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1128813
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property answer text <p>I have asked IPSA to reply.</p><p>As the system is new, IPSA continue to work closely with MPs and their staff to help them understand how IPSA Online works, and how to realise the full benefits. We are continuing to hold group and one-to-one training in Parliament and have staff available on the phone to answer queries. IPSA are conducting a survey to gather more feedback about the new system, with plans for further improvements in due course. IPSA will report to the Speaker’s Committee for the IPSA later in the year on the overall costs and benefits of IPSA Online.</p><p>During the development of the new system, IPSA Online, IPSA carried out usability testing to look at how long a range of tasks and functions would take, compared with the old claims system. Based on this testing, IPSA found that improvements in the new system would take MPs and their staff about 30 per cent less time, due to the simplification of processes and forms. Feedback collected at training sessions also indicated that MPs’ staff expected IPSA Online to be easier and quicker to use than the old system.</p><p>MPs and their staff members will also benefit from the following time-saving changes:</p><p>- ‘Single sign-on’ capability enables MPs and their staff to access IPSA Online directly through their secure parliamentary account without an additional logon.</p><p>- The new system allows claims from different budgets to be submitted on the same form, rather than having to submit multiple forms.</p><p>- Because MPs and staff no longer need to send paper receipts and invoices to IPSA, but can scan or photograph them and upload them digitally onto the system, we can process and reimburse claims more quickly.</p><p>- Staff members can now be reimbursed directly by IPSA for their own expenses, so that MPs no longer need to wait to pay staff once they themselves have been reimbursed.</p><p>- Additional information is available to them directly, for example on the amounts left in budgets and the status of any repayments or amounts owed, so MPs and their staff no longer need to wait for a monthly financial statement or contact IPSA staff to ask about these issues.</p><p>- MPs and their staff are now able to amend their personal details, including any change of name or address, on the new system themselves, without needing to submit a form to IPSA</p>
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remove maximum value filtermore like thismore than 2019-06-13T14:53:00.463Z
star this property tabling member
318
unstar this property label Biography information for John Spellar more like this
1131249
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property answer text <p>The economic effect on churches and vicarages of the ban on the use of house coal has been negligible.</p><p> </p><p>Bishops’ see houses and vicarages have not used house coal for many years and the Church Commissioners are not aware of any churches that still use coal as a form of heating.</p><p>The Church of England supports the aim of the Government to improve air quality and public health; the Church has launched several initiatives to support this policy, which include planting more trees on its properties and encouraging churches to increase the biodiversity of their churchyards and green spaces.</p><p> </p> more like this
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less than 2019-06-13T13:54:40.053Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-13T13:54:40.053Z
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1565
unstar this property label Biography information for Philip Davies more like this
1131076
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property answer text <p>The Church Commissioners hold 12,333.67 hectares of land in Scotland.</p><p> </p> more like this
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less than 2019-06-13T13:56:21.877Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-13T13:56:21.877Z
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4417
unstar this property label Biography information for Deidre Brock more like this
1130704
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property answer text <table><tbody><tr><td><p>The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) does not maintain a record of the average number of days taken from a report of rape to the police through to a decision to charge. Data is, however, held on the average number of days from submission of a rape case by the police to the CPS through to the date of the decision to charge. The CPS works closely with police colleagues to ensure that where individuals are charged, cases have been thoroughly investigated and individuals are properly charged and prosecuted so that the interests of both victims and perpetrators are protected and cases do not collapse mid-trial. The figures provided in the table below include the end to end timeliness from submission to the date of the decision to charge. This comprises of the time when the case was with both police and the CPS. <table><tbody><tr><td><p><strong>Financial Year</strong></p></td><td><p><strong> </strong> <strong>Average Number of Calendar Days </strong> <strong>Receipt to Decision to Charge</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Average Consultations per