Linked Data API

Show Search Form

Search Results

1126176
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2019-05-13more like thismore than 2019-05-13
answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept id 29 more like this
answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept sort name Work and Pensions remove filter
hansard heading Poverty more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what progress her Department has made on achieving Sustainable Development Goal 1 to end poverty in all its forms everywhere. more like this
tabling member constituency Airdrie and Shotts remove filter
tabling member printed
Neil Gray more like this
uin 253587 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-05-21more like thismore than 2019-05-21
answer text <p>The Department for Work and Pensions is leading work across Government to assess progress against sustainable development goal 1. The Prime Minister has committed the UK to undertaking a Voluntary National Review (VNR) on progress towards the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals Agenda. This will be presented to the UN’s High Level Political Forum in July this year.</p> more like this
answering member constituency Colchester more like this
answering member printed Will Quince more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-05-21T13:14:05.597Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-21T13:14:05.597Z
answering member
4423
label Biography information for Will Quince more like this
tabling member
4365
label Biography information for Neil Gray more like this
1146582
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2019-09-26more like thismore than 2019-09-26
answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept id 29 more like this
answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept sort name Work and Pensions remove filter
hansard heading Social Security Benefits: Payments more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what comparative assessment she has made of the average length of time for a claimant to receive their first (a) legacy benefit payment and (b) universal credit payment in the each of the last two years. more like this
tabling member constituency Airdrie and Shotts remove filter
tabling member printed
Neil Gray more like this
uin 291447 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-10-03more like thismore than 2019-10-03
answer text <p>The design of Universal Credit is fundamentally different to legacy benefits, so any assessment would not reflect this adequately.</p><p> </p><p>The Department published an assessment of legacy benefit and Universal Credit payment timeliness in its Annual Report and Accounts 2018-19. This showed that the speed of Universal Credit payments has continued to improve during its rollout and the Department continues to introduce improvements. Between February 2018 to February 2019 Universal Credit payment timeliness improved with 86% of new claims to Universal Credit receiving full payment on time in February 2019, an increase from 78% in February 2018.</p><p> </p><p>Monthly assessment periods align to the way the majority of employees are paid, and how utility companies and other service providers collect payments. This allows Universal Credit to be adjusted each month, which means that if a claimant’s income falls they will not have to wait several months for a rise in their Universal Credit.</p><p> </p><p>Overall, Universal Credit provides more tailored support, and makes it more financially rewarding to increase earnings when in employment compared to legacy benefits.</p>
answering member constituency Colchester more like this
answering member printed Will Quince more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-10-03T15:55:01.567Zmore like thismore than 2019-10-03T15:55:01.567Z
answering member
4423
label Biography information for Will Quince more like this
tabling member
4365
label Biography information for Neil Gray more like this
1146583
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2019-09-26more like thismore than 2019-09-26
answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept id 29 more like this
answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept sort name Work and Pensions remove filter
hansard heading Universal Credit: Payments more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment her Department has made of whether households have reduced their expenditure on non-essential items in order to avoid debt while waiting for their first payment of universal credit. more like this
tabling member constituency Airdrie and Shotts remove filter
tabling member printed
Neil Gray more like this
uin 291448 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-10-03more like thismore than 2019-10-03
answer text <p>For new claimants applying for Universal Credit (UC), new claim advances provide access to a payment for those in financial need, which can be accessed quickly, until their first UC payment is due.</p><p> </p><p>In addition to this, the Department has delivered a number of improvements to support claimants during their first assessment period, such as removing waiting days and paying those claimants moving from Housing Benefit onto Universal Credit a two week ‘transitional housing payment’. We are also introducing a two-week run on for eligible claimants of Income Support, Jobseeker’s Allowance and Employment and Support Allowance from July 2020.</p><p> </p><p>For those who need help with budgeting, support is available for Universal Credit claimants via the Money and Pensions Service (MaPS). MaPS will help UC claimants with personal budgeting and money management through its free helpline, printed guides and digital guidance.</p> more like this
answering member constituency Colchester more like this
answering member printed Will Quince more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-10-03T15:52:55.867Zmore like thismore than 2019-10-03T15:52:55.867Z
answering member
4423
label Biography information for Will Quince more like this
tabling member
4365
label Biography information for Neil Gray more like this
1146584
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2019-09-26more like thismore than 2019-09-26
answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept id 29 more like this
answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept sort name Work and Pensions remove filter
hansard heading Universal Credit: Payments more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of introducing a policy of backdating universal credit payments. more like this
tabling member constituency Airdrie and Shotts remove filter
tabling member printed
Neil Gray more like this
uin 291449 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-10-03more like thismore than 2019-10-03
