</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>2</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Possession of weapons</p></td><td><p>3</p></td><td><p>18</p></td><td><p>7</p></td><td><p>1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Public order offences</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>8</p></td><td><p>3</p></td><td><p>0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Miscellaneous crimes against society</p></td><td><p>28</p></td><td><p>145</p></td><td><p>4</p></td><td><p>0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Fraud offences</p></td><td><p>3</p></td><td><p>91</p></td><td><p>2</p></td><td><p>1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Summary offences excluding motoring</p></td><td><p>2</p></td><td><p>1</p></td><td><p>14</p></td><td><p>1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Summary motoring offences</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>10</p></td><td><p>0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>All offences</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>47</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>616</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>111</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>12</strong></p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="3"><p><strong>Source: </strong>Ministry of Justice extract of the Police National Computer</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p><strong>Notes:</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p>1) Aged 18 or over at time of sentence.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p>2) Counting the number of female offenders who were convicted in court for the first time.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p>3) Includes crown and magistrates courts cases, where this information is recorded on the PNC.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p>4) 6 months has been assumed to be 180 days.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p>5) Excludes cases where the sentence length is not known</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p>6) England and Wales includes all 43 police force areas plus the British Transport Police</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p>7) For more detailed information on the offences included in each classification see the Offence Group Classifications file at the following link: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2017" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2017</a></p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p>8) The figures in these tables have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p><strong>Number of adult<sup>1</sup> male offenders with no previous convictions<sup>2</sup> sentenced to immediate custody by court type<sup>3</sup>, sentence length<sup>4,5</sup> and offence type; England and Wales<sup>6</sup>, 2018</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="2"><p>Number of Offenders</p></td></tr><tr><td rowspan="2"><p><strong>Offence type<sup>7</sup></strong></p></td><td colspan="2"><p><strong>Crown Court</strong></p></td><td><p><strong> Magistrates Court</strong></p></td><td colspan="2"><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>Less than 6 months</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>6 months or more</strong></p></td><td><p><strong> Less than 6 months</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>6 months or more</strong></p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Violence against the person</p></td><td><p>15</p></td><td><p>946</p></td><td><p>34</p></td><td><p>28</p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Sexual offences</p></td><td><p>16</p></td><td><p>1,420</p></td><td><p>24</p></td><td><p>20</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Robbery</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>161</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>4</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Theft Offences</p></td><td><p>16</p></td><td><p>321</p></td><td><p>141</p></td><td><p>23</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Criminal damage and arson</p></td><td><p>1</p></td><td><p>52</p></td><td><p>6</p></td><td><p>0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Drug offences</p></td><td><p>35</p></td><td><p>1,304</p></td><td><p>14</p></td><td><p>40</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Possession of weapons</p></td><td><p>28</p></td><td><p>152</p></td><td><p>107</p></td><td><p>16</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Public order offences</p></td><td><p>10</p></td><td><p>117</p></td><td><p>10</p></td><td><p>3</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Miscellaneous crimes against society</p></td><td><p>124</p></td><td><p>833</p></td><td><p>67</p></td><td><p>28</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Fraud offences</p></td><td><p>13</p></td><td><p>252</p></td><td><p>11</p></td><td><p>2</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Summary offences excluding motoring</p></td><td><p>27</p></td><td><p>2</p></td><td><p>262</p></td><td><p>12</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Summary motoring offences</p></td><td><p>2</p></td><td><p>1</p></td><td><p>76</p></td><td><p>0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>All offences</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>287</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>5,561</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>752</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>176</strong></p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="3"><p><strong>Source: </strong>Ministry of Justice extract of the Police National Computer</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p><strong>Notes:</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p>1) Aged 18 or over at time of sentence.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p>2) Counting the number of male offenders who were convicted in court for the first time.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p>3) Includes crown and magistrates courts cases, where this information is recorded on the PNC.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p>4) 6 months has been assumed to be 180 days.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p>5) Excludes cases where the sentence length is not known</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p>6) England and Wales includes all 43 police force areas plus the British Transport Police</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p>7) For more detailed information on the offences included in each classification see the Offence Group Classifications file at the following link: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2017" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2017</a></p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="11"><p>8) The figures in these tables have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large-scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.</p></td></tr></tbody></table></p></td></tr></tbody></table><p>There is persuasive evidence showing community sentences, in certain circumstances, are more effective than short custodial sentences in reducing reoffending. The MoJ study ‘The impact of short custodial sentences, community orders and suspended sentence orders on re-offending’ published in 2015 found that over a 1-year follow up period, a higher proportion of people re-offended having been sentenced to custody of under 12 months without supervision on release than other similar people given community orders.</p><p>Unless we tackle the underlying causes of offending, we cannot protect the public from being victims of crime. Effective community orders can address offenders’ behaviour, answer their mental health and alcohol or drug misuse needs, and provide reparation for the benefit of the wider community.</p><p>In the female offender strategy, published June 2018, we set out our vision to see fewer women coming into the criminal justice system, and a greater proportion managed successfully in the community.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Charnwood remove filter
