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1130704
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-07more like thismore than 2019-06-07
star this property answering body
Attorney General more like this
star this property answering dept id 88 remove filter
unstar this property answering dept short name Attorney General more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Attorney General more like this
star this property hansard heading Rape: Prosecutions remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Attorney General, what the average number of days taken from a report of rape to a decision to charge was in each year since 2010. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Ashfield more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Gloria De Piero more like this
star this property uin 261501 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-13more like thismore than 2019-06-13
unstar this property answer text <table><tbody><tr><td><p>The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) does not maintain a record of the average number of days taken from a report of rape to the police through to a decision to charge. Data is, however, held on the average number of days from submission of a rape case by the police to the CPS through to the date of the decision to charge. The CPS works closely with police colleagues to ensure that where individuals are charged, cases have been thoroughly investigated and individuals are properly charged and prosecuted so that the interests of both victims and perpetrators are protected and cases do not collapse mid-trial. The figures provided in the table below include the end to end timeliness from submission to the date of the decision to charge. This comprises of the time when the case was with both police and the CPS. <table><tbody><tr><td><p><strong>Financial Year</strong></p></td><td><p><strong> </strong> <strong>Average Number of Calendar Days </strong> <strong>Receipt to Decision to Charge</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Average Consultations per Suspect</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2010-2011</strong></p></td><td><p>32</p></td><td><p>1.71</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2011-2012</strong></p></td><td><p>33</p></td><td><p>1.74</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2012-2013</strong></p></td><td><p>34</p></td><td><p>1.69</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2013-2014</strong></p></td><td><p>40</p></td><td><p>1.66</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2014-2015</strong></p></td><td><p>55</p></td><td><p>1.65</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2015-2016</strong></p></td><td><p>53</p></td><td><p>1.66</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2016-2017</strong></p></td><td><p>67</p></td><td><p>1.80</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2017-2018</strong></p></td><td><p>78</p></td><td><p>1.97</p></td></tr></tbody></table></p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p>There are a number of reasons for the steady increase in the average number of days and average number of consultations per case since 2010/11. The number of consultations between CPS prosecutors and police investigators is important. Consultations allow for a close examination of the evidence thus ensuring the case is strong. Clearly, the more consultations that take place, the longer the time between receipt of the case and the decision to charge.</p><p> </p><p>Police are now encouraged to seek early investigative advice more often and in particular in rape and serious sexual offences cases. Early investigative advice helps to ensure that cases are thoroughly investigated and the evidence to be brought before the court is strong. As a result, fewer cases are dropped after the defendant has been charged. With the increase in early investigative advice, CPS is more often involved at an earlier stage in proceedings and this will invariably impact on the average number of consultations and overall timeliness.</p><p> </p><p>There has also been an increase in the complexity of rape cases investigated by the police. Investigations often involve large amounts of electronic material (social media, emails, text messages, video and photographs) which needs to be reviewed by prosecutors before a charging decision can be made. This also impacts on the average number of consultations and timeliness of the pre-charge stage of the case.</p><p> </p><p>CPS prosecutors work closely with police colleagues to build strong cases which can be brought before the courts. Increased complexity has been evidenced over time by the rise in the average number of consultations with the police. Since 2010/11, the number has increased from 1.71 to 1.98 consultations per case, a rise of 16%.</p><p> </p><p>Changes have now been made to the Casework Management System to provide for a more sophisticated level of reporting. In future, CPS will be able to report the timeliness for each individual consultation.</p>
star this property answering member constituency South East Cambridgeshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-13T08:28:06.887Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-13T08:28:06.887Z
star this property answering member
4517
star this property label Biography information for Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property tabling member
3915
unstar this property label Biography information for Gloria De Piero more like this
984793
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2018-10-10more like thismore than 2018-10-10
star this property answering body
Attorney General more like this
star this property answering dept id 88 remove filter
unstar this property answering dept short name Attorney General more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Attorney General more like this
