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1135182
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-27more like thismore than 2019-06-27
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Genetics: Screening more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, which diagnostic tests will whole genome sequencing replace, particularly for blood cancers. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Sheffield South East remove filter
star this property tabling member printed
Mr Clive Betts more like this
star this property uin 270281 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false remove filter
star this property date of answer less than 2019-07-05more like thismore than 2019-07-05
star this property answer text <p>During 2019, the National Health Service will begin to offer whole genome sequencing (WGS) as part of clinical care for:</p><p>- Seriously ill children likely to have a rare genetic disorder;</p><p>- People with one of 21 rare conditions where current evidence supports early adoption of WGS as a diagnostic test; and</p><p>- People with specific types of cancer for which there is likely to be the greatest patient benefit from using WGS – children with cancer, sarcoma and acute myeloid leukaemia.</p><p> </p><p>WGS will only replace existing diagnostic tests once the testing is demonstrated to be clinically safe to replace existing diagnostic testing. Initially, existing diagnostic testing will continue to be performed alongside WGS testing where clinically appropriate. This will continue until WGS is able to fully support clinical decision making within clinically appropriate timescales.</p><p>Current testing for blood cancers includes a number of diagnostic tests, the current expectation is that WGS will not be used to replace tests that require very fast turnaround times (under 24 hours) or high sensitivity.</p><p>WGS and non-WGS testing that will be available as part of clinical care is outlined in the National Genomic Test Directory at the following link:</p><p> </p><p><a href="https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/national-genomic-test-directories/" target="_blank">https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/national-genomic-test-directories/</a></p><p> </p><p>The UK Genetic Testing Network (UKGTN) published the NHS Directory of Genetic Disorders/Genes for Diagnostic Testing, which evaluated and recommended genetic tests for rare and inherited disorders for the National Health Service across the UK. However, there was not an equivalent for cancer genomic testing. The National Genomic Test Directory specifies which genomic tests are commissioned by the NHS in England, the technology by which they are available, and the patients who will be eligible to access to a test.</p><p>The National Genomic Test Directory will be updated on an annual basis and NHS England will implement a clear and transparent process, supported by a Clinical and Scientific Expert Panel, to determine which tests are available within the NHS. This will include reviewing any tests that may be retired or replaced by more modern technology, such as WGS. As the price of WGS falls and the clinical evidence improves, we envisage that it will be extended to more conditions and therefore more patients.</p><p> </p><p><strong> </strong></p><p><strong> </strong></p>
unstar this property answering member constituency Gosport more like this
star this property answering member printed Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
270282 more like this
270283 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-07-05T09:24:02.73Zmore like thismore than 2019-07-05T09:24:02.73Z
star this property answering member
4008
star this property label Biography information for Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property tabling member
394
star this property label Biography information for Mr Clive Betts more like this
1135183
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-27more like thismore than 2019-06-27
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Genetics: Screening more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the National Genomic Test Directory directly replaces the NHS Directory of Genetic Disorders/Genes for Diagnostic Testing. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Sheffield South East remove filter
star this property tabling member printed
Mr Clive Betts more like this
star this property uin 270282 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false remove filter
star this property date of answer less than 2019-07-05more like thismore than 2019-07-05
star this property answer text <p>During 2019, the National Health Service will begin to offer whole genome sequencing (WGS) as part of clinical care for:</p><p>- Seriously ill children likely to have a rare genetic disorder;</p><p>- People with one of 21 rare conditions where current evidence supports early adoption of WGS as a diagnostic test; and</p><p>- People with specific types of cancer for which there is likely to be the greatest patient benefit from using WGS – children with cancer, sarcoma and acute myeloid leukaemia.</p><p> </p><p>WGS will only replace existing diagnostic tests once the testing is demonstrated to be clinically safe to replace existing diagnostic testing. Initially, existing diagnostic testing will continue to be performed alongside WGS testing where clinically appropriate. This will continue until WGS is able to fully support clinical decision making within clinically appropriate timescales.</p><p>Current testing for blood cancers includes a number of diagnostic tests, the current expectation is that WGS will not be used to replace tests that require very fast turnaround times (under 24 hours) or high sensitivity.</p><p>WGS and non-WGS testing that will be available as part of clinical care is outlined in the National Genomic Test Directory at the following link:</p><p> </p><p><a href="https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/national-genomic-test-directories/" target="_blank">https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/national-genomic-test-directories/</a></p><p> </p><p>The UK Genetic Testing Network (UKGTN) published the NHS Directory of Genetic Disorders/Genes for Diagnostic Testing, which evaluated and recommended genetic tests for rare and inherited disorders for the National Health Service across the UK. However, there was not an equivalent for cancer genomic testing. The National Genomic Test Directory specifies which genomic tests are commissioned by the NHS in England, the technology by which they are available, and the patients who will be eligible to access to a test.</p><p>The National Genomic Test Directory will be updated on an annual basis and NHS England will implement a clear and transparent process, supported by a Clinical and Scientific Expert Panel, to determine which tests are available within the NHS. This will include reviewing any tests that may be retired or replaced by more modern technology, such as WGS. As the price of WGS falls and the clinical evidence improves, we envisage that it will be extended to more conditions and therefore more patients.</p><p> </p><p><strong> </strong></p><p><strong> </strong></p>
