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1006656
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>There are no plans to remove OneDrive from Members. A configuration change made to the OneDrive service designed to enhance parliamentary information security had an unintended impact on the ability of Members to use OneDrive. This change has now been reversed and we are grateful to the noble Lord and others for drawing this to our attention.</p> more like this
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less than 2018-11-20T15:31:59.637Zmore like thismore than 2018-11-20T15:31:59.637Z
unstar this property answering member 4148
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525
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Clark of Windermere more like this
1002183
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>The most recent official data on average length of family-related leave taken by parents is from the Maternity and Paternity Rights Survey in 2009, which collected data from parents of children born in 2008 across Great Britain.</p><p>This shows that in 2008,</p><ul><li>mothers took an average of 39 weeks of maternity leave, up from 32 weeks in 2006.</li><li>amongst fathers who took some paternity leave, 16% took more than two weeks, 50% took two weeks and 34% took less than two weeks of leave.</li></ul><p>This does not contain information on average weeks of unpaid Parental Leave, nor of Shared Parental Leave which was introduced in 2015.</p><p>Information on the amount of leave taken at the regional or local level is not available.</p><p>The full Maternity and Paternity Rights Survey 2009/10 Research Report can be found here:</p><p>https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/214367/rrep777.pdf</p><p>We are currently evaluating the Shared Parental Leave and Pay schemes. As a part of this, we are commissioning a new survey which will provide updated information. Subject to the progress of data collection, we anticipate publishing findings in Summer 2019.</p>
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less than 2018-11-20T16:43:25.83Zmore like thismore than 2018-11-20T16:43:25.83Z
unstar this property answering member 4487
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4491
unstar this property label Biography information for Vicky Foxcroft more like this
1006209
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>The National Living Wage (NLW) is applicable for those aged 25 or older and will increase in April 2019 to £8.21 per hour. This will see a full-time NLW worker’s earnings increase by over £2,750 compared to its introduction</p><p> </p><p>April 2019’s rate increase is following recommendations from the independent and expert Low Pay Commission (LPC). The detailed assessment made by the LPC in reaching this recommended rate will be found in their Autumn 2018 report, which will be published in due course.</p><p> </p><p>Additionally, the Low Pay Commission also provide recommendations on the youth-related National Minimum Wage (NMW) rates. In April 2019, the NMW for 21-24 year olds will rise to £7.70, the 18-20 year olds’ rate will rise to £6.15, the 16-17 year olds’ rate will rise to £4.35 and the Apprentices’ rate will rise to £3.90. The Low Pay Commission is asked to recommend these rates such that they do not damage the employment prospects of younger workers. Indeed, we have seen youth unemployment (16-24 year olds) decrease by 462,000 workers since 2010.</p>
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less than 2018-11-20T16:42:18.957Zmore like thismore than 2018-11-20T16:42:18.957Z
unstar this property answering member 4487
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1447
unstar this property label Biography information for Andrew Rosindell more like this
1002468
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>The requested information is not held centrally.</p><p>Information on schools and pupils is published at the annual ‘Schools, pupils and their characteristics’ statistical release:</p><p><a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/schools-pupils-and-their-characteristics-january-2018" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/schools-pupils-and-their-characteristics-january-2018</a>.</p><p> </p> more like this
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less than 2018-11-20T16:17:10.21Zmore like thismore than 2018-11-20T16:17:10.21Z
unstar this property answering member 4689
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4533
unstar this property label Biography information for Baroness Altmann more like this
1005793
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>The government takes seriously its role in promoting inclusion and equality in education settings and the Equality Act 2010 (together with Part 3 of the Children and Families Act 2014) is a foundation stone on which our special educational needs (SEN) and disability system sits. The Equality Act requires all schools (whether maintained or academy) to produce an accessibility plan. These plans are about ensuring that all aspects of school life are accessible to disabled pupils. The Act also requires local authorities to produce accessibility strategies with the same aims as the school-level plan, but with different coverage.</p><p>We have funded the Schools Development Support Agency, working with pdnet to deliver a contract to improve knowledge, skills and capability of the school workforce. Pdnet standards have been developed for the early years, schools and post 16 settings, along with level 1 training for schools raising awareness of physical disabilities. Further information about pdnet is available on <a href="http://pdnet.org.uk/" target="_blank">http://pdnet.org.uk/</a>.</p>
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less than 2018-11-20T15:59:49.557Zmore like thismore than 2018-11-20T15:59:49.557Z
unstar this property answering member 4113
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4412
unstar this property label Biography information for Dr Lisa Cameron more like this
1005794
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>The Department wants fair access to a good school place for every child and routinely keeps the school admissions system under review. In setting their admission arrangements, admission authorities must ensure the practices and the criteria used to decide the allocation of places are fair, clear, objective and comply with admissions law and equalities law.</p><p> </p> more like this