star this property hansard heading Rape: Prosecutions remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Attorney General, what changes have been made to CPS charging thresholds in cases of rape; and for what reasons such thresholds have been changed. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Birmingham, Hall Green more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Mr Roger Godsiff more like this
star this property uin 177584 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2018-10-18more like thismore than 2018-10-18
unstar this property answer text <p>There has been no change of approach or policy in how prosecutors should make charging decisions in rape cases. It has always been the case that decisions are made in accordance with the Full Code Test.</p><p>The growth in the volume of digital evidence is complicating the gathering and analysis of evidence. To address the increasing complexity of cases we have introduced new guidance to help police and prosecutors with reasonable lines of enquiry and communications evidence. The National Disclosure Improvement Plan sets out further measures to ensure the proper processes are followed.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency South Swindon more like this
star this property answering member printed Robert Buckland more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2018-10-18T09:32:25.25Zmore like thismore than 2018-10-18T09:32:25.25Z
star this property answering member
4106
star this property label Biography information for Robert Buckland more like this
star this property tabling member
304
unstar this property label Biography information for Mr Roger Godsiff more like this
756377
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-09-04more like thismore than 2017-09-04
star this property answering body
Attorney General more like this
star this property answering dept id 88 remove filter
unstar this property answering dept short name Attorney General more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Attorney General more like this
star this property hansard heading Rape: Prosecutions remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Attorney General, how many cases of alleged rape under the Sexual Offences Act 2003 were referred to the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) by police in each year since 2009-10; on how many occasions the CPS pressed charges for those cases in each of those years; and what the (a) average, (b) shortest and (c) longest period of time between referral and charging was for cases which (i) did and (ii) did not lead to CPS charges in each of those years. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Kingston upon Hull North more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Diana Johnson more like this
star this property uin 8464 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-09-19more like thismore than 2017-09-19
unstar this property answer text <p>The table below shows the volume and proportion of charged suspects in cases flagged as rape during each of the last seven available years.</p><table><tbody><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p>Volume</p></td><td><p>%</p></td><td><p><strong> Total no of cases referred </strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2009 - 10</strong></p></td><td><p>3,232</p></td><td><p>42.1%</p></td><td><p><strong>7,683</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2010 - 11</strong></p></td><td><p>3,387</p></td><td><p>41.7%</p></td><td><p><strong>8,130</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2011 - 12</strong></p></td><td><p>3,213</p></td><td><p>47.1%</p></td><td><p><strong>6,822</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2012 - 13</strong></p></td><td><p>2,889</p></td><td><p>53.5%</p></td><td><p><strong>5,404</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2013 - 14</strong></p></td><td><p>3,621</p></td><td><p>61.9%</p></td><td><p><strong>5,850</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2014 - 15</strong></p></td><td><p>3,648</p></td><td><p>59.2%</p></td><td><p><strong>6,159</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2015 - 16</strong></p></td><td><p>3,910</p></td><td><p>57.0%</p></td><td><p><strong>6,855</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="3"><p>(Data Source: CPS Case Management Information System)</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p>The CPS monitoring of cases involving offences of rape involves the application of a rape ‘flag’ to applicable cases that are recorded on the CPS’ electronic Case Management System (CMS). The CPS definition of rape covers any case where the following offences were considered pre-charge or were subsequently charged:</p><ul><li>Rape: Section 1 of the Sexual Offences Act 1956</li><li>Sexual intercourse with a girl under the age of 13: Section 5 of the Sexual Offences Act 1956</li><li>Rape: Section 1 of the Sexual Offences Act 2003</li><li>Rape of a child under 13: Section 5 of the Sexual Offences Act 2003</li><li>Sexual activity with a person with a mental disorder impeding choice: Section 30(3) of the Sexual Offences Act 2003</li><li>An attempt to commit any of the above offences under the Criminal Attempts Act 1981</li><li>Incitement or conspiracy to commit any of the above offences.</li></ul><p>No separate record of the shortest or longest time from the initial request from the police to the decision to charge is maintained on the CMS, nor is any record collated showing the average number of days taken when the outcome of the charging decision is not to prosecute or any other outcome.</p><p>Rape and serious sexual offences (RASSO) investigations can be highly complex in nature and typically involve the review of a large quantity of evidence. In the vast majority of cases suspects are on police bail prior to a charging decision being made by the CPS and where the police seek a charging decision in such circumstances the CPS cannot authorise charges until the Full Code Test set out in the Code is met. The timeliness of a charging decision is determined by two key factors: how quickly the police can complete the necessary enquiries; and how quickly the CPS can then review the evidence provided by the police and finalise the charging decision.