unstar this property answering member constituency Gosport more like this
star this property answering member printed Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
270281 more like this
270283 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-07-05T09:24:02.807Zmore like thismore than 2019-07-05T09:24:02.807Z
star this property answering member
4008
star this property label Biography information for Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property tabling member
394
star this property label Biography information for Mr Clive Betts more like this
1135184
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-27more like thismore than 2019-06-27
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Genetics: Screening more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how will new tests be added to the National Genomic Test Directory. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Sheffield South East remove filter
star this property tabling member printed
Mr Clive Betts more like this
star this property uin 270283 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false remove filter
star this property date of answer less than 2019-07-05more like thismore than 2019-07-05
star this property answer text <p>During 2019, the National Health Service will begin to offer whole genome sequencing (WGS) as part of clinical care for:</p><p>- Seriously ill children likely to have a rare genetic disorder;</p><p>- People with one of 21 rare conditions where current evidence supports early adoption of WGS as a diagnostic test; and</p><p>- People with specific types of cancer for which there is likely to be the greatest patient benefit from using WGS – children with cancer, sarcoma and acute myeloid leukaemia.</p><p> </p><p>WGS will only replace existing diagnostic tests once the testing is demonstrated to be clinically safe to replace existing diagnostic testing. Initially, existing diagnostic testing will continue to be performed alongside WGS testing where clinically appropriate. This will continue until WGS is able to fully support clinical decision making within clinically appropriate timescales.</p><p>Current testing for blood cancers includes a number of diagnostic tests, the current expectation is that WGS will not be used to replace tests that require very fast turnaround times (under 24 hours) or high sensitivity.</p><p>WGS and non-WGS testing that will be available as part of clinical care is outlined in the National Genomic Test Directory at the following link:</p><p> </p><p><a href="https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/national-genomic-test-directories/" target="_blank">https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/national-genomic-test-directories/</a></p><p> </p><p>The UK Genetic Testing Network (UKGTN) published the NHS Directory of Genetic Disorders/Genes for Diagnostic Testing, which evaluated and recommended genetic tests for rare and inherited disorders for the National Health Service across the UK. However, there was not an equivalent for cancer genomic testing. The National Genomic Test Directory specifies which genomic tests are commissioned by the NHS in England, the technology by which they are available, and the patients who will be eligible to access to a test.</p><p>The National Genomic Test Directory will be updated on an annual basis and NHS England will implement a clear and transparent process, supported by a Clinical and Scientific Expert Panel, to determine which tests are available within the NHS. This will include reviewing any tests that may be retired or replaced by more modern technology, such as WGS. As the price of WGS falls and the clinical evidence improves, we envisage that it will be extended to more conditions and therefore more patients.</p><p> </p><p><strong> </strong></p><p><strong> </strong></p>
unstar this property answering member constituency Gosport more like this
star this property answering member printed Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
270281 more like this
270282 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-07-05T09:24:02.857Zmore like thismore than 2019-07-05T09:24:02.857Z
star this property answering member
4008
star this property label Biography information for Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property tabling member
394
star this property label Biography information for Mr Clive Betts more like this
1132282
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-14more like thismore than 2019-06-14
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Genetics: Screening more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of patients that will benefit from whole genome sequencing in the first year of its introduction; and what steps is he taking to ensure the adequacy of trained professionals to provide that service. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Sheffield South East remove filter
star this property tabling member printed
Mr Clive Betts more like this
star this property uin 264725 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false remove filter
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-19more like thismore than 2019-06-19
star this property answer text <p>As part of the NHS Long Term Plan, the National Health Service has committed to sequencing 500,000 whole genomes by 2023/24.</p><p>During 2019, the NHS will begin to offer whole genome sequencing (WGS) as part of clinical care for:</p><p>- Seriously ill children likely to have a rare genetic disorder;</p><p>- People with one of 21 rare conditions where current evidence supports early adoption of WGS as a diagnostic test;</p><p>- People with specific types of cancer for which there is likely to be the greatest patient benefit from using WGS – children with cancer, sarcoma and Acute Myeloid Leukaemia.</p><p> </p><p>As the price of whole genome sequencing falls and the evidence improves, we envisage that it will be extended to more conditions and therefore more patients.</p> more like this
