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1002202
unstar this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2018-11-05more like thismore than 2018-11-05
star this property answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept id 13 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property hansard heading Biodiversity more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the findings in the Living Planet Report 2018, published by the World Wildlife Fund and Zoological Society of London, that (1) there has been a decline of 60 per cent in species population sizes between 1970 and 2014, and (2) species population declines are especially pronounced in the tropics; and what strategy, if any, they have to address these findings. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Alton of Liverpool more like this
star this property uin HL11223 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2018-11-13more like thismore than 2018-11-13
star this property answer text <p>The Government recognises that there have been declines in species populations across the world since 1970 and that declines have been pronounced in many tropical ecosystems. This downward trend and the impact it has on peoples’ economic and social wellbeing highlights the need to strengthen international efforts to tackle biodiversity loss.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The Government is committed to being the first generation to leave our environment in a better state than we found it. We are already working worldwide, including in the tropics, to tackle biodiversity loss, by:</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><ul><li><p>Investing more than £36 million between 2014 and 2021 to tackle the illegal wildlife trade, and hosting the fourth international Illegal Wildlife Trade conference last month in London. The conference represented a significant step forward in the global fight to eliminate this trade;</p></li><li><p>Committing £210 million of Defra’s International Climate Finance to support projects that aim to protect and restore more than 500,000 hectares of the world’s most biodiverse forests. For example, we are supporting communities in Madagascar to protect mangrove forests, which are important habitats for the protection of many species, some of which are found nowhere else on earth;</p></li><li><p>Ambitious plans under the Government’s 25 Year Environment Plan to reverse the decline of many species and help wildlife survive and thrive. We are committed to protecting the oceans, and have called for at least 30 per cent of the oceans to be in Marine Protected Areas by 2030. The UK is also leading the fight against plastic pollution; and</p></li><li><p>Introducing one of the world’s toughest bans on ivory sales to protect the elephant.</p></li></ul><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>We are also committed to developing an ambitious post-2020 strategic framework for biodiversity and are working with countries around the world to achieve this under the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity.</p><p> </p>
unstar this property answering member printed Lord Gardiner of Kimble more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2018-11-13T14:56:26.827Zmore like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering member
4161
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Gardiner of Kimble more like this
star this property tabling member
738
star this property label Biography information for Lord Alton of Liverpool remove filter
1024219
unstar this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2018-12-12more like thismore than 2018-12-12
star this property answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept id 13 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property hansard heading Plastics: Bottles more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government how many plastic bottles they estimate are used in the UK each year; what proportion of these plastic bottles is recyclable; and whether cans and glass bottles do more harm to the environment than plastic bottles. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Alton of Liverpool more like this
star this property uin HL12219 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2018-12-28more like thismore than 2018-12-28
star this property answer text <p>Evidence received as part of a Government Call for Evidence suggests that UK consumers go through an estimated 14 billion plastic drinks bottles a year, all of which are recyclable. Whether they are actually recycled depends on the local collection service and demand in end markets.</p><p> </p><p>The aim of good waste management is to maximise recovery of useful materials and minimise impacts on the environment. There is evidence of the gradation of harm to the environment from the presence of different materials, however the Government has not carried out any assessment of the relative impacts of different types of litter on the environment.</p><p> </p><p>WRAP’s (Waste and Resources Action Programme) carbon ready reckoner assesses the carbon impacts of different types of packaging. WRAP analysis suggests that it is not the material that is the determining factor of its carbon footprint, but rather other considerations such as packaging weight, recycled content, performance, and management of the packaging at end of life. The carbon footprint of all packaging materials can be reduced through optimising recycled content and weight.</p><p> </p><p>Different materials have different environmental costs and benefits and, as set out in the Resources and Waste Strategy, our goal is to maximise the value of the resources we use whilst minimising waste and its impact on the environment.</p><p> </p><p> </p>
unstar this property answering member printed Lord Gardiner of Kimble more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2018-12-28T13:10:29.887Zmore like thismore than 2018-12-28T13:10:29.887Z
star this property answering member
4161
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Gardiner of Kimble more like this
star this property tabling member
738
star this property label Biography information for Lord Alton of Liverpool remove filter
1024220
unstar this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2018-12-12more like thismore than 2018-12-12
star this property answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept id 13 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property hansard heading Plastics: Packaging more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of whether polyethylene terephthalate (PET) has a lower carbon footprint than other forms of alternative packaging; why there is only one site in the UK able to recycle PET for use in food grade products; and what assessment they have made of the absence of such facilities on the amount of waste exported for recycling. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Alton of Liverpool more like this
star this property uin HL12220 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2018-12-28more like thismore than 2018-12-28
star this property answer text <p>The Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP) has assessed the carbon footprint of different types of packaging as part of its carbon ready reckoner, which assesses the carbon impacts of design changes to a packaged product. WRAP analysis suggests that in assessing polyethylene terephthalate (PET), compared with other forms of packaging, it is not the material that is the determining factor of its carbon footprint, but rather other considerations such as packaging weight, recycled content, performance, and management of the packaging at end of life. The carbon footprint of all packaging materials can be reduced through optimising recycled content and weight.</p><p> </p><p>The number of recycling facilities in the UK is driven by demand from industry in meeting their packaging recycling and recovery obligations, as part of a market-based form of producer responsibility. The decision by manufacturers whether to use recycled content in their products is a complex one. New Government policies, that will shortly be consulted on, such as reform of the packaging waste producer responsibility system and introducing a deposit return scheme for single-use drinks containers, will help to increase the quality and quantity of materials available to recyclers and stimulate demand for secondary materials. The Government has also announced the introduction of a new tax from April 2022 on any produced or imported plastic packaging that does not include at least 30% recycled content, which will further drive up demand.</p>
unstar this property answering member printed Lord Gardiner of Kimble more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2018-12-28T13:16:30.75Zmore like thismore than 2018-12-28T13:16:30.75Z
star this property answering member
4161
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Gardiner of Kimble more like this
star this property tabling member
738
star this property label Biography information for Lord Alton of Liverpool remove filter