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593399
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2016-07-19more like thismore than 2016-07-19
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name
star this property answering dept sort name
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Evans of Bowes Park on 20 June (HL697), whether the Student Loans Company records the nationality and country of domicile of individuals taking out student loans for higher education, and, if so, how many people took out loans in each year since 2010, broken down by nationality. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Wolf of Dulwich more like this
star this property uin HL1338 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2016-09-21more like thismore than 2016-09-21
star this property answer text <p>The Student Loans Company (SLC) records the nationality and domicile of individuals when they apply for student support. Domicile is based on the applicant’s residence in the years prior to starting their course, and is held as a region within the UK or as EU, rather than by individual country of domicile.<p>Eligibility for student support is based on residence. EU nationals, including non-European Economic Area (EEA) family members, are able to apply for a tuition fee loan if they have been resident in the EEA or Switzerland for the three years prior to the first day of the first academic year of their course. In addition, EU nationals who have been resident in the UK for five years (three years up to academic year 2016/17) and are resident in England prior to starting their course can also apply for maintenance support. EEA migrant workers and their family members, including those who are non-EEA nationals, who meet the residency requirements, are able to apply for both tuition fee and maintenance support. Non-EEA nationals may also be eligible for student support if they are granted refugee status, have been granted humanitarian protection, have acquired permanent residence in the UK, or have been in the UK for at least half their lives or for at least 20 years.</p><p> </p><p>The table below sets out SLC Management Information on the number of students paid either a full-time tuition fee or maintenance loan through the English student support system by declared nationality over the last five academic years.</p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td colspan="6"><p><strong>English and EU domiciled students paid full-time tuition fee or maintenance loans, by EU nationality (July 2016)</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td rowspan="2"><p><strong>Country of nationality</strong></p></td><td colspan="5"><p><strong>Academic Year</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2010/11</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2011/12</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2012/13</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2013/14</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2014/15</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Austria</p></td><td><p>460</p></td><td><p>520</p></td><td><p>590</p></td><td><p>600</p></td><td><p>710</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Belgium</p></td><td><p>480</p></td><td><p>500</p></td><td><p>610</p></td><td><p>690</p></td><td><p>790</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Bulgaria</p></td><td><p>2,780</p></td><td><p>3,570</p></td><td><p>4,080</p></td><td><p>4,750</p></td><td><p>4,670</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Croatia</p></td><td><p>30</p></td><td><p>20</p></td><td><p>20</p></td><td><p>50</p></td><td><p>120</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Cyprus</p></td><td><p>4,930</p></td><td><p>5,560</p></td><td><p>5,860</p></td><td><p>5,880</p></td><td><p>5,750</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Czech Republic</p></td><td><p>540</p></td><td><p>500</p></td><td><p>530</p></td><td><p>640</p></td><td><p>770</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Denmark</p></td><td><p>540</p></td><td><p>630</p></td><td><p>700</p></td><td><p>820</p></td><td><p>960</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Estonia</p></td><td><p>750</p></td><td><p>840</p></td><td><p>810</p></td><td><p>840</p></td><td><p>860</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Finland</p></td><td><p>550</p></td><td><p>580</p></td><td><p>590</p></td><td><p>680</p></td><td><p>770</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>France</p></td><td><p>2,700</p></td><td><p>2,720</p></td><td><p>3,120</p></td><td><p>3,580</p></td><td><p>4,060</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Germany</p></td><td><p>3,650</p></td><td><p>3,850</p></td><td><p>4,060</p></td><td><p>4,240</p></td><td><p>4,580</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Greece</p></td><td><p>1,660</p></td><td><p>1,930</p></td><td><p>2,240</p></td><td><p>2,530</p></td><td><p>2,850</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Hungary</p></td><td><p>660</p></td><td><p>790</p></td><td><p>1,270</p></td><td><p>1,600</p></td><td><p>1,820</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Ireland</p></td><td><p>2,400</p></td><td><p>2,360</p></td><td><p>2,260</p></td><td><p>2,400</p></td><td><p>2,730</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Italy</p></td><td><p>2,110</p></td><td><p>2,430</p></td><td><p>3,010</p></td><td><p>3,950</p></td><td><p>5,500</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Latvia</p></td><td><p>1,680</p></td><td><p>1,920</p></td><td><p>2,010</p></td><td><p>2,110</p></td><td><p>2,080</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Lithuania</p></td><td><p>3,680</p></td><td><p>4,610</p></td><td><p>5,110</p></td><td><p>5,510</p></td><td><p>5,460</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Luxembourg</p></td><td><p>10</p></td><td><p>10</p></td><td><p>20</p></td><td><p>30</p></td><td><p>40</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Malta</p></td><td><p>90</p></td><td><p>90</p></td><td><p>100</p></td><td><p>90</p></td><td><p>110</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Netherlands</p></td><td><p>1,700</p></td><td><p>2,010</p></td><td><p>2,460</p></td><td><p>3,030</p></td><td><p>3,400</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Poland</p></td><td><p>6,420</p></td><td><p>6,380</p></td><td><p>6,870</p></td><td><p>7,950</p></td><td><p>9,170</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Portugal</p></td><td><p>2,330</p></td><td><p>2,600</p></td><td><p>3,170</p></td><td><p>3,890</p></td><td><p>4,440</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Romania</p></td><td><p>2,970</p></td><td><p>4,060</p></td><td><p>6,920</p></td><td><p>7,920</p></td><td><p>8,510</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Slovakia</p></td><td><p>1,080</p></td><td><p>1,040</p></td><td><p>990</p></td><td><p>1,020</p></td><td><p>1,120</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Slovenia</p></td><td><p>70</p></td><td><p>70</p></td><td><p>70</p></td><td><p>100</p></td><td><p>110</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Spain</p></td><td><p>1,350</p></td><td><p>1,510</p></td><td><p>1,780</p></td><td><p>2,330</p></td><td><p>3,160</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Sweden</p></td><td><p>870</p></td><td><p>950</p></td><td><p>1,220</p></td><td><p>1,410</p></td><td><p>1,630</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>EU