Suspect</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2010-2011</strong></p></td><td><p>32</p></td><td><p>1.71</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2011-2012</strong></p></td><td><p>33</p></td><td><p>1.74</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2012-2013</strong></p></td><td><p>34</p></td><td><p>1.69</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2013-2014</strong></p></td><td><p>40</p></td><td><p>1.66</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2014-2015</strong></p></td><td><p>55</p></td><td><p>1.65</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2015-2016</strong></p></td><td><p>53</p></td><td><p>1.66</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2016-2017</strong></p></td><td><p>67</p></td><td><p>1.80</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2017-2018</strong></p></td><td><p>78</p></td><td><p>1.97</p></td></tr></tbody></table></p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p>There are a number of reasons for the steady increase in the average number of days and average number of consultations per case since 2010/11. The number of consultations between CPS prosecutors and police investigators is important. Consultations allow for a close examination of the evidence thus ensuring the case is strong. Clearly, the more consultations that take place, the longer the time between receipt of the case and the decision to charge.</p><p> </p><p>Police are now encouraged to seek early investigative advice more often and in particular in rape and serious sexual offences cases. Early investigative advice helps to ensure that cases are thoroughly investigated and the evidence to be brought before the court is strong. As a result, fewer cases are dropped after the defendant has been charged. With the increase in early investigative advice, CPS is more often involved at an earlier stage in proceedings and this will invariably impact on the average number of consultations and overall timeliness.</p><p> </p><p>There has also been an increase in the complexity of rape cases investigated by the police. Investigations often involve large amounts of electronic material (social media, emails, text messages, video and photographs) which needs to be reviewed by prosecutors before a charging decision can be made. This also impacts on the average number of consultations and timeliness of the pre-charge stage of the case.</p><p> </p><p>CPS prosecutors work closely with police colleagues to build strong cases which can be brought before the courts. Increased complexity has been evidenced over time by the rise in the average number of consultations with the police. Since 2010/11, the number has increased from 1.71 to 1.98 consultations per case, a rise of 16%.</p><p> </p><p>Changes have now been made to the Casework Management System to provide for a more sophisticated level of reporting. In future, CPS will be able to report the timeliness for each individual consultation.</p>
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-13T08:28:06.887Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-13T08:28:06.887Z
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3915
unstar this property label Biography information for Gloria De Piero more like this
1123707
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction true more like this
unstar this property answer text <p><del class="ministerial">This information is not held centrally.</del><ins class="ministerial">Records held by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) show that in 1997 a total area of 119,977 hectares was held for smallholdings purposes by local authorities in England. Data on land held for smallholdings purposes by individual local authorities in 1997 is unavailable. A recent report published by Defra records that, at 31 March 2018, the total area of land held by 43 reporting smallholdings authorities in England was 89,020 hectares (for the whole estate), of which 83,600 hectares were let as smallholdings (for 40 reporting authorities).</ins></p> more like this
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less than 2019-05-03T10:26:49.43Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-03T10:26:49.43Z
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252
unstar this property label Biography information for Dr David Drew more like this
1130983
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property answer text <p>The department publishes information annually at national, local authority and parliamentary constituency levels on the number of pupils who are eligible for the pupil premium in the current financial year, as a result of their having been registered for benefits-based free school meals at any point in the last six years. Figures for the financial years between 2015 and 2019 are available on GOV.UK via the following links:</p><p>2015-16: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pupil-premium-2015-to-2016-allocations" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pupil-premium-2015-to-2016-allocations</a>.</p><p> </p><p>2016-17: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pupil-premium-conditions-of-grant-2016-to-2017" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pupil-premium-conditions-of-grant-2016-to-2017</a>.</p><p> </p><p>2017-18: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pupil-premium-conditions-of-grant-2017-to-2018" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pupil-premium-conditions-of-grant-2017-to-2018</a>.</p><p> </p><p>2018-19: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pupil-premium-conditions-of-grant-2018-to-2019" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pupil-premium-conditions-of-grant-2018-to-2019</a>.</p><p> </p><p>Statistics for Oxford East constituency show that between 2015-16 and 2018-19, the proportion of primary school pupils eligible for the pupil premium fell from 27.9% to 24.9%; and the proportion of eligible secondary school pupils fell from 40.3% to 36.7%.</p><p>Statistics for Oxford West and Abingdon constituency show the same pattern over this period: the proportion of primary school pupils eligible for the pupil premium fell from 14% to 12.5%, and the proportion of eligible secondary school pupils fell from 18.3% to 16.8%.</p><p>Statistics for Oxfordshire local authority show that between 2015-16 and 2018-19, the proportion of primary school pupils eligible for the pupil premium fell from 16.2% to 14.4%; and the proportion of eligible secondary school pupils fell from 19.5% to 18.1%.</p>