</p><p>The CPS recognises the distress caused to both complainants and defendants by delays in the charging process and we are committed to improving the timeliness of charging decisions. One of the most significant steps that the CPS has taken in this regard has been to substantially increase the resourcing allocated to the specialist RASSO units around the country which prosecute these cases. Between July 2015 and May 2017 the number of RASSO prosecutors available to make charging decisions rose from 138 to 197. This increased resourcing has contributed to an improvement in the timeliness of charging decisions. The number of RASSO cases awaiting CPS charging advice for between 28 days and 3 months fell by over 46% between March 2016 and March 2017 from 489 to 263 cases. Latest provisional data for July indicates the numbers have fallen still further to less than 130.</p><p>The CPS is committed to achieving further improvements in timeliness and in May 2017 the RASSO Service Standards were launched. These Standards set out best practice for the management of pre-charge RASSO bail cases between CPS areas and their local police partners. The Standards provide a commitment on the part of the CPS to provide a review of a case within 28 days of submission from the police and sets out an escalation procedure for police colleagues to follow when this target is not met. The Standards also require CPS staff to be actively involved in securing updates from investigating officers where there are significant delays in the police investigation of RASSO cases.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Kenilworth and Southam more like this
star this property answering member printed Jeremy Wright more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-09-19T14:33:50.607Zmore like thismore than 2017-09-19T14:33:50.607Z
star this property answering member
1560
star this property label Biography information for Jeremy Wright more like this
star this property tabling member
1533
unstar this property label Biography information for Diana Johnson more like this
756372
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-09-04more like thismore than 2017-09-04
star this property answering body
Attorney General more like this
star this property answering dept id 88 remove filter
unstar this property answering dept short name Attorney General more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Attorney General more like this
star this property hansard heading Rape: Prosecutions remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Attorney General, how many times (a) victims have withdrawn support for a prosecution of an alleged rape under the Sexual Offences Act 2003 case and (b) the Crown Prosecution Service has decided not to continue with the prosecution of an alleged rape following the withdrawal of such support in each year since 2009-10. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Kingston upon Hull North more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Diana Johnson more like this
star this property uin 8428 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-09-18more like thismore than 2017-09-18
unstar this property answer text <p>The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) does not maintain a central record of the number of victims who have withdrawn support for a prosecution or the number of cases the CPS has then subsequently decided not to proceed with. This information could only be obtained by examining CPS case files, which would incur disproportionate cost.</p><p>However, while the CPS does not collect data on the number of victims who withdraw support for the prosecution, or cases which do not proceed following the withdrawal of such support, information is available to show the overall number of pre-charge decisions where a decision not to prosecute was made and unsuccessful prosecution outcomes that were flagged as rape. These outcomes can be disaggregated to show the volume and proportion that were due to victim issues, including retraction, where it was inappropriate to compel the victim, non-attendance at trial or where the evidence given did not come up to proof.</p><p>The CPS monitoring of cases involving offences of rape involves the application of a rape ‘flag’ to applicable cases that are recorded on the CPS’ electronic Case Management System (CMS). The CPS definition of rape covers any case where the following offences were considered pre-charge or were subsequently charged:</p><ul><li>Rape: Section 1 of the Sexual Offences Act 1956</li><li>Sexual intercourse with a girl under the age of 13: Section 5 of the Sexual Offences Act 1956</li><li>Rape: Section 1 of the Sexual Offences Act 2003</li><li>Rape of a child under 13: Section 5 of the Sexual Offences Act 2003</li><li>Sexual activity with a person with a mental disorder impeding choice: Section 30(3) of the Sexual Offences Act 2003</li><li>An attempt to commit any of the above offences under the Criminal Attempts Act 1981</li><li>Incitement or conspiracy to commit any of the above offences.</li></ul><p>The table below shows the volume and proportion of decisions not to prosecute due to victim issues in cases flagged as rape during each of the last seven available years.