sub-total</strong></p></td><td><p><strong> 46,490 </strong></p></td><td><p><strong> 52,050 </strong></p></td><td><p><strong> 60,470 </strong></p></td><td><p><strong> 68,640 </strong></p></td><td><p><strong> 76,170 </strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p>United Kingdom</p></td><td><p>862,410</p></td><td><p>911,920</p></td><td><p>935,050</p></td><td><p>972,090</p></td><td><p>974,690</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Non-EU</p></td><td><p>24,040</p></td><td><p>24,610</p></td><td><p>26,840</p></td><td><p>29,600</p></td><td><p>29,870</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Unknown</p></td><td><p>10,570</p></td><td><p>5,570</p></td><td><p>3,930</p></td><td><p>2,550</p></td><td><p>2,060</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>Grand Total</strong></p></td><td><p><strong> 943,500 </strong></p></td><td><p><strong> 994,130 </strong></p></td><td><p><strong> 1,026,270 </strong></p></td><td><p><strong> 1,072,860 </strong></p></td><td><p><strong> 1,082,810 </strong></p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="6"><p><strong>Source</strong>: SLC Management Information</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="6"><p><strong>Notes</strong>: Nationality is collected during the application process for student support. Where nationality was not available, country of birth was used, if available. Figures have been extracted from the SLC Single Application View (SAV) database, which contains live administrative data on applications. The data are updated as re-assessments and new applications are made following the academic year. Therefore, figures will not necessarily match previously published payment figures, including those contained in the Statistical First Release ‘Student Support for Higher Education in England’, which relate to past and specified dates.</p></td></tr></tbody></table>
star this property answering member printed Viscount Younger of Leckie more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2016-09-21T15:32:19.823Zmore like thismore than 2016-09-21T15:32:19.823Z
star this property answering member
4169
star this property label Biography information for Viscount Younger of Leckie more like this
star this property tabling member
4347
unstar this property label Biography information for Baroness Wolf of Dulwich more like this
43015
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-03-13more like thismore than 2014-03-13
star this property answering body
Department for Communities and Local Government more like this
star this property answering dept id 7 more like this
star this property answering dept short name
star this property answering dept sort name
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many applications to dispose of statutory allotments have been (a) submitted, (b) approved and (c) rejected in each local authority area in each year since 2010. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Leeds Central more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Hilary Benn more like this
star this property uin 191956 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2014-05-14more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answer text <p> </p><p>Further to the Allotments Act 1925, applications for consent to dispose of allotment land are submitted to the Department by local councils (parish councils and principal authorities). The table below shows the breakdown of applications since May 2010.</p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td> </td><td><p><em>Granted</em></p></td><td><p><em>Withdrawn</em></p></td><td><p><em>Refused</em></p></td></tr><tr><td><p>May 2010- March 2011</p></td><td><p>18</p></td><td><p>6</p></td><td><p>0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2011-12</p></td><td><p>17</p></td><td><p>5</p></td><td><p>0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2012-13</p></td><td><p>15</p></td><td><p>2</p></td><td><p>1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2013-14</p></td><td><p>17</p></td><td><p>1</p></td><td><p>4</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2014-15 to date</p></td><td><p>1</p></td><td><p>1</p></td><td><p>0</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p>To place this in context, the Secretary of State granted 34 allotment disposals in 2007, granted 22 in 2008 and granted 18 in 2009, whilst only 2 were declined, which is a greater rate than under this Administration.</p><p>I observe that the rt. hon. Member has been quoted in the media attacking such consents. He would have been wiser however to have undertaken a closer examination of the 68 individual consents granted to the local councils since May 2010.</p><p>The table below provides some context to help explain why there was a reasonable case by the representative local bodies for changing the statutory status of the land.</p><p>In January 2014, my Department published <em>Allotment Disposal Guidance: Safeguards and Alternatives</em> replacing the previous guidance from 2002. The new guidance strengthens allotment protection, as the requirement for waiting lists to be taken into account must now be rigorously applied to all that council's waiting lists, not just the waiting list for the site to be disposed of. This aims to ensure that poorly maintained sites are not used to justify disposal. Ministers will be closely monitoring to ensure that this new guidance is followed.</p><p>Notwithstanding, I have taken the opportunity to analyse these previous cases in the table below. The National Allotment Society was consulted in every case, and nine out of ten decisions were consistent with advice from the National Allotment Society (where advice was given); the remaining cases where the advice diverged related to land not actually in use as allotments, requiring a judgement call on whether it was realistic to bring the land back into productive use.</p><p>Having analysed these approvals, I can note that half of the land disposed was not actually in use as allotments. Moreover, in every case where existing allotment plot holders were displaced, evidence from local authorities indicates that alternative plots were made available to them.</p><p>More new plots were proposed to be created and/or vacant sites proposed to be brought back into use than the number of proposed disposals of in-use allotment plots. Consequently, the statutory disposal process overseen by the Secretary of State since May 2010 should have resulted in an <strong>increase</strong> in allotment provision not a reduction. This reflects this Government's commitment both to supporting local communities grow their own food and to protecting important community assets.</p><p> </p><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency Bristol West more like this