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-13T12:04:37.253Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-13T12:04:37.253Z
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4657
unstar this property label Biography information for Anneliese Dodds more like this
1130352
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property answer text <p>Ofsted is responsible for regulating and inspecting settings that provide both care and accommodation, such as children’s homes (including secure children’s homes) and fostering services, in which the majority of children in care are accommodated.</p><p> </p><p>Where it is judged to be in the child’s best interests, local authorities are also permitted to accommodate children in care and care leavers aged 16 or 17 in ‘other accommodation’. This includes a range of settings such as semi-independent units, supported accommodation, hostels, foyers and supported lodgings. These settings provide accommodation with either on-site or floating support. ‘Other accommodation’ settings can provide a useful stepping-stone for young people who are increasingly able to make decisions for themselves but are not fully ready for the challenges of maintaining an independent tenancy. As these settings provide support, rather than care, Ofsted does not regulate them.</p><p> </p><p>Where a local authority places a young person in unregulated provision, it must ensure that the accommodation is ‘suitable’. Suitable accommodation is defined in regulations, which state that, with regard to settings used to accommodate children in care the responsible authority should ensure that:</p><ul><li>the accommodation is suitable for the child in light of their needs, including their health needs;</li><li>it has satisfied itself as to the character and suitability of the landlord or other provider;</li><li>the accommodation complies with health and safety requirements relating to rented accommodation; and</li><li>it has taken into account the child’s wishes, feelings and education, training or employment needs in respect of the responsible authority, so far as reasonably practicable.</li></ul><p> </p><p> </p><p>Further advice on suitable accommodation is provided in the Children Act Volume 2 statutory guidance, a copy of which is available at the following link: <a href="https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/441643/Children_Act_Guidance_2015.pdf" target="_blank">https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/441643/Children_Act_Guidance_2015.pdf</a>.</p><p> </p><p>Where a local authority places a young person out of area in unregulated provision there are additional safeguards in place. These require the placing authority to inform the host authority of their intention to place a young person with a provider in the host authority’s area, before confirming the placement. This provides an opportunity to check whether the host authority is aware of any concerns about the setting. This requirement is designed to ensure that poor quality providers are identified and exporting local authorities stop placing children in them.</p><p> </p><p>It is a long-standing principle that the local authority that took the child into care is responsible for supporting them, whether they are placed in that authority or outside the area. This enables the local authority to take into account the full range of needs of the young person and to ensure that if meets all of those needs. Moving to a system of shared accountability could create confusion about who is responsible for providing which services and runs the risk that young people placed out of area are not properly supported by either local authority.</p>
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-13T13:51:27.353Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-13T13:51:27.353Z
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4356
unstar this property label Biography information for Angela Rayner more like this
1130351