</p><table><tbody><tr><td colspan="2"><p><strong>Victim Issues</strong></p></td><td colspan="2"><p><strong>No Prosecution</strong></p></td><td colspan="2"><p><strong>Charged</strong></p></td><td rowspan="2"><p><strong>Total</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>Volume</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>%</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Volume</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>%</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Volume</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>%</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2009-2010</strong></p></td><td><p>291</p></td><td><p>3.8%</p></td><td><p>4,165</p></td><td><p>54.2%</p></td><td><p>3,232</p></td><td><p>42.1%</p></td><td><p><strong>7,683</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2010-2011</strong></p></td><td><p>299</p></td><td><p>3.7%</p></td><td><p>4,339</p></td><td><p>53.4%</p></td><td><p>3,387</p></td><td><p>41.7%</p></td><td><p><strong>8,130</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2011-2012</strong></p></td><td><p>190</p></td><td><p>2.8%</p></td><td><p>3,281</p></td><td><p>48.1%</p></td><td><p>3,213</p></td><td><p>47.1%</p></td><td><p><strong>6,822</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2012-2013</strong></p></td><td><p>113</p></td><td><p>2.1%</p></td><td><p>2,195</p></td><td><p>40.6%</p></td><td><p>2,889</p></td><td><p>53.5%</p></td><td><p><strong>5,404</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2013-2014</strong></p></td><td><p>158</p></td><td><p>2.7%</p></td><td><p>1,857</p></td><td><p>31.7%</p></td><td><p>3,621</p></td><td><p>61.9%</p></td><td><p><strong>5,850</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2014-2015</strong></p></td><td><p>189</p></td><td><p>3.1%</p></td><td><p>1,997</p></td><td><p>32.4%</p></td><td><p>3,648</p></td><td><p>59.2%</p></td><td><p><strong>6,159</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2015-2016</strong></p></td><td><p>181</p></td><td><p>2.6%</p></td><td><p>2,271</p></td><td><p>33.1%</p></td><td><p>3,910</p></td><td><p>57.0%</p></td><td><p><strong>6,855</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="4"><p>Data Source: CPS Case Management Information System</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p>Victim issues include cases where the victim is called as a witness in a trial, but fails to attend court; where the evidence of the victim supports the prosecution case but the victim refuses to be called as a witness, or retracts, or withdraws a complaint; and where the evidence of the victim does not support the prosecution of the defendant, leading to an unsuccessful outcome, but the victim however, has not retracted.</p><p>The CPS will shortly be publishing its annual Violence Against Women and Girls Report for 2016-17 which will provide the most up to date assessment of rape flagged prosecutions including the key reasons for unsuccessful prosecutions.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency Kenilworth and Southam more like this
star this property answering member printed Jeremy Wright more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-09-18T11:58:25.22Zmore like thismore than 2017-09-18T11:58:25.22Z
star this property answering member
1560
star this property label Biography information for Jeremy Wright more like this
star this property tabling member
1533
unstar this property label Biography information for Diana Johnson more like this
1132935
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-18more like thismore than 2019-06-18
star this property answering body
Attorney General more like this
star this property answering dept id 88 remove filter
unstar this property answering dept short name Attorney General more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Attorney General more like this
star this property hansard heading Rape: Prosecutions remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Attorney General, what proportion of reported rape cases in 2017-18 passed to the CPS by the police forces of England and Wales were returned to the police for further evidence to be gathered, and were not subsequently returned to the CPS with that further evidence. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Torfaen more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Nick Thomas-Symonds more like this
star this property uin 266233 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-24more like thismore than 2019-06-24
unstar this property answer text <p>The CPS recognises that rape and serious sexual offences have a significant and profound impact on victims. It is vital to ensure that cases are investigated thoroughly in order to bring them to justice. To achieve this, it is necessary in many cases to seek further information before a prosecutor is able to determine whether or not to charge. In such cases, an action plan requesting further evidence will be provided to the police by the CPS.</p><p> </p><p>When the Police are unable to respond to the action plan, the case is administratively finalised. This is an administrative process where cases are closed on the CPS’s Case Management System if, after reminders from the CPS, the Police do not submit further information. Such cases may be reopened if, at a later date, new material is provided to the CPS by the Police enabling them to decide whether to charge.</p><p> </p><p>The Police may also seek ‘early investigative advice’ from the CPS to assist in determining the evidence required for a charge. In these cases the CPS may also administratively finalise a case if after receiving CPS advice, the Police do not re-submit the case.</p><p> </p><p>In 2017/18, 22% of all rape cases referred to the CPS were administratively finalised.</p>
star this property answering member constituency South East Cambridgeshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-24T16:34:49.637Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-24T16:34:49.637Z
star this property answering member
4517
star this property label Biography information for Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property tabling member
4479
unstar this property label Biography information for Nick Thomas-Symonds more like this
756368
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-09-04more like thismore than 2017-09-04
star this property answering body
