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100054
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-10-21more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering body
Home Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 1 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Home Office more like this
unstar this property answering dept sort name Home Office more like this
star this property hansard heading European Arrest Warrants more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government, in the event of the United Kingdom not opting back into the provisions of the European Arrest Warrant, which member states still have on their statute books the legislation necessary to revert to the Council of Europe Convention on Extradition 1957. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Inglewood more like this
star this property uin HL2260 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2014-11-17more like thismore than 2014-11-17
star this property answer text <p>All EU member states have ratified the 1957 Council of Europe Convention on Extradition (ECE). Consequently, they will all have legislation that allows them to operate the ECE with other ECE signatories who do not use the Arrest Warrant. However, a number of EU member states have subsequently passed specific legislation to implement the Arrest Warrant and would need to pass new domestic legislation in order to allow them to operate the ECE with the UK. In some cases, this could be a lengthy process. For example, we believe that it would take the Netherlands at least a year to pass the necessary legislation and during this time they would not be able to issue extradition requests to the UK, or respond to UK extradition requests. Effectively, this would make both countries a safe haven for each others’ criminals.<br><br>Under the 1957 European Convention on Extradition, 22 Member States may also refuse to extradite its own nationals which means that some people may never face justice. In non-European Arrest Warrant cases, the following EU Member States have an absolute bar on extraditing their own nationals to the UK:<br><br>Austria<br>Belgium<br>Czech Republic<br>Finland <br>France<br>Germany<br>Greece<br>Latvia<br>Luxembourg<br>Slovakia<br>Slovenia<br>Spain<br>Sweden<br><br>A further nine have made declarations to the 1957 European Convention on Extradition to the effect that they will not extradite their own nationals:<br><br>Bulgaria<br>Croatia<br>Cyprus<br>Estonia<br>Hungary<br>Lithuania<br>Poland<br>Portugal<br>Romania</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Bates more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-11-17T12:19:37.777Zmore like thismore than 2014-11-17T12:19:37.777Z
star this property answering member
1091
star this property label Biography information for Lord Bates more like this
star this property tabling member
1980
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Inglewood more like this
100071
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-10-21more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering body
Home Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 1 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Home Office more like this
unstar this property answering dept sort name Home Office more like this
star this property hansard heading Asylum: Finance more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they have assessed the effectiveness of the combination of the Azure payment card and support under section 4 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999 in enabling refused asylum seekers to meet their basic needs. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Roberts of Llandudno more like this
star this property uin HL2277 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2014-10-28more like thismore than 2014-10-28
star this property answer text <p>The Azure card is issued to destitute failed asylum seekers accommodated under section 4 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999 because they are temporarily unable to leave the United Kingdom. The card can be used at most of the main supermarket chains to purchase food and other essential items. The performance of the card is kept under regular review but the Government is satisfied that it is an effective way of ensuring that recipients are able to meet their essential living needs and are not left destitute.</p><p> </p><p>The Government therefore has no plans to abolish the card or change legislation to allow people supported under section 4 to receive cash instead.</p><p> </p><p>The total administrative costs of the card scheme since it was introduced in 2009 are approximately £1,515,000. Estimated administrative costs for the current financial year are £200,000.</p><p> </p><p>The Government published its response to the House of Commons Home Affairs Committee report about asylum procedures in December 2013 (cm 8769). A response to the Committee’s views on section 4 support was set out on page 18-19.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Bates more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
HL2278 more like this
HL2279 more like this
HL2280 more like this
HL2281 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-10-28T15:17:54.1853177Zmore like thismore than 2014-10-28T15:17:54.1853177Z
star this property answering member
1091
star this property label Biography information for Lord Bates more like this
star this property tabling member
3691
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Roberts of Llandudno more like this
100072
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-10-21more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering body
Home Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 1 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Home Office more like this
unstar this property answering dept sort name Home Office more like this
star this property hansard heading Asylum: Finance more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government what plans they have to abolish the Azure payment card and amend legislation to enable the provision of cash support for all refused asylum seekers until they are either given status in the United Kingdom or return to their country of origin. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Roberts of Llandudno more like this
star this property uin HL2278 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2014-10-28more like thismore than 2014-10-28
star this property answer text <p>The Azure card is issued to destitute failed asylum seekers accommodated under section 4 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999 because they are temporarily unable to leave the United Kingdom. The card can be used at most of the main supermarket chains to purchase food and other essential items. The performance of the card is kept under regular review but the Government is satisfied that it is an effective way of ensuring that recipients are able to meet their essential living needs and are not left destitute.</p><p> </p><p>The Government therefore has no plans to abolish the card or change legislation to allow people supported under section 4 to receive cash instead.</p><p> </p><p>The total administrative costs of the card scheme since it was introduced in 2009 are approximately £1,515,000. Estimated administrative costs for the current financial year are £200,000.</p><p> </p><p>The Government published its response to the House of Commons Home Affairs Committee report about asylum procedures in December 2013 (cm 8769). A response to the Committee’s views on section 4 support was set out on page 18-19.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Bates more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
