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1133141
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2019-06-19more like thismore than 2019-06-19
answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept id 29 remove filter
answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
hansard heading Children: Maintenance more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps the Child Maintenance and Enforcement Commission is taking to retrieve money owed by absent parents. more like this
tabling member constituency Strangford more like this
tabling member printed
Jim Shannon remove filter
uin 266704 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-06-24more like thismore than 2019-06-24
answer text <p>The Child Maintenance Service (CMS) replaced the Child Maintenance and Enforcement Commission in 2012 and brought significant reforms to the Child Maintenance system in Great Britain. Child Maintenance in Northern Ireland is a devolved issue, although they run a broadly similar scheme. Any questions should be directed to the Department for Communities in Northern Ireland.</p><p> </p><p>We support separated parents to make their own family based arrangements wherever possible. This allows families to create flexible arrangements that work for their individual circumstances and, where parents are able to work together, this can be better for their children. Where this is not possible, the CMS offers an effective and efficient statutory scheme for those parents who really need it.</p><p> </p><p>Under the statutory scheme, where paying parents fail to pay on time and in full, we aim to take immediate action to recover the debt and re-establish compliance. Where compliance is not achieved we are committed to using our wide ranging enforcement powers proportionally, and in the best interests of children and separated families.</p><p />
answering member constituency Colchester more like this
answering member printed Will Quince more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-06-24T16:42:19.487Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-24T16:42:19.487Z
answering member
4423
label Biography information for Will Quince more like this
tabling member
4131
label Biography information for Jim Shannon more like this
1130974
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2019-06-10more like thismore than 2019-06-10
answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept id 29 remove filter
answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
hansard heading Retirement: Health more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps he is taking to help reduce the number of people over the age of 60 that have had to retire as a result of ill-health. more like this
tabling member constituency Strangford more like this
tabling member printed
Jim Shannon remove filter
uin 262373 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-06-18more like thismore than 2019-06-18
answer text <p>The Department set out its strategy to see one million more disabled people in work by 2027 in the 2017 Command Paper “Improving Lives: The Future of Work, Health and Disability”. A key element of this is action to help keep people (including older workers) with health conditions in work. We are already investing in testing new interventions to support people, including our Health-Led Trials, and the Government is working to ensure employers and key stakeholders across all sectors adopt and implement the core and enhanced mental health standards set out in <em>Thriving at Work: The Stevenson / Farmer review of mental health</em>.</p><p>To support older people falling out of labour market due to health conditions, the Government has extended the right to request flexible working for all employees with 26 weeks’ continuous service with their employer. Access to flexible working practices, such as flexi-time, compressed hours and remote working, is key to helping older workers stay in the labour market.</p><p> </p><p>We are also exploring further ways to reduce the number of people who leave work each year for health reasons and will consult on measures to encourage and support all employers to play their part. This consultation will also propose ways to improve access to occupational health.</p><p> </p><p><strong>Background</strong></p><p> </p><p>In February 2017 Government published an employer-led Strategy <em>Fuller Working Lives: a partnership approach</em>, which sets out the importance of Fuller Working Lives for employers and individuals. It also sets out action Government is taking to support older workers to remain in the labour market.</p><p> </p><p><em>Improving Lives: The Future of Work, Health and Disability</em> published in November 2017 set out an ambitious and comprehensive programme of action to support disabled people and people with long term physical and mental health conditions to get into and stay in work and progress in rewarding careers. This action spans the workplace, health and welfare settings.</p><p> </p><p>Since the launch of the publication, progress has been made in a number of areas including:</p><ul><li>Health Led Trials, the worlds largest trial of Individual Placement and Support, testing whether the internationally proven model to support people with severe mental health conditions to find sustained work can be as effective to those with different conditions.</li><li>More than doubled the number of Employment Advisors in IAPT services, ensuring that more people with mental health problems receive employment support to them get into or remain in work.</li><li>Undertaken a substantial package of activity within the health system itself, both to support healthcare professionals to have effective, appropriate, work conversations with their patients, and are exploring ways to reform the fit note.</li></ul>
answering member constituency North Swindon more like this
answering member printed Justin Tomlinson more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-06-18T16:10:19.66Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-18T16:10:19.66Z
answering member
4105
label Biography information for Justin Tomlinson more like this
tabling member
4131
label Biography information for Jim Shannon more like this
1123834
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2019-04-30more like thismore than 2019-04-30
answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept id 29 remove filter
answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
hansard heading Construction: Silicosis more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what information her Department holds on trends in the number of people with Silicosis in the construction industry. more like this