Attorney General more like this
star this property answering dept id 88 remove filter
unstar this property answering dept short name Attorney General more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Attorney General more like this
star this property hansard heading Rape: Prosecutions remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Attorney General, (a) how many specialist rape prosecutors were employed by the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) in each of the 42 CPS areas and (b) how much was spent on those prosecutors in each year since 2009-10. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Kingston upon Hull North more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Diana Johnson more like this
star this property uin 8431 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-09-12more like thismore than 2017-09-12
unstar this property answer text <p>The CPS currently operates across 14 geographical areas in England and Wales. Dedicated rape and serious sexual offences (RASSO) units were not introduced across the geographical areas until 2014. It is not possible for the CPS to provide reliable statistics with respect to prosecutor numbers working within these specialist units prior to 2015. Its records do show the number of prosecutors employed by the CPS in specialist RASSO units as at July 2015, June 2016 and May 2017.</p><p>Number of Prosecutors working in specialist RASSO units:</p><p>July 2015: 138</p><p>June 2016: 185</p><p>May 2017: 197</p><p>The CPS financial records have only recently split RASSO units into separate cost centres so it is not possible to provide the exact historical spend on RASSO prosecutors for each year. The headcount figures can be translated into an equivalent annual spend based on the average total payroll cost[1] of employing Senior Crown Prosecutors in each year. In 2015 the approximate cost of employing RASSO prosecutors was £9.3 million. In 2016 the approximate cost was £12.8 million and in 2017 it is estimated that the cost will be £13.8 million.</p><p>[1] Total payroll costs are inclusive of Employers National Insurance and Pension costs</p>
star this property answering member constituency Kenilworth and Southam more like this
star this property answering member printed Jeremy Wright more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-09-12T08:00:20.443Zmore like thismore than 2017-09-12T08:00:20.443Z
star this property answering member
1560
star this property label Biography information for Jeremy Wright more like this
star this property tabling member
1533
unstar this property label Biography information for Diana Johnson more like this
1133384
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-19more like thismore than 2019-06-19
star this property answering body
Attorney General more like this
star this property answering dept id 88 remove filter
unstar this property answering dept short name Attorney General more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Attorney General more like this
star this property hansard heading Rape: Prosecutions remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Attorney General, how many cases of alleged rape were referred to the CPS in each year since 2015-16, and in how many of those cases the CPS pressed charges in each of those years; and what the (a) average, (b) shortest and (c) longest period of time between referral and charging was for those cases. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Sheffield, Heeley more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Louise Haigh more like this
star this property uin 266848 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-24more like thismore than 2019-06-24
unstar this property answer text <p>Rape is a serious sexual offence which has a profound impact on victims. The CPS works closely with the Police to ensure that cases are thoroughly investigated before charges are brought because it is in the interests of both victims and perpetrators that cases do not collapse mid-trial.</p><p> </p><p>Cases involving rape and serious sexual offences are some of the most challenging, complex cases that the CPS deals with. They involve very little corroborative evidence in comparison with other cases, and this can result them taking longer to progress through the system. However, the CPS recognises that these offences are devastating crimes that have a significant impact on victims.</p><p> </p><p>The CPS maintains a record of the average number of days taken from referral through to a decision to charge. This data can be seen at annex A. However data is not held on the shortest or longest number of days from submission of a rape case by the police to the CPS through to the date of the decision to charge.</p><p> </p><p>There are a number of reasons for the steady increase in the average number of days and average number of consultations per case since 2015/16. Police are now more regularly encouraged to seek ‘early investigative advice’ to help determine what evidence is required for charge more often. Early investigative advice helps to ensure that cases are thoroughly investigated and the evidence to be brought before the court is strong. As a result, the CPS is more often involved at an earlier stage in proceedings which impacts on the average number of consultations and overall timeliness.</p><p> </p><p>There has also been an increase in the complexity of rape cases investigated by the police. Investigations often involve large amounts of electronic material (social media, emails, text messages, video and photographs) which needs to be reviewed by prosecutors before a charging decision can be made. This also impacts on the average number of consultations and timeliness of the pre-charge stage of the case.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency South East Cambridgeshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-24T16:48:06.56Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-24T16:48:06.56Z