star this property answering member printed Edward Argar more like this
star this property grouped question UIN 255283 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-23T14:06:30.013Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-23T14:06:30.013Z
unstar this property answering member
4362
star this property label Biography information for Edward Argar more like this
star this property tabling member
533
unstar this property label Biography information for David Hanson more like this
1131634
star this property registered interest false remove filter
star this property date less than 2019-06-12more like thismore than 2019-06-12
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Prison Officers: Misconduct more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many cases of alleged (a) misconduct and (b) gross misconduct by prison officers that lead to proceedings following an investigation lasting more than 12 months have (i) not been proven, (ii) led to management advice being issued, (iii) led to a written warning and (iv) led to dismissal in each of the last three years. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Dwyfor Meirionnydd more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Liz Saville Roberts more like this
star this property uin 263825 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-21more like thismore than 2019-06-21
star this property answer text <table><tbody><tr><td><p><table><tbody><tr><td><p><strong>Table 1: Conduct &amp; discipline cases<sup>1</sup> for misconduct and gross misconduct by band 3-5 prison officers<sup>2</sup> which lasted more than 12 months<sup>3</sup>, by outcome<sup>4</sup>, 2015/16 to 2017/18</strong> <table><tbody><tr><td><p>Misconduct</p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p>2015/16</p></td><td><p>2016/17</p></td><td><p>2017/18</p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p>Not been proven</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p>Management advice &amp; guidance</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>~</p></td><td><p>0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p>Written warning</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p>Dismissal</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p>Other outcomes<sup>5</sup></p></td><td><p>~</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>~</p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Gross Misconduct</p></td><td><p>Not been proven</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p>Management advice &amp; guidance</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>5</p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p>Written warning</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p>Dismissal</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p>Other outcomes<sup>5</sup></p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>~</p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr></tbody></table>Notes: 1. A case is defined as a unique combination of case and individual member of staff. Where more than one member of staff is involved in a single case these are counted separately in this table. Equally staff involved in more than one case during the year are counted multiple times. 2. Includes Band 3-4 / Prison Officer (incl. specialists), Band 4 / Supervising Officer and Band 5 / Custodial Managers. 3. Staff with no end date in the data, indicating open cases, have been excluded. 4. Information on the outcomes of any appeal is not included. 5. Includes where cases have been withdrawn/closed or where other disciplinary action was taken, such as financial penalties, regrades/downgrades, verbal warnings. '~ denotes suppressed values of 2 or fewer or other values which would allow values of 2 or fewer to be derived by subtraction. Low numbers are suppressed to prevent disclosure in accordance with the Data Protection Act, 1998.</p></td></tr></tbody></table></p></td></tr></tbody></table>
star this property answering member constituency Charnwood remove filter
star this property answering member printed Edward Argar more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-21T14:24:49.18Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-21T14:24:49.18Z
unstar this property answering member
4362
star this property label Biography information for Edward Argar more like this
star this property tabling member
4521
unstar this property label Biography information for Liz Saville Roberts more like this
1143184
star this property registered interest false remove filter
star this property date less than 2019-09-02more like thismore than 2019-09-02
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Sexual Offences more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what progress has been made on the Government's review of the handling of rape and sexual violence cases across the criminal justice system; what resources have been allocated to that review; and what steps her Department has taken to improve access to counselling and therapeutic support for people who have reported rape to the police in the last 12 months. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Tooting more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Dr Rosena Allin-Khan more like this
star this property uin 284636 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-09-09more like thismore than 2019-09-09
star this property answer text <p>a) The decline in the number of rape and serious sexual offences reaching court and being charged and prosecuted has, rightly, been the subject of public scrutiny and concern. It is essential that we grasp this issue, which is why the Criminal Justice Board (CJB) has committed to a cross-government end-to-end review of the Criminal Justice System’s (CJS) response to serious sexual violence and rape where the victim is over 18. We have established a Sub-Group of the CJB to oversee this review.</p><p> </p><p>The review is now well underway. The Cabinet Office have concluded initial analysis to identify key areas that merit further investigation. We are now gathering evidence and data from key groups and agencies across the CJS to enable us to better understand how handling and outcomes for rape cases could be improved. We continue to engage regularly with specialist stakeholders and victim organisations to ensure that the victim experience is central to our work.</p><p> </p><p>We have committed to publish a cross-system action plan at the conclusion of the review in Spring 2020. In efforts to accelerate the review, we will develop a set of interim recommendations before the end of the year.</p><p> </p><p>b) The review is being conducted by a cross-Government team comprised of officials from the Home Office, Ministry of Justice, Attorney General’s Office and Crown Prosecution Service, with support from the National Policing Lead for Adult Sexual Offences.</p><p> </p><p>c) Rape is a horrendous crime. It is essential that victims of rape have access to support when and where they need it most. In March this year we increased funding available to these essential services by 10% - up to £8m per year and totalling £24m over the next three years. This funding ensures that, for the first time, that there are government-funded services in all 42 of the country’s Police and Crime Commissioner (PCC) areas. This is in addition to the £68m we allocate to PCCs to locally deliver support services for victims of crime, including for victims of sexual violence.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Charnwood remove filter
star this property answering member printed Edward Argar more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-09-09T13:08:42.943Zmore like thismore than 2019-09-09T13:08:42.943Z
unstar this property answering member
4362
star this property label Biography information for Edward Argar more like this
star this property tabling member
4573
unstar this property label Biography information for Dr Rosena Allin-Khan more like this