tabling member constituency Strangford more like this
tabling member printed
Jim Shannon remove filter
uin 249297 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-05-08more like thismore than 2019-05-08
answer text <p>Silicosis, along with coal workers pneumoconiosis and asbestosis are the most common forms of pneumoconiosis which is a prescribed disease within the Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit (IIDB) scheme. Pneumoconiosis cases not specifically identified as asbestosis or coal workers’ pneumoconiosis are mainly silicosis and the annual numbers of such cases newly assessed for IIDB over the last ten years are shown in the table below. Of these annual cases, those associated with the construction industry are also shown.</p><p> </p><p>The number of silicosis cases within the IIDB scheme is likely to be lower than the true incidence of this disease. This is because IIDB does not compensate anyone who is self-employed, and not all affected individuals apply to the scheme.</p><p> </p><p><strong>Annual new cases of pneumoconiosis not recorded as asbestosis or coal workers’ pneumoconiosis assessed for IIDB, 2008-2017</strong></p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p><strong>-</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2008</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2009</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2010</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2011</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2012</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2013</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2014</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2015</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2016</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2017</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Total</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>All cases</strong></p></td><td><p>85</p></td><td><p>80</p></td><td><p>60</p></td><td><p>50</p></td><td><p>40</p></td><td><p>45</p></td><td><p>55</p></td><td><p>25</p></td><td><p>30</p></td><td><p>30</p></td><td><p>500</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>Cases associated with construction</strong></p></td><td><p>20</p></td><td><p>20</p></td><td><p>15</p></td><td><p>10</p></td><td><p>5</p></td><td><p>10</p></td><td><p>20</p></td><td><p>10</p></td><td><p>10</p></td><td><p>10</p></td><td><p>130</p></td></tr></tbody></table><table><tbody><tr><td><p>Note: values have been rounded to the nearest 5 to meet disclosure rules.</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p> </p>
answering member constituency North Swindon more like this
answering member printed Justin Tomlinson more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-05-08T13:27:43.2Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-08T13:27:43.2Z
answering member
4105
label Biography information for Justin Tomlinson more like this
tabling member
4131
label Biography information for Jim Shannon more like this
1091204
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2019-03-19more like thismore than 2019-03-19
answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept id 29 remove filter
answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
hansard heading Universal Credit more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people have applied for universal credit; and how many of those claimants received an advance payment. more like this
tabling member constituency Strangford more like this
tabling member printed
Jim Shannon remove filter
uin 234135 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-03-25more like thismore than 2019-03-25
answer text <p>The latest available information on the number of Universal Credit claims is published and can be found at: <a href="https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/" target="_blank">https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/</a>.</p><p>Guidance on how to extract the information required can be found at: <a href="https://sw.stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/Getting-Started.html" target="_blank">https://sw.stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/Getting-Started.html</a></p><p> </p><p>Internal data shows that for February 2019, around 60% of eligible new claims to Universal Credit Full Service received an advance payment. Subject to some fluctuation, this rate of advance take-up has been broadly consistent. This shows that claimants are being made aware of advances and are using it where they need this help.</p> more like this
answering member constituency Reading West more like this
answering member printed Alok Sharma more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-03-25T14:59:48.593Zmore like thismore than 2019-03-25T14:59:48.593Z
answering member
4014
label Biography information for Alok Sharma more like this
tabling member
4131
label Biography information for Jim Shannon more like this
1050003
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2019-01-29more like thismore than 2019-01-29
answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept id 29 remove filter
answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
hansard heading Fairgrounds: Accidents more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many accidents have occurred at funfairs and amusement parks in each of the last three years. more like this
tabling member constituency Strangford more like this
tabling member printed
Jim Shannon remove filter
uin 213367 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-02-05more like thismore than 2019-02-05