star this property answering member printed Stephen Williams more like this
star this property grouped question UIN 196310 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-05-14T12:00:00.00Zmore like thismore than 2014-05-14T12:00:00.00Z
star this property answering member
1492
star this property label Biography information for Stephen Williams more like this
star this property attachment
1
star this property file name 2269 & 2521 Benn - Table.docx more like this
star this property title Allotments - Disposal Consents Granted more like this
star this property tabling member
413
unstar this property label Biography information for Hilary Benn more like this
31448
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-01-07more like thismore than 2014-01-07
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name
star this property answering dept sort name
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many non-UK EEA nationals had dependants eligible to receive child benefit where the dependant is (a) in the UK and (b) outside the UK on 1 January 2014; and how much has been paid in such a fashion in each of the last three years. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Leicester East more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Keith Vaz more like this
star this property uin 181673 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2014-05-14more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answer text <p>HMRC are not able to provide the information in the manner requested. HMRC do not record the nationality of the claimant receiving Child Benefit for children living in another member state.</p><p> </p><p>Published Child Benefit statistics provide annual estimates of the number of families and children claiming. The latest available (August 2012) show that there were 7.92 million families, responsible for 13.77 million children and qualifying young people receiving Child Benefit.</p><p>The main purpose of Child Benefit is to support families in the UK. Consequently, the rules generally do not provide for them to be paid in respect of children who live abroad.</p><p> </p><p>Nevertheless, Child Benefit is a family benefit under EC Regulation 883/2004. This regulation protects the social security rights of nationals of all member states of the European economic area, including the UK, and Switzerland when they exercise their rights of free movement under EU law.</p><p> </p><p>HMRC holds information on the number of Child Benefit awards under EC Regulation 883/2004. As at 31 December 2013, there were 20,400 ongoing Child Benefit awards under the EC Regulation in respect of 34.268 children living in another member state.</p><p> </p><p>This is a fall of 3,682 (15.3%) awards in respect of 5,903 (14.7%) fewer children since 31 December 2012.</p><p> </p><p>The breakdown by member state is as follows:</p><p> </p><p>*We have withheld the number where it is fewer than 5, as there is risk that the information could be attributed to an identifiable person, which would prejudice their right to privacy and would therefore be a breach of Principle 1 of the Data Protection Act.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Child Benefit</p><table><tbody><tr><td><p>Country of residence of children</p></td><td><p>Number of awards</p></td><td><p>Number of children</p></td></tr><tr><td> </td><td> </td><td> </td></tr><tr><td><p>Austria</p></td><td><p>23</p></td><td><p>37</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Belgium</p></td><td><p>75</p></td><td><p>140</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Bulgaria</p></td><td><p>186</p></td><td><p>245</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Croatia</p></td><td><p>*5</p></td><td><p>*5</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Cyprus</p></td><td><p>39</p></td><td><p>61</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Czech Republic</p></td><td><p>124</p></td><td><p>203</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Denmark</p></td><td><p>13</p></td><td><p>23</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Estonia</p></td><td><p>45</p></td><td><p>65</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Finland</p></td><td><p>12</p></td><td><p>23</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>France</p></td><td><p>789</p></td><td><p>1429</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Germany</p></td><td><p>283</p></td><td><p>495</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Greece</p></td><td><p>44</p></td><td><p>69</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Hungary</p></td><td><p>136</p></td><td><p>196</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Iceland</p></td><td><p>*5</p></td><td><p>*5</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Italy</p></td><td><p>156</p></td><td><p>273</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Latvia</p></td><td><p>797</p></td><td><p>1091</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Liechtenstein</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Lithuania</p></td><td><p>1215</p></td><td><p>1712</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Luxembourg</p></td><td><p>7</p></td><td><p>14</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Malta</p></td><td><p>15</p></td><td><p>22</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Norway</p></td><td><p>30</p></td><td><p>61</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Poland</p></td><td><p>13174</p></td><td><p>22093</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Portugal</p></td><td><p>202</p></td><td><p>309</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Republic of