star this property answering member
4517
star this property label Biography information for Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property attachment
1
star this property file name 266848 - Annex A.docx more like this
star this property title Annex A more like this
star this property tabling member
4473
unstar this property label Biography information for Louise Haigh more like this
1132928
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-18more like thismore than 2019-06-18
star this property answering body
Attorney General more like this
star this property answering dept id 88 remove filter
unstar this property answering dept short name Attorney General more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Attorney General more like this
star this property hansard heading Rape: Prosecutions remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Attorney General, what proportion of reported rape cases that were passed to the Crown Prosecution Service by the police forces of England and Wales were returned to the police for further evidence to be gathered in 2017-18. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Torfaen more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Nick Thomas-Symonds more like this
star this property uin 266227 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-24more like thismore than 2019-06-24
unstar this property answer text <p>Rape is a horrific crime which has a significant and profound impact on victims. It is vital to ensure that cases are investigated thoroughly in order to bring them to justice. To achieve this, it is necessary in many cases to seek further information before a prosecutor is able to determine whether or not to charge. This process ensures that cases are as robust as possible once they reach the court.</p><p>In 2017-18, cases were referred back to the Police for 61% of suspects in cases recorded as rape in the system. Whilst one situation where the CPS may refer a case back to the Police is to request further evidence, it could also be in instances when the Police have sought ‘early investigative advice’ from the CPS to assist in determining the evidence required for a charge. It is not possible to separate cases where the CPS has requested further evidence and when the Police have sought early investigative advice.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency South East Cambridgeshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-24T15:26:16.1Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-24T15:26:16.1Z
star this property answering member
4517
star this property label Biography information for Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property tabling member
4479
unstar this property label Biography information for Nick Thomas-Symonds more like this
1133866
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-21more like thismore than 2019-06-21
star this property answering body
Attorney General more like this
star this property answering dept id 88 remove filter
unstar this property answering dept short name Attorney General more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Attorney General more like this
star this property hansard heading Rape: Prosecutions remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Attorney General, how many and what proportion of cases of suspected rape were given a No Further Action as a result of insufficient evidence to proceed in each of the last three years. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Sheffield, Heeley more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Louise Haigh more like this
star this property uin 267760 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-26more like thismore than 2019-06-26
unstar this property answer text <p>Rape and serious sexual offences are devastating crimes that have a profound impact on victims, and are some of the most challenging and complex cases that the CPS deals with. Where evidence submitted by the Police is sufficient to bring charges, the CPS will not hesitate to prosecute these horrific crimes.</p><p> </p><p>The CPS maintains a central record to show the overall number of charging decisions where a decision has been made to take No Further Action in cases recorded as rape on the system. The data is shown below broken down by financial year:</p><p> </p><ul><li><p>In 2015-16, 31.5% of cases of suspected rape were not prosecuted due to evidential issues (2,162 cases)</p></li><li><p>In 2016-17, 31.2% of cases of suspected rape were not prosecuted due to evidential issues (2,061 cases)</p></li><li><p>In 2017-18, 29.7% of cases of suspected rape were not prosecuted due to evidential issues (1,786 cases)</p></li></ul> more like this
star this property answering member constituency South East Cambridgeshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-26T10:19:33.747Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-26T10:19:33.747Z
star this property answering member
4517
star this property label Biography information for Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property tabling member
4473
unstar this property label Biography information for Louise Haigh more like this
1130703
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-07more like thismore than 2019-06-07
star this property answering body
Attorney General more like this
star this property answering dept id 88 remove filter
unstar this property answering dept short name Attorney General more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Attorney General more like this
star this property hansard heading Rape: Prosecutions remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Attorney General, (a) how many and (b) what proportion of cases of rape reported to the CPS were administratively finalised in each year since 2010. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Ashfield more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Gloria De Piero more like this
