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1126460
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept id 13 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs remove filter
unstar this property hansard heading Plastics: Waste more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate he has made of the amount of plastic waste which will be produced per annum in the event that avoidable plastic waste is reduced to zero by 2050 in accordance with the Government's strategic ambition. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Cardiff Central more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Jo Stevens more like this
star this property uin 254215 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2019-05-20more like thismore than 2019-05-20
star this property answer text <p>This is a devolved matter and the information provided therefore relates to England only.</p><p> </p><p>The Government has committed to eliminating all avoidable plastic waste throughout the lifetime of the 25 Year Environment Plan. Our working definition of ‘avoidable plastic waste’ is plastic waste that is technically, economically, and environmentally feasible to reuse or recycle, or, where this does not apply, it is (technically, economically, and environmentally) feasible to replace with alternatives that are reusable or recyclable. It is our intention that there will not be any avoidable plastic waste by 2050.</p><p> </p><p>We will be publishing an evaluation plan and indicator framework for the Resources and Waste Strategy later this year. This will set out further details on how we intend to monitor progress to reduce avoidable waste. This will be a living document where we will publish updates as we develop our methodologies to better capture the data and as new evidence comes to light, particularly with the indicator framework. We are confident that we have set out an ambitious programme of reform which will ensure that we meet our strategic goals.</p><p> </p><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency Suffolk Coastal more like this
star this property answering member printed Dr Thérèse Coffey more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-20T10:40:54.023Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-20T10:40:54.023Z
star this property answering member
4098
star this property label Biography information for Dr Thérèse Coffey more like this
unstar this property tabling member
4425
unstar this property label Biography information for Jo Stevens more like this
1126696
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept id 13 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs remove filter
unstar this property hansard heading Nappies more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of (1) reusable, and (2) disposable, nappies on the (a) environment, and (b) collection and disposal of refuse; and what incentives they are encouraging for the use of reusable nappies. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Greaves more like this
star this property uin HL15713 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2019-05-20more like thismore than 2019-05-20
star this property answer text <p>The Government recognises the need to address the issues associated with the environmental impact of nappies. In line with the Resources and Waste Strategy published in December last year, we are considering the best approach for a range of products.</p><p> </p><p>There are a number of policy measures available to us, including standards and consumer information, and we believe the right approach for each product requires careful consideration taking account of various factors, for example, waste benefits versus energy usage. We are therefore carrying out some new research into the impacts of reusable and disposable nappies. This will help us decide on the best course of action for the future and in terms of Government support.</p><p> </p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Gardiner of Kimble more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-20T16:26:12.017Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-20T16:26:12.017Z
star this property answering member
4161
star this property label Biography information for Lord Gardiner of Kimble more like this
unstar this property tabling member
2569
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Greaves more like this
1126716
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept id 13 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs remove filter
unstar this property hansard heading Electric Vehicles: Batteries more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the number of electric vehicle batteries in the UK that will need to be recycled in (1) 2020, (2) 2030, (3) 2040, and (4) 2050; and what assessment they have made of the UK's capacity to meet this demand for battery recycling given that there are no lithium-ion recycling facilities in the UK. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Mendelsohn more like this
star this property uin HL15733 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2019-05-20more like thismore than 2019-05-20
star this property answer text <p>The Government has not made an estimate of the number of electric vehicle batteries in the UK that will need to be recycled in the future. However, the Government’s Road to Zero Strategy, published last year, set out the ambition that by 2030 50%-70% of new cars sold and up to 40% of new vans sold are ultra low emission and that by 2040 those percentages rise to 100%. Presently, cars and vans have an average lifespan of around 14 years before they become end-of-life vehicles, and figures published by the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders show that in 2018 there were new car registrations of 2,367,147 units and for light commercial vehicles 357,325 units. Of these, 141,234 units were for plug-in and hybrid vehicles.</p><p> </p><p>Second life applications are being explored for batteries which are no longer able to perform as required in electric vehicles. An example is in energy storage solutions, which will delay the point at which the battery has to be recycled.</p><p> </p><p>Electric car batteries are classified as industrial batteries and covered under the Waste Batteries and Accumulators Regulations 2009. This bans the disposal to landfill of such batteries and their incineration. It also establishes take-back and recycling obligations for industrial battery producers.</p><p> </p><p>The UK’s £246 million Faraday Battery Challenge is playing a leading role in promoting the reuse and recycling of battery components. One of the eight technical challenges set is to be able to recycle 95% of an electric vehicle battery pack by 2035.</p><p> </p><p>A number of live projects are exploring this area including a £10 million Faraday Institution research project. This is developing the technological, economic and policy framework that would allow high percentages of the materials in lithium-ion batteries at the end of their first life to be reused or recycled. In addition, several collaborative research and development projects are looking at reusing, remanufacturing or recycling end-of-life, automotive lithium-ion batteries.</p><p> </p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Gardiner of Kimble more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-20T16:45:56.537Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-20T16:45:56.537Z
star this property answering member
4161
star this property label Biography information for Lord Gardiner of Kimble more like this
unstar this property tabling member
4286
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Mendelsohn more like this