unstar this property answering member constituency Gosport more like this
star this property answering member printed Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-19T16:17:13.117Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-19T16:17:13.117Z
star this property answering member
4008
star this property label Biography information for Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property tabling member
394
star this property label Biography information for Mr Clive Betts more like this
1124146
star this property registered interest true more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-01more like thismore than 2019-05-01
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Cancer: Drugs more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 25 April 2019 to Question 245610, how many forms of cancer have no maintenance drug available at any stage in the treatment plan. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Sheffield South East remove filter
star this property tabling member printed
Mr Clive Betts more like this
star this property uin 249828 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false remove filter
star this property date of answer less than 2019-05-08more like thismore than 2019-05-08
star this property answer text <p>The information requested is not available.</p> more like this
unstar this property answering member constituency South Ribble more like this
star this property answering member printed Seema Kennedy more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-08T13:54:02.043Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-08T13:54:02.043Z
star this property answering member
4455
star this property label Biography information for Seema Kennedy more like this
star this property tabling member
394
star this property label Biography information for Mr Clive Betts more like this
1121970
star this property registered interest true more like this
star this property date less than 2019-04-18more like thismore than 2019-04-18
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Cancer: Drugs more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 15 April 2019 to Question 242692 on Cancer: Drugs, what steps the Government is taking to give timely NICE and NHS approval to enable access to maintenance medication for people with cancer. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Sheffield South East remove filter
star this property tabling member printed
Mr Clive Betts more like this
star this property uin 245610 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false remove filter
star this property date of answer less than 2019-04-25more like thismore than 2019-04-25
star this property answer text <p>Through its technology appraisal programme, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) makes recommendations for the National Health Service on whether drugs and other treatments represent an effective use of NHS resources. NHS England is legally required to fund cancer drugs recommended in NICE technology appraisal guidance.</p><p>The Government wants patients with cancer to be able to benefit from rapid access to effective new drugs, including for maintenance treatment. Under arrangements introduced in 2016, NICE now develops technology appraisal guidance for the NHS on all new cancer drugs. Wherever possible, NICE aims to issue draft guidance on new cancer drugs before licensing and to publish final guidance within 90 days of licensing.</p><p>Funding is available through the Cancer Drugs Fund from the point at which NICE draft recommendations are published, or if the drug is not currently licensed, from the point of licensing. This ensures patients are able to benefit from effective new cancer drugs as quickly as possible.</p>
unstar this property answering member constituency South Ribble more like this
star this property answering member printed Seema Kennedy more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-04-25T14:05:35.397Zmore like thismore than 2019-04-25T14:05:35.397Z
star this property answering member
4455
star this property label Biography information for Seema Kennedy more like this
star this property tabling member
394
star this property label Biography information for Mr Clive Betts more like this
1110551
star this property registered interest true more like this
star this property date less than 2019-04-09more like thismore than 2019-04-09
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Cancer: Drugs more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps is the Government taking to ensure timely access to maintenance medication for people with cancer. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Sheffield South East remove filter
star this property tabling member printed
Mr Clive Betts more like this
star this property uin 242692 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false remove filter
star this property date of answer less than 2019-04-15more like thismore than 2019-04-15
star this property answer text <p>The Department fully understands that maintaining access to cancer medication is vitally important to many people in this country.</p><p> </p><p>There is already a team within the Department that deals with medicine supply issues arising both in the community and hospitals. We have well established procedures to deal with medicine shortages, from whatever cause, and work closely with the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency, the pharmaceutical industry, NHS England and others operating in the supply chain to help prevent shortages and to ensure that the risks to patients are minimised when they do arise.</p><p> </p><p>If we are aware of issues with cancer medications we work with national clinical experts to advise on management plans and ensure that appropriate information is provided to the National Health Service and specialist patient groups.</p> more like this
unstar this property answering member constituency South Ribble more like this
star this property answering member printed Seema Kennedy more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-04-15T12:58:08.703Zmore like thismore than 2019-04-15T12:58:08.703Z
star this property answering member
4455
star this property label Biography information for Seema Kennedy more like this
star this property tabling member
394
star this property label Biography information for Mr Clive Betts more like this
1110552
star this property registered interest true more like this
star this property date less than 2019-04-09more like thismore than 2019-04-09