star this property uin 261500 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-17more like thismore than 2019-06-17
unstar this property answer text <p>It is important to stress that ’administrative finalisation’ is not a prosecutorial decision. It is an administrative process where cases are closed on CPS’ electronic case management system. It does not necessarily mean the proceedings are at an end. Such cases may be reopened, if at a later date, new material is provided to the prosecution enabling a charging decision to be made.</p><p> </p><p>Proceedings are administratively finalised when:</p><p> </p><ul><li>The police seek early investigative advice from the CPS and did not resubmit the case to the CPS for a charging decision. In these instances, the case enters the CPS records but was never actually referred for a charging decision.</li></ul><p> </p><ul><li>The police do refer a case to the police but there is insufficient evidence to bring a charge, sothe CPS ask the police to complete an action plan in order to improve the evidence. If the police are unable to respond to the action plan or decide not to pursue the matter, then the case will be ‘administratively finalised’ on the CPS system because the police cannot bring forward a case with sufficient evidence to charge.</li></ul><p>There was a 9% reduction in referrals from the police between 2016/17 and 2017/18. During this period, the percentage of cases resulting in no further action remained largely unchanged. There was, however, a significant increase in both the volume and percentage of cases administratively finalised. This is largely because of internal CPS administrative processes, reminding users to ‘administratively finalise’ cases where the police had requested early advice but had not resubmitted.</p><p>This coincided with an increase in the number of cases where the police have not responded to early investigative advice or an action plan has resulted in a rise in the number of administrative finalisations.</p><p>The table below shows the outcome of all referrals from the police for a pre charge decision, and show both the volume and the rates of these outcomes</p><p>TABLE KEY:</p><p> </p><ul><li>Decision to charge: Prosecutors must be satisfied there is enough evidence to provide a &quot;realistic prospect of conviction&quot; against each defendant and that the prosecution is in the public interest.</li></ul><p> </p><ul><li>Take no further action: This is a prosecutorial decision based on an assessment that there is insufficient evidence to provide a “realistic prospect of conviction” or that a prosecution is not in the public interest. The case may be reopened if the police provide further evidence or the victim successfully appeals the decision under the victims right to review;</li></ul><p> </p><ul><li>Out of Court Disposal: Out of court disposals include a caution, conditional caution or the recommendation that the offence is taken into consideration with other charges;</li></ul><p> </p><ul><li>Other: the result of the charging decision is not known or has not been given for that suspect.</li></ul><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p><strong>Volumes &amp; Rates as %</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Charge</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>No Further Action</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Out of Court Disposal</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Admin Finalised</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Other</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Total</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2010-2011</strong></p></td><td><p>3,387 (42%)</p></td><td><p>4,339 (53%)</p></td><td><p>65 (1%)</p></td><td><p>321 (4%)</p></td><td><p>18 (0%)</p></td><td><p>8,130</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2011-2012</strong></p></td><td><p>3,213 (47%)</p></td><td><p>3,281 (48%)</p></td><td><p>42 (1%)</p></td><td><p>275 (4%)</p></td><td><p>11 (0%)</p></td><td><p>6,822</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2012-2013</strong></p></td><td><p>2,889 (53%)</p></td><td><p>2,195 (41%)</p></td><td><p>34 (1%)</p></td><td><p>281 (5%)</p></td><td><p>5 (0%)</p></td><td><p>5,404</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2013-2014</strong></p></td><td><p>3,621 (62%)</p></td><td><p>1,857 (32%)</p></td><td><p>23 (0%)</p></td><td><p>341 (6%)</p></td><td><p>8 (0%)</p></td><td><p>5,850</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2014-2015</strong></p></td><td><p>3,648 (59%)</p></td><td><p>1,997 (32%)</p></td><td><p>29 (0%)</p></td><td><p>484 (8%)</p></td><td><p>1 (0%)</p></td><td><p>6,159</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2015-2016</strong></p></td><td><p>3,910 (57%)</p></td><td><p>2,271 (33%)</p></td><td><p>24 (0%)</p></td><td><p>645 (9%)</p></td><td><p>5 (0%)</p></td><td><p>6,855</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2016-2017</strong></p></td><td><p>3,671 (56%)</p></td><td><p>2,145 (32%)</p></td><td><p>30 (0%)</p></td><td><p>761 (12%)</p></td><td><p>4 (0%)</p></td><td><p>6,611</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>2017-2018</strong></p></td><td><p>2,822 (47%</p></td><td><p>1,851 (31%)</p></td><td><p>26 (0%)</p></td><td><p>1,307 (22%)</p></td><td><p>6 (0%)</p></td><td><p>6,012</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p>Data Source: CPS Case Management Information System</p>
star this property answering member constituency South East Cambridgeshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-17T15:09:46.827Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-17T15:09:46.827Z
star this property answering member
4517
star this property label Biography information for Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property tabling member
3915
unstar this property label Biography information for Gloria De Piero more like this