Ireland</p></td><td><p>1231</p></td><td><p>2505</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Romania</p></td><td><p>230</p></td><td><p>392</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Slovakia</p></td><td><p>692</p></td><td><p>1232</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Slovenia</p></td><td><p>11</p></td><td><p>21</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Spain</p></td><td><p>600</p></td><td><p>1019</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Sweden</p></td><td><p>49</p></td><td><p>95</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Switzerland</p></td><td><p>77</p></td><td><p>150</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>The Netherlands</p></td><td><p>142</p></td><td><p>288</p></td></tr><tr><td> </td><td> </td><td> </td></tr><tr><td><p>Totals</p></td><td><p>20400</p></td><td><p>34268</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>As announced in the 2014 Budget, to prevent EEA migrants claiming benefits they are not entitled to, the Government will increase compliance checks to establish whether EEA migrants meet the entitlement conditions to receive Child Benefit</p><p> </p><p>Under domestic law, in order to claim Child Benefit EEA Migrants must be present in the UK, ordinarily resident and have a right to reside in the UK and their children must live in the UK.</p><p> </p><p>The recent changes to migrants' access to benefits announced by the Government sends a strong message that the UK benefit system is not open to abuse, as well as deterring those who may seek residence in the UK primarily to claim benefits.</p><p>Strengthening compliance checks will help prevent EEA migrants from claiming, and continuing to claim, benefits they are not entitled to. Checks will be applied to both new claims and existing awards.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency Loughborough more like this
star this property answering member printed Nicky Morgan more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
183448 more like this
184509 more like this
191453 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-05-14T12:00:00.00Zmore like thismore than 2014-05-14T12:00:00.00Z
star this property answering member
4027
star this property label Biography information for Nicky Morgan more like this
star this property tabling member
338
unstar this property label Biography information for Keith Vaz more like this
33120
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-01-15more like thismore than 2014-01-15
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name
star this property answering dept sort name
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate by country of residence of the child he has made of the number of migrants residing in the UK who claimed benefits on behalf of children living abroad during 2013. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Rochester and Strood more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Mark Reckless more like this
star this property uin 183448 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2014-05-14more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answer text <p>HMRC are not able to provide the information in the manner requested. HMRC do not record the nationality of the claimant receiving Child Benefit for children living in another member state.</p><p> </p><p>Published Child Benefit statistics provide annual estimates of the number of families and children claiming. The latest available (August 2012) show that there were 7.92 million families, responsible for 13.77 million children and qualifying young people receiving Child Benefit.</p><p>The main purpose of Child Benefit is to support families in the UK. Consequently, the rules generally do not provide for them to be paid in respect of children who live abroad.</p><p> </p><p>Nevertheless, Child Benefit is a family benefit under EC Regulation 883/2004. This regulation protects the social security rights of nationals of all member states of the European economic area, including the UK, and Switzerland when they exercise their rights of free movement under EU law.</p><p> </p><p>HMRC holds information on the number of Child Benefit awards under EC Regulation 883/2004. As at 31 December 2013, there were 20,400 ongoing Child Benefit awards under the EC Regulation in respect of 34.268 children living in another member state.</p><p> </p><p>This is a fall of 3,682 (15.3%) awards in respect of 5,903 (14.7%) fewer children since 31 December 2012.</p><p> </p><p>The breakdown by member state is as follows:</p><p> </p><p>*We have withheld the number where it is fewer than 5, as there is risk that the information could be attributed to an identifiable person, which would prejudice their right to privacy and would therefore be a breach of Principle 1 of the Data Protection Act.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Child Benefit</p><table><tbody><tr><td><p>Country of residence of children</p></td><td><p>Number of awards</p></td><td><p>Number of children</p></td></tr><tr><td> </td><td> </td><td> </td></tr><tr><td><p>Austria</p></td><td><p>23</p></td><td><p>37</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Belgium</p></td><td><p>75</p></td><td><p>140</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Bulgaria</p></td><td><p>186</p></td><td><p>245</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Croatia</p></td><td><p>*5</p></td><td><p>*5</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Cyprus</p></td><td><p>39</p></td><td><p>61</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Czech Republic</p></td><td><p>124</p></td><td><p>203</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Denmark</p></td><td><p>13</p></td><td><p>23</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Estonia</p></td><td><p>45</p></td><td><p>65</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Finland</p></td><td><p>12</p></td><td><p>23</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>France</p></td><td><p>789</p></td><td><p>1429</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Germany</p></td><td><p>283</p></td><td><p>495</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Greece</p></td><td><p>44</p></td><td><p>69</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Hungary</p></td><td><p>136</p></td><td><p>196</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Iceland</p></td><td><p>*5</p></td><td><p>*5</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Italy</p></td><td><p>156</p></td><td><p>273</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Latvia</p></td><td><p>797</p></td><td><p>1091</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Liechtenstein</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Lithuania</p></td><td><p>1215</p></td><td><p>1712</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Luxembourg</p></td><td><p>7</p></td><td><p>14</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Malta</p></td><td><p>15</p></td><td><p>22</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Norway</p></td><td><p>30</p></td><td><p>61</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Poland</p></td><td><p>13174</p></td><td><p>22093</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Portugal</p></td><td><p>202</p></td><td><p>309</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Republic