HL2277 more like this
HL2279 more like this
HL2280 more like this
HL2281 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-10-28T15:17:55.3415588Zmore like thismore than 2014-10-28T15:17:55.3415588Z
star this property answering member
1091
star this property label Biography information for Lord Bates more like this
star this property tabling member
3691
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Roberts of Llandudno more like this
100073
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-10-21more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering body
Home Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 1 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Home Office more like this
unstar this property answering dept sort name Home Office more like this
star this property hansard heading Asylum: Finance more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government how much they have spent on administering the Azure card system since its inception. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Roberts of Llandudno more like this
star this property uin HL2279 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2014-10-28more like thismore than 2014-10-28
star this property answer text <p>The Azure card is issued to destitute failed asylum seekers accommodated under section 4 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999 because they are temporarily unable to leave the United Kingdom. The card can be used at most of the main supermarket chains to purchase food and other essential items. The performance of the card is kept under regular review but the Government is satisfied that it is an effective way of ensuring that recipients are able to meet their essential living needs and are not left destitute.</p><p> </p><p>The Government therefore has no plans to abolish the card or change legislation to allow people supported under section 4 to receive cash instead.</p><p> </p><p>The total administrative costs of the card scheme since it was introduced in 2009 are approximately £1,515,000. Estimated administrative costs for the current financial year are £200,000.</p><p> </p><p>The Government published its response to the House of Commons Home Affairs Committee report about asylum procedures in December 2013 (cm 8769). A response to the Committee’s views on section 4 support was set out on page 18-19.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Bates more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
HL2277 more like this
HL2278 more like this
HL2280 more like this
HL2281 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-10-28T15:17:55.7481075Zmore like thismore than 2014-10-28T15:17:55.7481075Z
star this property answering member
1091
star this property label Biography information for Lord Bates more like this
star this property tabling member
3691
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Roberts of Llandudno more like this
100074
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-10-21more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering body
Home Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 1 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Home Office more like this
unstar this property answering dept sort name Home Office more like this
star this property hansard heading Asylum: Finance more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is their forecast annual cost for administering the Azure card payment scheme in the coming year. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Roberts of Llandudno more like this
star this property uin HL2280 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2014-10-28more like thismore than 2014-10-28
star this property answer text <p>The Azure card is issued to destitute failed asylum seekers accommodated under section 4 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999 because they are temporarily unable to leave the United Kingdom. The card can be used at most of the main supermarket chains to purchase food and other essential items. The performance of the card is kept under regular review but the Government is satisfied that it is an effective way of ensuring that recipients are able to meet their essential living needs and are not left destitute.</p><p> </p><p>The Government therefore has no plans to abolish the card or change legislation to allow people supported under section 4 to receive cash instead.</p><p> </p><p>The total administrative costs of the card scheme since it was introduced in 2009 are approximately £1,515,000. Estimated administrative costs for the current financial year are £200,000.</p><p> </p><p>The Government published its response to the House of Commons Home Affairs Committee report about asylum procedures in December 2013 (cm 8769). A response to the Committee’s views on section 4 support was set out on page 18-19.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Bates more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
HL2277 more like this
HL2278 more like this
HL2279 more like this
HL2281 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-10-28T15:17:56.0405779Zmore like thismore than 2014-10-28T15:17:56.0405779Z
star this property answering member
1091
star this property label Biography information for Lord Bates more like this
star this property tabling member
3691
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Roberts of Llandudno more like this
100075
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-10-21more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering body
Home Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 1 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Home Office more like this
unstar this property answering dept sort name Home Office more like this
star this property hansard heading Asylum: Finance more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is their response to the conclusion of the House of Commons Home Affairs Committee that "section 4 is not the solution for people who have been refused but cannot be returned" as stated in their report <i>Asylum</i> (7th Report of session 2013–14, HC 71). more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Roberts of Llandudno more like this
star this property uin HL2281 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2014-10-28more like thismore than 2014-10-28
star this property answer text <p>The Azure card is issued to destitute failed asylum seekers accommodated under section 4 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999 because they are temporarily unable to leave the United Kingdom. The card can be used at most of the main supermarket chains to purchase food and other essential items. The performance of the card is kept under regular review but the Government is satisfied that it is an effective way of ensuring that recipients are able to meet their essential living needs and are not left destitute.</p><p> </p><p>The Government therefore has no plans to abolish the card or change legislation to allow people supported under section 4 to receive cash instead.</p><p> </p><p>The total administrative costs of the card scheme since it was introduced in 2009 are approximately £1,515,000. Estimated administrative costs for the current financial year are £200,000.</p><p> </p><p>The Government published its response to the House of Commons Home Affairs Committee report about asylum procedures in December 2013 (cm 8769). A response to the Committee’s views on section 4 support was set out on page 18-19.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Bates more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
HL2277 more like this
HL2278 more like this
HL2279 more like this
HL2280 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-10-28T15:17:56.2935035Zmore like thismore than 2014-10-28T15:17:56.2935035Z