answer text <p>The figures in the table below provide the number of reported injuries in Great Britain to (a) workers and (b) members of the public, notified to HSE under the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences 2013 (RIDDOR), where the industry activity recorded for the incident is ‘Activities of amusement parks and theme parks’.</p><p>The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has a dedicated National Fairground Inspection Team (NFIT) which enforces health and safety law at fairgrounds and theme parks in Great Britain. NFIT inspectors are located throughout GB and respond to accidents and incidents in their local area. They can also call on support from a range of Specialist Inspectors if necessary. The team also targets proactive inspection of fairground rides with known problems and other areas of higher risk; for the coming year’s inspection plan, 19/20, inflatable devices are identified within it as an area of work.</p><p> </p><p>Online guidance freely available from HSE website has recently been revised and the content of this made known to industry dutyholders via their trade bodies. Local Authority colleagues who also have powers to inspect such devices have been made aware of this information also.</p><p><strong> </strong></p><table><tbody><tr><td><p>Year</p></td><td><p>Members of the Public</p></td><td><p>Workers</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2015/16</p></td><td><p>446</p></td><td><p>54</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2016/17</p></td><td><p>430</p></td><td><p>56</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2017/18</p></td><td><p>369</p></td><td><p>61</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p>The following points should be noted:</p><ol><li>Statistics are identified by Standard Industrial Classification 2007 (SIC 2007) class 9321 – Activities of amusement parks and theme parks.</li><li>The term worker includes employees and self-employed persons combined.</li><li>The details provided are for injuries reported under RIDDOR – a single accident may result in more than one injury and more than one report.</li><li>RIDDOR data needs to be interpreted with care because it is known that injuries to members of the public at fairgrounds and theme parks tend to be over-reported in some parts of the industry and under-reported in others. HSE’s analysis of the data for injuries to members of the public at fairgrounds and theme parks in 2014/15 found that upwards of 75% of reported injuries did not meet the criteria for a RIDDOR reportable injury.</li></ol><p> </p>
answering member constituency Truro and Falmouth more like this
answering member printed Sarah Newton more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-02-05T17:44:31.59Zmore like thismore than 2019-02-05T17:44:31.59Z
answering member
4071
label Biography information for Sarah Newton more like this
tabling member
4131
label Biography information for Jim Shannon more like this
1027744
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2018-12-18more like thismore than 2018-12-18
answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept id 29 remove filter
answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
hansard heading Industrial Injuries more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps her Department is taking to support the reporting of workplace injuries. more like this
tabling member constituency Strangford more like this
tabling member printed
Jim Shannon remove filter
uin 203433 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-01-08more like thismore than 2019-01-08
answer text <p>The Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 2013 (RIDDOR) provides the national reporting framework necessary for the effective regulation of health and safety at work in Great Britain.</p><p> </p><p>The Regulations require employers and other people in control of work premises to report and keep records of:</p><p> </p><ul><li>work-related accidents which cause death;</li><li>work- related accidents which cause certain serious injuries (reportable injuries);</li><li>diagnosed cases of certain occupational diseases;</li><li>certain “dangerous occurrences” (incidents with the potential to cause harm).</li></ul><p> </p><p>The Regulations are made under the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 and reports are required to be made to the relevant enforcing authority.</p><p> </p><p>Earlier this year, the Regulations were subject to a post-implementation review and the report, published in October 2018, found that the Regulations remain “fit for purpose”.</p>
answering member constituency Truro and Falmouth more like this
answering member printed Sarah Newton more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-01-08T17:20:31.65Zmore like thismore than 2019-01-08T17:20:31.65Z
answering member
4071
label Biography information for Sarah Newton more like this
tabling member
4131
label Biography information for Jim Shannon more like this
1012288
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2018-11-22more like thismore than 2018-11-22
answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept id 29 remove filter
answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
hansard heading Parental Leave more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what her Department's policy is on shared parental leave. more like this
tabling member constituency Strangford more like this
tabling member printed
Jim Shannon remove filter
uin 194638 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2018-11-29more like thismore than 2018-11-29
answer text <p>The Department for Work and Pensions is committed to being a good modern employer and to offering family friendly employment policies that support business needs. This includes encouraging Shared Parental Leave by providing contractual Shared Parental Pay, which exceeds statutory arrangements and reflects best employment practice.</p><p> </p><p>Using Shared Parental Leave and Shared Parental Pay, employees who are having a baby or adopting a child may be able to share up to 50 weeks of leave and up to 37 weeks of pay, if they meet the eligibility criteria.</p><p> </p><p>For 26 of those weeks leave<strong>, </strong>if an employee meets the qualifying criteria, departmental Shared Parental Pay will be paid at full pay, less any weeks’ statutory maternity pay, maternity allowance or statutory adoption pay and leave already taken. The remaining 13 weeks will be paid at statutory rate for 13 weeks.</p><p> </p><p>Employees may be able to share the pay and leave in the first year after their child is born or placed with their family for adoption and use Shared Parental Leave to take leave in blocks separated by periods of work, or take it all in one go. Employees can also choose to be off work together or to stagger the leave and pay.</p>
answering member constituency North Swindon more like this
answering member printed Justin Tomlinson more like this
question first answered
less than 2018-11-29T11:02:34.94Zmore like thismore than 2018-11-29T11:02:34.94Z
answering member
4105
label Biography information for Justin Tomlinson more like this
tabling member
4131
label Biography information for Jim Shannon more like this
1005997
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2018-11-13more like thismore than 2018-11-13
answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept id 29 remove filter
answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