of Ireland</p></td><td><p>1231</p></td><td><p>2505</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Romania</p></td><td><p>230</p></td><td><p>392</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Slovakia</p></td><td><p>692</p></td><td><p>1232</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Slovenia</p></td><td><p>11</p></td><td><p>21</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Spain</p></td><td><p>600</p></td><td><p>1019</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Sweden</p></td><td><p>49</p></td><td><p>95</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Switzerland</p></td><td><p>77</p></td><td><p>150</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>The Netherlands</p></td><td><p>142</p></td><td><p>288</p></td></tr><tr><td> </td><td> </td><td> </td></tr><tr><td><p>Totals</p></td><td><p>20400</p></td><td><p>34268</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>As announced in the 2014 Budget, to prevent EEA migrants claiming benefits they are not entitled to, the Government will increase compliance checks to establish whether EEA migrants meet the entitlement conditions to receive Child Benefit</p><p> </p><p>Under domestic law, in order to claim Child Benefit EEA Migrants must be present in the UK, ordinarily resident and have a right to reside in the UK and their children must live in the UK.</p><p> </p><p>The recent changes to migrants' access to benefits announced by the Government sends a strong message that the UK benefit system is not open to abuse, as well as deterring those who may seek residence in the UK primarily to claim benefits.</p><p>Strengthening compliance checks will help prevent EEA migrants from claiming, and continuing to claim, benefits they are not entitled to. Checks will be applied to both new claims and existing awards.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency Loughborough more like this
star this property answering member printed Nicky Morgan more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
181673 more like this
184509 more like this
191453 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-05-14T12:00:00.00Zmore like thismore than 2014-05-14T12:00:00.00Z
star this property answering member
4027
star this property label Biography information for Nicky Morgan more like this
star this property tabling member
4049
unstar this property label Biography information for Mark Reckless more like this
34652
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-01-22more like thismore than 2014-01-22
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name
star this property answering dept sort name
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many citizens of other EU member states currently living in the UK receive child benefit. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Romford more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Andrew Rosindell more like this
star this property uin 184509 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2014-05-14more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answer text <p>HMRC are not able to provide the information in the manner requested. HMRC do not record the nationality of the claimant receiving Child Benefit for children living in another member state.</p><p> </p><p>Published Child Benefit statistics provide annual estimates of the number of families and children claiming. The latest available (August 2012) show that there were 7.92 million families, responsible for 13.77 million children and qualifying young people receiving Child Benefit.</p><p>The main purpose of Child Benefit is to support families in the UK. Consequently, the rules generally do not provide for them to be paid in respect of children who live abroad.</p><p> </p><p>Nevertheless, Child Benefit is a family benefit under EC Regulation 883/2004. This regulation protects the social security rights of nationals of all member states of the European economic area, including the UK, and Switzerland when they exercise their rights of free movement under EU law.</p><p> </p><p>HMRC holds information on the number of Child Benefit awards under EC Regulation 883/2004. As at 31 December 2013, there were 20,400 ongoing Child Benefit awards under the EC Regulation in respect of 34.268 children living in another member state.</p><p> </p><p>This is a fall of 3,682 (15.3%) awards in respect of 5,903 (14.7%) fewer children since 31 December 2012.</p><p> </p><p>The breakdown by member state is as follows:</p><p> </p><p>*We have withheld the number where it is fewer than 5, as there is risk that the information could be attributed to an identifiable person, which would prejudice their right to privacy and would therefore be a breach of Principle 1 of the Data Protection Act.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Child Benefit</p><table><tbody><tr><td><p>Country of residence of children</p></td><td><p>Number of awards</p></td><td><p>Number of children</p></td></tr><tr><td> </td><td> </td><td> </td></tr><tr><td><p>Austria</p></td><td><p>23</p></td><td><p>37</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Belgium</p></td><td><p>75</p></td><td><p>140</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Bulgaria</p></td><td><p>186</p></td><td><p>245</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Croatia</p></td><td><p>*5</p></td><td><p>*5</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Cyprus</p></td><td><p>39</p></td><td><p>61</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Czech