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less than 2018-11-20T16:43:21.457Zmore like thismore than 2018-11-20T16:43:21.457Z
unstar this property answering member 111
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4412
unstar this property label Biography information for Dr Lisa Cameron more like this
1005827
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>Ofsted has a duty to consider pupils’ behaviour and safety as part of its section 5 school inspections. While it is not Ofsted’s role to investigate individual cases, inspectors always look at exclusions on school inspections and ask head teachers about trends and reasons for exclusions. The issue of exclusion is also covered as part of the joint Ofsted/Care Quality Commission inspections of local authorities’ effectiveness in identifying and meeting the needs of children and young people who have special educational needs or disabilities. Inspectors will report on overall levels of exclusions, and may comment when there is a specific or recurring trend.</p> more like this
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less than 2018-11-20T16:05:31.15Zmore like thismore than 2018-11-20T16:05:31.15Z
unstar this property answering member 111
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4405
unstar this property label Biography information for Julie Cooper more like this
1005847
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>The Department has worked with organisations such as the James Dyson Foundation and the Royal Academy of Engineering to reform the design and technology (D&amp;T) A level, GCSE and curriculum. The content emphasises the iterative design processes at the heart of modern industry practice. There is also more mathematical and science content that students must use and relate closely to D&amp;T, and a much greater use of design equipment such as 3D printers and robotics. Under the new national curriculum, reformed in 2014, D&amp;T remains a compulsory subject in all maintained schools from Key Stage 1 to 3. Maintained schools are also required to offer it as a subject at Key Stage 4. Academies can use the national curriculum as a benchmark for what they teach. The D&amp;T GCSE counts towards the Progress 8 secondary accountability measure.</p><p>The new qualification will prepare students for further study and careers in design. To ensure the subject is taught well, the Department supports recruitment of D&amp;T teachers through bursaries of up to £12,000 for eligible candidates.</p><p>For post-16 students, the Government is introducing T Levels, based on learning from the best international examples. Once fully introduced, many of the new T Level programmes will focus on core science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) occupations, including in the engineering and manufacturing sectors. Designed by employers, T Levels will give students access to high quality technical study programmes, which will prepare them for employment and higher level study in STEM occupations.</p>
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less than 2018-11-20T16:02:20.573Zmore like thismore than 2018-11-20T16:02:20.573Z
unstar this property answering member 111
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1580
unstar this property label Biography information for Mr Edward Vaizey more like this
1005854
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>The Government is allocating an additional £400 million of capital funding to schools in 2018–19. This funding is in addition to the £1.4 billion of condition allocations already provided this year to those responsible for maintaining school buildings.</p><p> </p><p>The Department will publish a calculation tool by December that will enable schools to estimate their own allocation. Final allocations for all schools in England will be published in January. The Department expects an average size primary school to receive £10,000 and an average size secondary school to receive £50,000 from the £400 million investment.</p><p> </p><p>The additional funding will be allocated to: maintained nurseries, primary and secondary schools, academies and free schools, special schools, pupil referral units, non-maintained special schools, sixth-form colleges, and special post-16 institutions that have eligible state-funded pupils.</p><p> </p> more like this
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less than 2018-11-20T16:19:52.327Zmore like thismore than 2018-11-20T16:19:52.327Z
unstar this property answering member 111
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520
unstar this property label Biography information for Mr Stephen Hepburn more like this
1005904
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>The School Resource Management Strategy, published in August, sets out the support to help schools reduce their costs.</p><p> </p><p>The strategy includes direct routes to help schools make savings on the £10 billion non-staffing spend across England last year and ensure that money goes where it is needed. The package of support includes access to Government-backed deals that are helping schools save money on things they buy regularly, such as utility bills, printers and photocopiers.</p><p> </p><p>The Department recommends that schools visit our pages on Buying for Schools here:</p><p><a href="https://www.gov.uk/guidance/buying-for-schools" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/guidance/buying-for-schools</a>.</p><p>The Department also recommends the page on School Resource Management below to ensure they have access to the latest resources:</p><p><a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/supporting-excellent-school-resource-management" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/supporting-excellent-school-resource-management</a>.</p>
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less than 2018-11-20T16:29:50.407Zmore like thismore than 2018-11-20T16:29:50.407Z
unstar this property answering member 111
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4006
unstar this property label Biography information for Dr Matthew Offord more like this