hansard heading Universal Credit more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what representations she has received about the effect on vulnerable people and those with mental health conditions of joint claims for Universal Credit which are paid to one person in the family. more like this
tabling member constituency Strangford more like this
tabling member printed
Jim Shannon remove filter
uin 190888 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2018-11-21more like thismore than 2018-11-21
answer text <p>We recognise that the move to a single monthly household payment is a significant change and therefore for a minority of claimants, alternative payment arrangements can be provided to help them manage that change. These include: managed payment of the Universal Credit housing cost to landlords; making payments more frequently than monthly (e.g. twice monthly); and splitting the payment between partners within the household.</p><p> </p><p>Splitting payments between partners is normally considered to prevent hardship to a claimant and their family, for example if the Universal Credit claimant is not managing their financial affairs and cannot or will not budget for their own or their family’s basic day to day needs.</p><p> </p><p>We take seriously the need to support vulnerable claimants. Universal Credit provides enhanced personalised support for people by simplifying the benefits system. All claimants, including vulnerable claimants and those with mental health conditions, receive continuous tailored support managed through personal work coaches, who know each person’s case.</p><p> </p><p>Additionally we can offer Personal Budgeting Support which aims to prepare claimants for the financial changes Universal Credit brings. It provides transitional support to help them manage their monthly payments and prioritise essential bills, such as rent and utilities.</p>
answering member constituency Reading West more like this
answering member printed Alok Sharma more like this
question first answered
less than 2018-11-21T16:23:24.207Zmore like thismore than 2018-11-21T16:23:24.207Z
answering member
4014
label Biography information for Alok Sharma more like this
tabling member
4131
label Biography information for Jim Shannon more like this
973262
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2018-09-13more like thismore than 2018-09-13
answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept id 29 remove filter
answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
hansard heading Maternity Leave: Universal Credit more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the effect of the roll-out of universal credit on women on maternity leave. more like this
tabling member constituency Strangford more like this
tabling member printed
Jim Shannon remove filter
uin 174726 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2018-10-15more like thismore than 2018-10-15
answer text <p>Maternity leave does not have a bearing on entitlement to UC.</p><p> </p><p>For people who are working, UC has a single taper so payments reduce at a consistent and predictable rate and they generally keep a high proportion of extra earnings.</p><p> </p><p>This applies to women on maternity leave. Some will be in receipt of UC, before, during and after their maternity leave and UC will provide a stable source of income throughout.</p><p>In addition support for child care has increased in UC from 70 per cent to 85 per cent and we will continue to pay childcare costs for an existing childcare place whilst a claimant is receiving Maternity Allowance and Statutory Maternity Pay.</p><p>No formal assessment has been made of the effect of the roll-out of Universal Credit on women on maternity leave.</p><p><strong> </strong></p> more like this
answering member constituency North Swindon more like this
answering member printed Justin Tomlinson more like this
question first answered
less than 2018-10-15T14:08:35.27Zmore like thismore than 2018-10-15T14:08:35.27Z
answering member
4105
label Biography information for Justin Tomlinson more like this
tabling member
4131
label Biography information for Jim Shannon more like this
926695
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2018-06-18more like thismore than 2018-06-18
answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept id 29 remove filter
answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
hansard heading Stress: Employment more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps his Department is taking to tackle stress in the workplace. more like this
tabling member constituency Strangford more like this
tabling member printed
Jim Shannon remove filter
uin 154714 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2018-06-26more like thismore than 2018-06-26
answer text <p>The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is responsible for work-related stress policy as the regulator for health and safety at work in Great Britain.</p><p> </p><p>Employers have a legal duty to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, the health, safety and welfare at work of all their employees. To do this, employers must assess the risks from workplace hazards, including work-related stress, and take all reasonably practicable steps to remove or reduce identified risks. HSE provides advice, guidance and tools (the HSE Stress Management Standards) that employers can use to meet these requirements for work-related stress.</p><p> </p><p>Recognising the high levels of work related stress in the public sector, HSE is currently supporting pilots in the education, prison and hospital sectors aimed at developing improved approaches to tackling this issue. These pilots form part of HSE’s engagement with employers, trades unions and the wider health and safety community, where HSE aims to work in partnership to reduce the number of new cases of ill health caused by work-related stress and to integrate their work into the Government’s wider agenda on supporting the mental wellbeing of the working population.</p><p> </p><p>Further details of HSE’s activity can be found at: <a href="http://www.hse.gov.uk/aboutus/strategiesandplans/sector-health-plans.htm" target="_blank">http://www.hse.gov.uk/aboutus/strategiesandplans/sector-health-plans.htm</a>.</p><p> </p>
answering member constituency Truro and Falmouth more like this
answering member printed Sarah Newton more like this
question first answered
less than 2018-06-26T17:00:24.32Zmore like thismore than 2018-06-26T17:00:24.32Z
answering member
4071
label Biography information for Sarah Newton more like this
tabling member
4131
label Biography information for Jim Shannon more like this