Republic</p></td><td><p>124</p></td><td><p>203</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Denmark</p></td><td><p>13</p></td><td><p>23</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Estonia</p></td><td><p>45</p></td><td><p>65</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Finland</p></td><td><p>12</p></td><td><p>23</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>France</p></td><td><p>789</p></td><td><p>1429</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Germany</p></td><td><p>283</p></td><td><p>495</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Greece</p></td><td><p>44</p></td><td><p>69</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Hungary</p></td><td><p>136</p></td><td><p>196</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Iceland</p></td><td><p>*5</p></td><td><p>*5</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Italy</p></td><td><p>156</p></td><td><p>273</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Latvia</p></td><td><p>797</p></td><td><p>1091</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Liechtenstein</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Lithuania</p></td><td><p>1215</p></td><td><p>1712</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Luxembourg</p></td><td><p>7</p></td><td><p>14</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Malta</p></td><td><p>15</p></td><td><p>22</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Norway</p></td><td><p>30</p></td><td><p>61</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Poland</p></td><td><p>13174</p></td><td><p>22093</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Portugal</p></td><td><p>202</p></td><td><p>309</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Republic of Ireland</p></td><td><p>1231</p></td><td><p>2505</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Romania</p></td><td><p>230</p></td><td><p>392</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Slovakia</p></td><td><p>692</p></td><td><p>1232</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Slovenia</p></td><td><p>11</p></td><td><p>21</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Spain</p></td><td><p>600</p></td><td><p>1019</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Sweden</p></td><td><p>49</p></td><td><p>95</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Switzerland</p></td><td><p>77</p></td><td><p>150</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>The Netherlands</p></td><td><p>142</p></td><td><p>288</p></td></tr><tr><td> </td><td> </td><td> </td></tr><tr><td><p>Totals</p></td><td><p>20400</p></td><td><p>34268</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>As announced in the 2014 Budget, to prevent EEA migrants claiming benefits they are not entitled to, the Government will increase compliance checks to establish whether EEA migrants meet the entitlement conditions to receive Child Benefit</p><p> </p><p>Under domestic law, in order to claim Child Benefit EEA Migrants must be present in the UK, ordinarily resident and have a right to reside in the UK and their children must live in the UK.</p><p> </p><p>The recent changes to migrants' access to benefits announced by the Government sends a strong message that the UK benefit system is not open to abuse, as well as deterring those who may seek residence in the UK primarily to claim benefits.</p><p>Strengthening compliance checks will help prevent EEA migrants from claiming, and continuing to claim, benefits they are not entitled to. Checks will be applied to both new claims and existing awards.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency Loughborough more like this
star this property answering member printed Nicky Morgan more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
181673 more like this
183448 more like this
191453 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-05-14T12:00:00.00Zmore like thismore than 2014-05-14T12:00:00.00Z
star this property answering member
4027
star this property label Biography information for Nicky Morgan more like this
star this property tabling member
1447
unstar this property label Biography information for Andrew Rosindell more like this
42610
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-03-11more like thismore than 2014-03-11
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name
star this property answering dept sort name
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many migrants from EU countries living in the UK receive child benefit. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Romford more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Andrew Rosindell more like this
star this property uin 191453 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2014-05-14more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answer text <p>HMRC are not able to provide the information in the manner requested. HMRC do not record the nationality of the claimant receiving Child Benefit for children living in another member state.</p><p> </p><p>Published Child Benefit statistics provide annual estimates of the number of families and children claiming. The latest available (August 2012) show that there were 7.92 million families, responsible for 13.77 million children and qualifying young people receiving Child Benefit.</p><p>The main purpose of Child Benefit is to support families in the UK. Consequently, the rules generally do not provide for them to be paid in respect of children who live abroad.</p><p> </p><p>Nevertheless, Child Benefit is a family benefit under EC Regulation 883/2004. This regulation protects the social security rights of nationals of all member states of the European economic area, including the UK, and Switzerland when they exercise their rights of free movement under EU law.</p><p> </p><p>HMRC holds information on the number of Child Benefit awards under EC Regulation 883/2004. As at 31 December 2013, there were 20,400 ongoing Child Benefit awards under the EC Regulation in respect of 34.268 children living in another member state.</p><p> </p><p>This is a fall of 3,682 (15.3%) awards in respect of 5,903 (14.7%) fewer children since 31 December 2012.</p><p> </p><p>The breakdown by member state is as follows:</p><p> </p><p>*We have withheld the number where it is fewer than 5, as there is risk that the information could be attributed to an identifiable person, which would prejudice their right to privacy and would therefore be a breach of Principle 1 of the Data Protection Act.