answer text <p>Under Universal Credit, claims may be backdated, by up to one calendar month, in some circumstances for vulnerable claimants who may be delayed in claiming Universal Credit through no fault of their own. Claims may also be backdated in specific circumstances when a couple separates to ensure that there is no gap in entitlement between the couple claim and the new claim made by a single claimant.</p><p> </p><p>In order to provide the best possible support to our claimants it is important that we are able to have discussions about their claim and circumstances at the earliest possible opportunity, whether to support them back into work or to provide or signpost other support and guidance. It is therefore important that backdating provisions are used in specific circumstances, and that all claimants are encouraged to engage with us at the earliest opportunity.</p> more like this
answering member constituency Colchester more like this
answering member printed Will Quince more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-10-03T15:44:06.827Zmore like thismore than 2019-10-03T15:44:06.827Z
answering member
4423
label Biography information for Will Quince more like this
tabling member
4365
label Biography information for Neil Gray more like this
1146585
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2019-09-26more like thismore than 2019-09-26
answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept id 29 more like this
answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept sort name Work and Pensions remove filter
hansard heading Universal Credit: Payments more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate he has made of the effect of ending the five week wait for the first universal credit payment on (a) levels of poverty and (b) the public purse. more like this
tabling member constituency Airdrie and Shotts remove filter
tabling member printed
Neil Gray more like this
uin 291450 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-10-01more like thismore than 2019-10-01
answer text <p>Nobody has to wait for five weeks for a payment following an application for Universal Credit.</p><p> </p><p>Universal Credit new claim advances provide access to a payment for those in financial need, which can be accessed urgently, until their first regular Universal Credit payment is due. Claimants can access up to 100% of the total expected monthly award, which they can pay back over a period of up to 12 months. We have announced that from October 2021, the repayment period for these advances will be extended further, to 16 months.</p><p> </p><p>The Department has delivered a number of improvements to support claimants during their first assessment period, such as removing waiting days and paying those claimants moving from Housing Benefit onto Universal Credit a two week ‘transitional housing payment’. We are also introducing a two-week run on for eligible claimants of Income Support, Jobseeker’s Allowance and Employment and Support Allowance from July 2020.</p><p> </p><p>Assessment periods align to the way the majority of employees are paid, and how utility companies and other service providers collect payments. This allows Universal Credit to be adjusted each month, which means that if a claimant’s income falls they will not have to wait several months for a rise in their Universal Credit.</p>
answering member constituency Colchester more like this
answering member printed Will Quince more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-10-01T13:58:32.59Zmore like thismore than 2019-10-01T13:58:32.59Z
answering member
4423
label Biography information for Will Quince more like this
tabling member
4365
label Biography information for Neil Gray more like this
1151482
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2019-10-22more like thismore than 2019-10-22
answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept id 29 more like this
answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept sort name Work and Pensions remove filter
hansard heading Universal Credit more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps she is taking in response to the findings of her Department's In-work progression trial: further impact assessment and cost benefit analysis report dated 11 October 2019. more like this
tabling member constituency Airdrie and Shotts remove filter
tabling member printed
Neil Gray more like this
uin 3703 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-10-28more like thismore than 2019-10-28
answer text <p>Since 2010 we have seen over 3.7 million more people in work; two thirds of them in higher-skilled, higher paid roles. But, the Department wants to ensure everyone has a chance to move to higher paid work, which is why we ran this trial to learn more about what interventions could work. We will examine the outcomes as we develop our policies further to help boost their earnings.</p><p> </p><p>The evaluation of the trial showed small but sustained impacts for those receiving the most support, and it also shows these interventions may be cost effective.</p><p> </p><p>These results are promising, but there is still more work to do to increase our knowledge of What Works. The Department is currently in the second year of a four-year programme, announced in the Autumn Budget 2017, to deliver programme of research and analysis, and run a suite of tests and trials, working in partnership with other Government Departments and external organisations. This includes research which seeks to understand the situations and support needs of our future in-work cohorts; a Rapid Evidence Assessment of international policies linked to in-work progression; and work which will support Jobcentre staff to help claimants to make good decisions around job-switching.</p><p> </p><p>The Department will be using the results of the trial, together with other research conducted in years 1 and 2 of this programme, to develop more targeted tests and trials to support the development of effective in-work services.</p>
answering member constituency Eastleigh more like this
answering member printed Mims Davies more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-10-28T13:56:52.733Zmore like thismore than 2019-10-28T13:56:52.733Z
answering member
4513
label Biography information for Mims Davies more like this
tabling member
4365
label Biography information for Neil Gray more like this
1151483
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2019-10-22more like thismore than 2019-10-22
answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept id 29 more like this
answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept sort name Work and Pensions remove filter
hansard heading Universal Credit more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to her Department's report entitled, In-Work progression trial: further impact assessment and cost benefit analysis, what the point-in-time progression measures were for the (a) 52- and (b) 78-week periods by (i) gender and (ii) self-reported ethnic background of trial participants. more like this
tabling member constituency Airdrie and Shotts remove filter
tabling member printed
Neil Gray more like this
uin 3704 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-11-04more like thismore than 2019-11-04
