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164499
unstar this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-11-24more like thismore than 2014-11-24
star this property answering body
Department of Health more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Health more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health more like this
star this property hansard heading NHS: Negligence more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government by how much the provision for clinical negligence claims against the National Health Service has grown in the last year; why it has grown; and what strategy is in place for reducing that amount. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Sharkey more like this
star this property uin HL3092 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction true more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2014-12-04more like thismore than 2014-12-04
unstar this property answer text <p>As at 31 March 2014, the National Health Service Litigation Authority (NHS LA) estimates that it has potential liabilities of £26.1 billion, of which £25.7 billion relates to clinical negligence. This is an increase of £3.1 billion from 31 March 201<del class="ministerial">4<ins class="ministerial">3</ins></del>, which can mainly be attributed to a continual rise in clinical negligence claims over recent years. There are a number of factors driving this increase, including the rise in the number of patients cared for and in the complexity of their care; and the general rise in litigation across a number of sectors including the NHS, driven in part by ‘no win, no fee’ agreements. It is anticipated that the effect of the latter is likely to diminish as a result of the Government’s Legal Aid Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act of 2012.</p><p> </p><p>The Department believes the best way to reduce negligence claims is to improve patient care and safety. In March 2014, the Secretary of State for Health issued a call to action to make the NHS the safest healthcare system in the world and achieve a three-year goal to halve avoidable harm and save 6,000 lives. The Sign up to Safety campaign embodies the ambition of the NHS to build a culture of safety, bringing together individuals and organisations with a contribution to make towards the patient safety goal. Elements of this campaign will focus on a reduction in avoidable harm that can lead to compensation claims. Organisations that sign up are setting out what they will do to strengthen patient safety, including a safety improvement plan which shows how their organisation intends to save lives and reduce harm for patients over the next three years. The NHS Litigation Authority, which already provides a “safety and learning service” to trusts<strong>,</strong> will support those organisations which have patient safety improvement plans that show a likely reduction in their higher volume, higher value claims.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Earl Howe more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-12-04T16:04:05.87Zmore like thismore than 2014-12-04T16:04:05.87Z
star this property question first ministerially corrected
less than 2015-01-13T14:37:59.487Zmore like thismore than 2015-01-13T14:37:59.487Z
star this property answering member
2000
unstar this property label Biography information for Earl Howe more like this
star this property previous answer version
31769
star this property answering member printed Earl Howe more like this
star this property answering member
2000
star this property label Biography information for Earl Howe remove filter
star this property tabling member
4196
star this property label Biography information for Lord Sharkey more like this
177981
unstar this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-02-04more like thismore than 2015-02-04
star this property answering body
Department of Health more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Health more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health more like this
star this property hansard heading Passive Smoking more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is their estimate of the number of people who died as a result of passive smoking in each of the last five years. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Laird more like this
star this property uin HL4692 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction true more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-02-17more like thismore than 2015-02-17
unstar this property answer text <p>Exposure to secondhand smoke is a serious health hazard. More than 50 carcinogens have been identified in secondhand smoke.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The report of the United States Surgeon General titled “<em>The health consequences of involuntary exposure to tobacco smoke”</em> concluded that secondhand smoke causes premature death and disease in children and adults who do not smoke. The scientific evidence indicates that there is no risk-free level of exposure to secondhand smoke. Children exposed to secondhand smoke are at an increased risk for sudden infant death syndrome, acute respiratory infections, ear problems and more severe asthma. Smoking by parents causes respiratory symptoms and slows lung growth in children. Exposure of adults to secondhand smoke has immediate adverse effects on the cardiovascular system and causes coronary heart disease and lung cancer. Legislation to stop smoking in vehicles carrying children will come into force in England on 1 October 2015.</p><p> </p><p><br /> The report of the Royal College of <ins class="ministerial">Physicians </ins><del class="ministerial">Surgeons</del> titled “<em>Going smoke-free: The medical case for clean air in the home, at work and in public places”</em> included estimates that secondhand smoke exposure caused approximately 12<del class="ministerial">2</del>,200 deaths in the United Kingdom in 2003, and that the majority of these deaths occurred as a result of exposure to secondhand smoke in the home. These estimates were made prior to the introduction of smokefree legislation in England in 2007. Over the past decade, the proportion of smokers who say that they do not smoke in the home has increased.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The evidence is clear that smokefree legislation in England has had beneficial effects on health, as set out in the report “<em>The Impact of smokefree legislation in England: evidence review”</em> which was published alongside the Government’s <em>“Tobacco Control Plan for England”</em> in March 2011.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The reports referred to have been placed in the Library.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Earl Howe more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-02-17T16:08:25.233Zmore like thismore than 2015-02-17T16:08:25.233Z
star this property question first ministerially corrected
less than 2015-03-12T12:34:25.527Zmore like thismore than 2015-03-12T12:34:25.527Z
star this property answering member
2000
unstar this property label Biography information for Earl Howe more like this
star this property previous answer version
45462
star this property answering member printed Earl Howe more like this
star this property answering member
2000
star this property label Biography information for Earl Howe remove filter
star this property tabling member
2479
star this property label Biography information for Lord Laird more like this