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Child Benefit</p><table><tbody><tr><td><p>Country of residence of children</p></td><td><p>Number of awards</p></td><td><p>Number of children</p></td></tr><tr><td> </td><td> </td><td> </td></tr><tr><td><p>Austria</p></td><td><p>23</p></td><td><p>37</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Belgium</p></td><td><p>75</p></td><td><p>140</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Bulgaria</p></td><td><p>186</p></td><td><p>245</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Croatia</p></td><td><p>*5</p></td><td><p>*5</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Cyprus</p></td><td><p>39</p></td><td><p>61</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Czech Republic</p></td><td><p>124</p></td><td><p>203</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Denmark</p></td><td><p>13</p></td><td><p>23</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Estonia</p></td><td><p>45</p></td><td><p>65</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Finland</p></td><td><p>12</p></td><td><p>23</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>France</p></td><td><p>789</p></td><td><p>1429</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Germany</p></td><td><p>283</p></td><td><p>495</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Greece</p></td><td><p>44</p></td><td><p>69</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Hungary</p></td><td><p>136</p></td><td><p>196</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Iceland</p></td><td><p>*5</p></td><td><p>*5</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Italy</p></td><td><p>156</p></td><td><p>273</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Latvia</p></td><td><p>797</p></td><td><p>1091</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Liechtenstein</p></td><td><p>0</p></td><td><p>0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Lithuania</p></td><td><p>1215</p></td><td><p>1712</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Luxembourg</p></td><td><p>7</p></td><td><p>14</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Malta</p></td><td><p>15</p></td><td><p>22</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Norway</p></td><td><p>30</p></td><td><p>61</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Poland</p></td><td><p>13174</p></td><td><p>22093</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Portugal</p></td><td><p>202</p></td><td><p>309</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Republic of Ireland</p></td><td><p>1231</p></td><td><p>2505</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Romania</p></td><td><p>230</p></td><td><p>392</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Slovakia</p></td><td><p>692</p></td><td><p>1232</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Slovenia</p></td><td><p>11</p></td><td><p>21</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Spain</p></td><td><p>600</p></td><td><p>1019</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Sweden</p></td><td><p>49</p></td><td><p>95</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Switzerland</p></td><td><p>77</p></td><td><p>150</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>The Netherlands</p></td><td><p>142</p></td><td><p>288</p></td></tr><tr><td> </td><td> </td><td> </td></tr><tr><td><p>Totals</p></td><td><p>20400</p></td><td><p>34268</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>As announced in the 2014 Budget, to prevent EEA migrants claiming benefits they are not entitled to, the Government will increase compliance checks to establish whether EEA migrants meet the entitlement conditions to receive Child Benefit</p><p> </p><p>Under domestic law, in order to claim Child Benefit EEA Migrants must be present in the UK, ordinarily resident and have a right to reside in the UK and their children must live in the UK.</p><p> </p><p>The recent changes to migrants' access to benefits announced by the Government sends a strong message that the UK benefit system is not open to abuse, as well as deterring those who may seek residence in the UK primarily to claim benefits.</p><p>Strengthening compliance checks will help prevent EEA migrants from claiming, and continuing to claim, benefits they are not entitled to. Checks will be applied to both new claims and existing awards.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency Loughborough more like this
star this property answering member printed Nicky Morgan more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
181673 more like this
183448 more like this
184509 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-05-14T12:00:00.00Zmore like thismore than 2014-05-14T12:00:00.00Z
star this property answering member
4027
star this property label Biography information for Nicky Morgan more like this
star this property tabling member
1447
unstar this property label Biography information for Andrew Rosindell more like this
41185
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-03-04more like thismore than 2014-03-04
star this property answering body
Ministry of Defence more like this
star this property answering dept id 11 more like this
star this property answering dept short name
star this property answering dept sort name
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the objectives are of Britain's Defence and Security Strategy. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Mid Sussex more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Nicholas Soames more like this
star this property uin 190480 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2014-05-14more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answer text <p>The National Security Strategy defines two strategic objectives. These are firstly to ensure a secure and resilient UK – protecting our people, economy, infrastructure, territory and way of life from all major risks that can affect us directly – and secondly, shaping a stable world – acting to reduce the likelihood of risks affecting the UK or our interests overseas. Taken together, the National Security Strategy and Strategic Defence and Security Review define the ends, ways and means through which Government seeks to strengthen our security and build our prosperity.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Runnymede and Weybridge more like this
star this property answering member printed Mr Philip Hammond more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-05-14T12:00:00.00Zmore like thismore than 2014-05-14T12:00:00.00Z
star this property answering member
105
star this property label Biography information for Mr Philip Hammond more like this
star this property tabling member
116
unstar this property label Biography information for Sir Nicholas Soames more like this
388444
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-07-08more like thismore than 2015-07-08
star this property answering body
The Lord Chairman of Committees more like this
star this property answering dept id 200 more like this
star this property answering dept short name
star this property answering dept sort name Chairman of Committees (HoL) more like this