answer text <p>The 52-week In-Work Progression Trial Impact Analysis was published on 12<sup>th</sup> September 2018 on GOV.UK. In the trial, the Frequent support group had Work Coach appointments every fortnight, while the Minimal support group only ever had two appointments in total.</p><p> </p><p><strong>i) Gender</strong></p><p> </p><p>The 52-week point-in-time progression measure for males was an additional £4.21 per week for the Frequent support group relative to the Minimal support group. For females, the point-in-time progression measure was an additional £5.99 per week for the Frequent support group relative to the Minimal support group. These progression estimates were calculated from samples and the difference of £1.78 is not statistically significant. The conclusion is that there does not appear to be evidence of a difference in progression between genders.</p><p><strong> </strong></p><p>The 78-week point-in-time progression measure for males was an additional £1.34 per week for the Frequent support group relative to the Minimal support group. For females, the point-in-time progression measure was an additional £6.14 per week for the Frequent support group relative to the Minimal support group. Again, these estimates are based on samples and the difference of £4.80 is not statistically significant. The conclusion is that there does not appear to be evidence of a difference in progression between genders.</p><p> </p><p><strong>ii) Ethnicity</strong></p><p> </p><p>The Department holds some data about ethnicity. Of the self-reported ethnic backgrounds, 82% of trial participants were of a White background; 6% of participants were of a Black/African/Caribbean background; 5% were of an Asian background and 7% were made up of other ethnic backgrounds.</p><p> </p><p>The Department has not calculated ethnicity sub-group progression measures. The small sample sizes in all other ethnicity groups, with the exception of the White background group, means that any comparisons of progression would not lead to statistically robust conclusions.</p>
answering member constituency Eastleigh more like this
answering member printed Mims Davies more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-11-04T18:26:11.08Zmore like thismore than 2019-11-04T18:26:11.08Z
answering member
4513
label Biography information for Mims Davies more like this
previous answer version
2264
answering member constituency Eastleigh more like this
answering member printed Mims Davies more like this
answering member
4513
label Biography information for Mims Davies more like this
tabling member
4365
label Biography information for Neil Gray more like this
1151484
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2019-10-22more like thismore than 2019-10-22
answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept id 29 more like this
answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept sort name Work and Pensions remove filter
hansard heading Job Centres: Staff more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the (a) minimum, (b) maximum and (c) average caseload was for jobcentre work coaches in each constituency in the most recent period for which data is available. more like this
tabling member constituency Airdrie and Shotts remove filter
tabling member printed
Neil Gray more like this
uin 3705 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-10-28more like thismore than 2019-10-28
answer text <p>The information requested is not readily available to constituency level and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.</p><p> </p><p>The size of a Work Coaches caseload will vary as it is dependent on a number of factors, including the level of customer support required, the needs of the local labour market and the Work Coaches working pattern.</p><p /> more like this
answering member constituency Eastleigh more like this
answering member printed Mims Davies more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-10-28T14:07:19.63Zmore like thismore than 2019-10-28T14:07:19.63Z
answering member
4513
label Biography information for Mims Davies more like this
tabling member
4365
label Biography information for Neil Gray more like this
1151486
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2019-10-22more like thismore than 2019-10-22
answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept id 29 more like this
answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept sort name Work and Pensions remove filter
hansard heading Universal Credit: Disqualification more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the Government response to the Work and Pensions Committee’s Nineteenth Report of Session 2017–19, Benefit sanctions. HC1949, when her Department plans to publish its evaluation on whether the sanctions regime within universal credit is effective at supporting claimants to search for work; and what the reason is for the time taken to publish that evaluation. more like this
tabling member constituency Airdrie and Shotts remove filter
tabling member printed
Neil Gray more like this
uin 3707 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-10-30more like thismore than 2019-10-30
answer text <p>The Department will look to publish its evaluation by the end of 2019.</p> more like this
answering member constituency Eastleigh more like this
answering member printed Mims Davies more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-10-30T17:26:12.833Zmore like thismore than 2019-10-30T17:26:12.833Z
answering member
4513
label Biography information for Mims Davies more like this
tabling member
4365
label Biography information for Neil Gray more like this
1146581
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2019-09-26more like thismore than 2019-09-26
answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept id 29 more like this
answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept sort name Work and Pensions remove filter
hansard heading Food Supply more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps her Department is taking to prevent food insecurity after the UK leaves the EU. more like this
tabling member constituency Airdrie and Shotts remove filter
tabling member printed
Neil Gray more like this
uin 291446 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-10-04more like thismore than 2019-10-04
answer text <p>The Government has been clear that leaving the EU with a deal is its preferred option.</p><p> </p><p>The Government has put in place contingency plans for a range of exit scenarios. These contingencies ensure that DWP can continue to provide our vital services and that individuals will continue to be able to access DWP benefits and services on the same basis as they do now.</p><p> </p><p>The Government is committed to providing a strong safety-net through the welfare system. We continue to spend over £95 billion a year on benefits for people of working age. DWP continues to monitor the effects of EU exit on the economy. Rates of benefits continue to be reviewed in line with the relevant legislation for uprating.</p> more like this
answering member constituency North Swindon more like this
answering member printed Justin Tomlinson more like this
grouped question UIN
290576 more like this
291140 more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-10-04T10:15:06.767Zmore like thismore than 2019-10-04T10:15:06.767Z
answering member
4105
label Biography information for Justin Tomlinson more like this
tabling member
4365
label Biography information for Neil Gray more like this