star this property answering member
1091
star this property label Biography information for Lord Bates more like this
star this property tabling member
3691
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Roberts of Llandudno more like this
100076
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-10-21more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering body
Home Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 1 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Home Office more like this
unstar this property answering dept sort name Home Office more like this
star this property hansard heading Free Movement of People: Republic of Ireland more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government what role the free movement of people between the United Kingdom and Ireland, however defined, plays in the Anglo-Irish agreement and in the documents which underpin it. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Mawhinney more like this
star this property uin HL2282 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2014-10-28more like thismore than 2014-10-28
star this property answer text <p>Free movement of people between the United Kingdom and Ireland within the Common Travel Area has existed since 1923 and therefore predates both the Anglo-Irish Agreement and the subsequent British-Irish Agreement. The free movement of people between the two jurisdictions is not provided for by either Agreement.</p><p> </p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Bates more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-10-28T15:18:32.4759546Zmore like thismore than 2014-10-28T15:18:32.4759546Z
star this property answering member
1091
star this property label Biography information for Lord Bates more like this
star this property tabling member
121
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Mawhinney more like this
1002218
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2018-11-05more like thismore than 2018-11-05
star this property answering body
Home Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 1 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Home Office more like this
unstar this property answering dept sort name Home Office more like this
star this property hansard heading Passports more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government whether an Irish citizen born in Ireland with an English mother is entitled to apply for a British passport. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Forsyth of Drumlean more like this
star this property uin HL11239 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2018-11-16more like thismore than 2018-11-16
star this property answer text <p>To apply for a British passport, a person must first hold a form of British nationality. Irish nationals born after 1949 can generally become British citizens if one of their parents held British citizenship at the time of their birth and was able to pass that status on. Mothers could only pass on British nationality from 1 January 1983.</p><p>Where they do not hold British nationality, Irish nationals with a British citizen parent are able to apply for naturalisation or registration as a British citizen provided they meet the statutory requirements.</p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Baroness Williams of Trafford more like this
star this property grouped question UIN HL11240 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2018-11-16T11:31:13.857Zmore like thismore than 2018-11-16T11:31:13.857Z
star this property answering member
4311
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Williams of Trafford more like this
star this property tabling member
1141
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Forsyth of Drumlean more like this
1002219
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2018-11-05more like thismore than 2018-11-05
star this property answering body
Home Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 1 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Home Office more like this
unstar this property answering dept sort name Home Office more like this
star this property hansard heading Passports more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government whether an Irish citizen born in Ireland with an English father is entitled to apply for a British passport. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Forsyth of Drumlean more like this
star this property uin HL11240 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2018-11-16more like thismore than 2018-11-16
star this property answer text <p>To apply for a British passport, a person must first hold a form of British nationality. Irish nationals born after 1949 can generally become British citizens if one of their parents held British citizenship at the time of their birth and was able to pass that status on. Mothers could only pass on British nationality from 1 January 1983.</p><p>Where they do not hold British nationality, Irish nationals with a British citizen parent are able to apply for naturalisation or registration as a British citizen provided they meet the statutory requirements.</p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Baroness Williams of Trafford more like this
star this property grouped question UIN HL11239 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2018-11-16T11:31:14.903Zmore like thismore than 2018-11-16T11:31:14.903Z
star this property answering member
4311
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Williams of Trafford more like this
star this property tabling member
1141
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Forsyth of Drumlean more like this
1002234
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2018-11-05more like thismore than 2018-11-05
star this property answering body
Home Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 1 remove filter
star this property answering dept short name Home Office more like this
unstar this property answering dept sort name Home Office more like this
star this property hansard heading Asylum: Expenditure more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government how much of the £3.6 million development fund for claims under the Dublin Regulation and for family reunion has so far been spent; and whether such expenditure has increased and accelerated the approval of cases. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Hylton more like this
star this property uin HL11255 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2018-11-16more like thismore than 2018-11-16
star this property answer text <p>Following the Sandhurst Treaty in January 2018, officials within the French and British Governments have been working collaboratively to understand how the Dublin Development Fund can be used most effectively. Under the terms of the Sandhurst Treaty, an Asylum Liaison Officer has been deployed in Paris to facilitate this cooperation.</p><p>We are confident that the agreed programme of work will improve access to the Dublin process and ensure comprehensive support and accurate information is provided to vulnerable migrants. We are in the process of transferring these funds and will continue to work with the French Government to implement this work.</p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Baroness Williams of Trafford more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2018-11-16T11:31:44.683Zmore like thismore than 2018-11-16T11:31:44.683Z
star this property answering member
4311
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Williams of Trafford more like this
star this property tabling member
2018
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Hylton more like this