star this property hansard heading All Party Groups more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask the Chairman of Committees what role the House of Lords authorities had in agreeing the new rules for All-Party Parliamentary Groups issued by the House of Commons Committee on Standards to take effect at the start of the Parliament. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Hunt of Kings Heath more like this
star this property uin HL1219 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2015-07-23more like thismore than 2015-07-23
star this property answer text <p>In June 2012 a working group established by the Speaker of the House of Commons and the Lord Speaker reported on the operation and funding of all-party groups. The working group had three members of the House on it. It heard from the then chairman of the House of Lords Sub-Committee on Lords’ Conduct; conducted an email survey of members of the House; and held a discussion meeting open to all members of the House.</p><p>Following the working group’s report the House of Commons Committee on Standards began an inquiry into all-party groups, taking its first evidence in June 2013. In view of concern that the inquiry had yet to hear from any member of the Lords, in July 2013 the Lord Speaker wrote to the party whips and the Convenor of the Crossbench peers to alert them to the inquiry and the fact that members of the House of Lords were entitled to make submissions.</p><p>Shortly before the Standards Committee’s report on All-Party Parliamentary Groups was published in November 2013 the chair of that committee wrote to the Lord Speaker alerting her to its emerging thinking and enclosing the new rules which that committee was proposing. The Committee’s report, and the proposed new rules, were agreed by the House of Commons on 13 May 2014.</p><p>Since the House of Commons passed the first resolution regulating all-party groups in 1985, decisions on the rules for all-party groups have been for the House of Commons. The Register of All-Party Groups is maintained by the House of Commons Registrar and complaints of breach of the rules are investigated by the House of Commons Commissioner for Standards.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Sewel more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-07-23T11:19:15.787Zmore like thismore than 2015-07-23T11:19:15.787Z
star this property answering member
2124
star this property label Biography information for Lord Sewel more like this
star this property tabling member
2024
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Hunt of Kings Heath more like this
388445
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-07-08more like thismore than 2015-07-08
star this property answering body
The Lord Chairman of Committees more like this
star this property answering dept id 200 more like this
star this property answering dept short name
star this property answering dept sort name Chairman of Committees (HoL) more like this
star this property hansard heading All Party Groups more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask the Chairman of Committees what discussions have taken place between the House of Lords authorities and the Speaker of the House of Commons about the decision that only MPs can chair All-Party Parliamentary Groups. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Hunt of Kings Heath more like this
star this property uin HL1220 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2015-07-23more like thismore than 2015-07-23
star this property answer text <p>No representations have been made by the House of Lords authorities to the Speaker of the House of Commons about the decision that only MPs can chair All-Party Parliamentary Groups. Since the House of Commons passed the first resolution regulating all-party groups in 1985, decisions on the rules for all-party groups have been for the House of Commons. The Register of All-Party Groups is maintained by the House of Commons Registrar and complaints of breach of the rules are investigated by the House of Commons Commissioner for Standards.</p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Sewel more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-07-23T11:18:34.413Zmore like thismore than 2015-07-23T11:18:34.413Z
star this property answering member
2124
star this property label Biography information for Lord Sewel more like this
star this property tabling member
2024
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Hunt of Kings Heath more like this
389190
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-07-13more like thismore than 2015-07-13
star this property answering body
The Lord Chairman of Committees more like this
star this property answering dept id 200 more like this
star this property answering dept short name
star this property answering dept sort name Chairman of Committees (HoL) more like this
star this property hansard heading Political Parties: Finance more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask the Chairman of Committees how much Cranborne money will be given to (1) the Liberal Democrat Party, and (2) the Labour Party; and over what period of time. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Pearson of Rannoch more like this
star this property uin HL1376 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2015-07-20more like thismore than 2015-07-20
star this property answer text <p>The maximum amount of financial assistance available to opposition parties will be: £259,357 to the Liberal Democrat party in the period 8 May 2015 to 31 March 2016; and £577,871 to the Labour Party in the period 1 April 2015 to 31 March 2016. The amount given may be less, depending on claims.</p><p>For each subsequent year, the maximum amount for the previous year is increased by the percentage (if any) by which the retail prices index for the previous March has increased compared with the index for the March before that, and (if the resulting amount is not a whole number of pounds) rounded to the nearest pound. The full-year equivalents on which the calculation will be based are £288,525 for the Liberal Democrat party and the amount set out above for the Labour party.</p><p>Financial assistance is available to assist the Opposition, the second largest opposition party and the Convenor of the Cross-Bench Peers in carrying out their Parliamentary business.</p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Sewel more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-07-20T12:17:38.287Zmore like thismore than 2015-07-20T12:17:38.287Z
star this property answering member
2124
star this property label Biography information for Lord Sewel more like this
star this property tabling member
3153
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Pearson of Rannoch more like this