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Medical Treatments more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the appraisal process for personalised treatments for small patient groups. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Sheffield South East remove filter
star this property tabling member printed
Mr Clive Betts more like this
star this property uin 242693 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false remove filter
star this property date of answer less than 2019-04-15more like thismore than 2019-04-15
star this property answer text <p>The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is the independent body that provides guidance on the prevention and treatment of ill health and the promotion of good health and social care. Through its technology appraisal and highly specialised technologies programmes, NICE plays an important role in ensuring that patients are able to benefit from effective new treatments, including treatments for small numbers of patients. NICE has recommended a number of drugs for small patient populations through these programmes that are now routinely funded by the National Health Service for eligible patients.</p><p> </p><p>NICE periodically reviews its methods and processes to ensure that they keep pace with developments in science and healthcare. NICE will be carrying out a review of its technology appraisal and highly specialised technologies methods in 2019/20.</p> more like this
unstar this property answering member constituency South Ribble more like this
star this property answering member printed Seema Kennedy more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-04-15T12:55:57.447Zmore like thismore than 2019-04-15T12:55:57.447Z
star this property answering member
4455
star this property label Biography information for Seema Kennedy more like this
star this property tabling member
394
star this property label Biography information for Mr Clive Betts more like this
1082575
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-03-06more like thismore than 2019-03-06
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Respite Care more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much funding allocated to councils for respite care has been accessed to date; and what steps his Department is taking to encourage carers to make use of that support. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Sheffield South East remove filter
star this property tabling member printed
Mr Clive Betts more like this
star this property uin 229090 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false remove filter
star this property date of answer less than 2019-03-11more like thismore than 2019-03-11
star this property answer text <p>Since 2015, the National Health Service contribution to the Better Care Fund (BCF) has included funding to support the implementation of the Care Act 2014, including £130 million which has been made available each year for Carers’ Breaks via the NHS clinical commissioning groups (CCG) minimum contribution to the BCF.</p><p>Locally agreed between local authorities (LAs) and CCGs, joint BCF plans set out the level of resource that will be dedicated to carer-specific support, including carers’ breaks, and identify how the chosen methods for supporting carers will help to meet key outcomes. These BCF plans are agreed locally at Health and Wellbeing Board level as part of the BCF Assurance process, and funding is released under the premise that the requirements and conditions of the Fund are met. The local level allocation data is not readily available at a national level.</p><p>We recognise the importance of carers being able to take a break from their caring role. Through the Carers Action Plan, we have committed to promoting best practice for LAs, service providers and commissioners on carer breaks and respite care. In doing so this will support them to help carers to take a break by highlighting best practice and provide advice and information for carers seeking respite breaks.</p>
unstar this property answering member constituency Gosport more like this
star this property answering member printed Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-03-11T17:10:29.497Zmore like thismore than 2019-03-11T17:10:29.497Z
star this property answering member
4008
star this property label Biography information for Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property tabling member
394
star this property label Biography information for Mr Clive Betts more like this
1082576
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-03-06more like thismore than 2019-03-06
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Social Services: Staff more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the Government plans to introduce a requirement for social care workers in England to be registered. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Sheffield South East remove filter
star this property tabling member printed
Mr Clive Betts more like this
star this property uin 229091 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false remove filter
star this property date of answer less than 2019-03-11more like thismore than 2019-03-11
star this property answer text <p>Care workers in England are subject to employer checks and controls including a Disclosure and Barring Service check. Since 2015, healthcare assistants and care support workers have been expected to achieve the care certificate before working unsupervised. This contains 15 standards setting out a common set of skills, knowledge and behaviours that are needed in order to provide safe, high quality and compassionate care.</p><p> </p><p>The Government is committed to a proportionate system of safeguards for the professionals who work in the health and care system. Statutory professional regulation should only be used in cases where the risks to the public cannot be mitigated in other ways. We have no plans to introduce a requirement for social care workers in England to be registered in England at this time.</p> more like this
unstar this property answering member constituency Gosport more like this
star this property answering member printed Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-03-11T17:07:02.307Zmore like thismore than 2019-03-11T17:07:02.307Z
star this property answering member
4008
star this property label Biography information for Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property tabling member
394
star this property label Biography information for Mr Clive Betts more like this