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property answer text <p>Ofsted is responsible for regulating and inspecting settings that provide both care and accommodation, such as children’s homes (including secure children’s homes) and fostering services, in which the majority of children in care are accommodated.</p><p> </p><p>Where it is judged to be in the child’s best interests, local authorities are also permitted to accommodate children in care and care leavers aged 16 or 17 in ‘other accommodation’. This includes a range of settings such as semi-independent units, supported accommodation, hostels, foyers and supported lodgings. These settings provide accommodation with either on-site or floating support. ‘Other accommodation’ settings can provide a useful stepping-stone for young people who are increasingly able to make decisions for themselves but are not fully ready for the challenges of maintaining an independent tenancy. As these settings provide support, rather than care, Ofsted does not regulate them.</p><p> </p><p>Where a local authority places a young person in unregulated provision, it must ensure that the accommodation is ‘suitable’. Suitable accommodation is defined in regulations, which state that, with regard to settings used to accommodate children in care the responsible authority should ensure that:</p><ul><li>the accommodation is suitable for the child in light of their needs, including their health needs;</li><li>it has satisfied itself as to the character and suitability of the landlord or other provider;</li><li>the accommodation complies with health and safety requirements relating to rented accommodation; and</li><li>it has taken into account the child’s wishes, feelings and education, training or employment needs in respect of the responsible authority, so far as reasonably practicable.</li></ul><p> </p><p> </p><p>Further advice on suitable accommodation is provided in the Children Act Volume 2 statutory guidance, a copy of which is available at the following link: <a href="https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/441643/Children_Act_Guidance_2015.pdf" target="_blank">https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/441643/Children_Act_Guidance_2015.pdf</a>.</p><p> </p><p>Where a local authority places a young person out of area in unregulated provision there are additional safeguards in place. These require the placing authority to inform the host authority of their intention to place a young person with a provider in the host authority’s area, before confirming the placement. This provides an opportunity to check whether the host authority is aware of any concerns about the setting. This requirement is designed to ensure that poor quality providers are identified and exporting local authorities stop placing children in them.</p><p> </p><p>It is a long-standing principle that the local authority that took the child into care is responsible for supporting them, whether they are placed in that authority or outside the area. This enables the local authority to take into account the full range of needs of the young person and to ensure that if meets all of those needs. Moving to a system of shared accountability could create confusion about who is responsible for providing which services and runs the risk that young people placed out of area are not properly supported by either local authority.</p>
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-13T13:51:27.307Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-13T13:51:27.307Z
star this property tabling member
4356
unstar this property label Biography information for Angela Rayner more like this
1130530
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property answer text <p>The tables below show the number of providers that we allocated funds to in each of the funding years.</p><p> </p><p>Note that in 2014/15 and 2015/16, the Adult Skills budget was part of the Apprenticeship budget and allocated as such. The Adult Education Budget was created in 2016/17, separate from apprenticeships. For the years 2014/15 and 2015/16 therefore, the number of providers includes those with Adult Skills and Adult Apprenticeship allocations.</p><p> </p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td colspan="2"><p><strong>Adult Skills Budget and Adult Apprenticeship Allocations </strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>Funding Year</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Providers</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2014/15</p></td><td><p>923</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2015/16</p></td><td><p>947</p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td colspan="2"><p><strong>Adult Education Budget Allocations</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>Funding Year</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Providers</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2016/17</p></td><td><p>737</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2017/18</p></td><td><p>831</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2018/19</p></td><td><p>646</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p>
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-13T13:36:25.987Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-13T13:36:25.987Z
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4128
unstar this property label Biography information for Chuka Umunna more like this
1130529
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property answer text <p>The department has not conducted an assessment of adult literacy levels within the past 5 years.</p><p>We participate in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s (OECD) Survey of Adult Skills to assess our performance in literacy, which was last conducted in England and 24 other countries in 2011-12. Findings from the survey can be found at: <a href="http://www.oecd.org/skills/" target="_blank">http://www.oecd.org/skills/</a>.</p><p>The next Survey of Adult Skills will take place in 2021/22, with results available in 2023.</p> more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-13T13:21:40.323Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-13T13:21:40.323Z
star this property tabling member
4128
unstar this property label Biography information for Chuka Umunna more like this