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1124338
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-01more like thismore than 2019-05-01
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Prisoners: Hepatitis more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department is taking to support NHS England's plan to eliminate Hepatitis C in England by 2025, especially with regard to the prison service. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Worthing West more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Sir Peter Bottomley more like this
star this property uin 249814 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
unstar this property answer text <p>We recognise the unique opportunity that custody offers to identify and encourage individuals with Blood Borne Viruses (BBVs) to engage in treatment. NHS England are responsible for commissioning and delivering health services in prisons and Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) are responsible for enabling access to healthcare services for those in custody. We are fully supportive of the work being done by NHS England and Public Health England to meet the 2025 target for the elimination of Hepatitis C in England.</p><p> </p><p>An opt-out policy for BBV testing was introduced in 2013, under the previous National Partnership Agreement for Prison Healthcare in England (NPA) between NHS England (NHSE), Public Health England (PHE) and HMPPS (then NOMS). Full implementation of the opt-out testing policy for BBVs in all adult prisons in England was achieved in March 2018. Since opt-out testing was introduced, the uptake of BBV testing in prisons has increased from a baseline of 4% to 29%. This figure is an aggregate for all prisons, with some far exceeding the average uptake. This shared commitment to tackling the spread of infectious diseases, including Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C and HIV, in prisons was reaffirmed in the new NPA between NHSE, PHE, HMPPS, the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) and MoJ, published in April 2018.</p><p> </p><p>We continue to work with our health partners to identify points of attrition and barriers to testing uptake, as well as with organisations, such as the Hepatitis C Trust, to raise awareness among prison staff and prisoners about the importance of testing for BBV.</p><p> </p><p>We are currently reviewing the process by which defendants access essential medication whilst in the custody of the Prisoner Escort and Custody Services to ensure that it is fit for purpose and to consider further improvements. Additionally, current processes for Discharge Planning will be enhanced as a part of the Hepatitis C Pathways work being carried out by NHS England. This will ensure that individuals diagnosed with Hepatitis C who leave prison, transfer between prisons and attend court have their medication with them and have detailed instructions about accessing treatment specialists in the community. Treatment for Hepatitis C uses high value drugs, and ensuring that the full course follows the individual through the criminal justice system is a high priority for NHS England. Current processes will also be augmented by Hepatitis C Trust community peer workers engaging with people leaving prison, and through enhanced continuity of care arrangements under RECONNECT as outlined in the NHS Long Term Plan.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Charnwood more like this
star this property answering member printed Edward Argar more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
249815 more like this
249816 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-14T15:39:22.09Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-14T15:39:22.09Z
star this property answering member
4362
star this property label Biography information for Edward Argar more like this
star this property tabling member
117
unstar this property label Biography information for Sir Peter Bottomley more like this
1124339
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-01more like thismore than 2019-05-01
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Prisoners: Viral Diseases more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department is taking to address the variation in (a) practice and (b) uptake of opt-out testing for blood borne viruses such as hepatitis C and HIV in prisons. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Worthing West more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Sir Peter Bottomley more like this
star this property uin 249815 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
unstar this property answer text <p>We recognise the unique opportunity that custody offers to identify and encourage individuals with Blood Borne Viruses (BBVs) to engage in treatment. NHS England are responsible for commissioning and delivering health services in prisons and Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) are responsible for enabling access to healthcare services for those in custody. We are fully supportive of the work being done by NHS England and Public Health England to meet the 2025 target for the elimination of Hepatitis C in England.</p><p> </p><p>An opt-out policy for BBV testing was introduced in 2013, under the previous National Partnership Agreement for Prison Healthcare in England (NPA) between NHS England (NHSE), Public Health England (PHE) and HMPPS (then NOMS). Full implementation of the opt-out testing policy for BBVs in all adult prisons in England was achieved in March 2018. Since opt-out testing was introduced, the uptake of BBV testing in prisons has increased from a baseline of 4% to 29%. This figure is an aggregate for all prisons, with some far exceeding the average uptake. This shared commitment to tackling the spread of infectious diseases, including Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C and HIV, in prisons was reaffirmed in the new NPA between NHSE, PHE, HMPPS, the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) and MoJ, published in April 2018.</p><p> </p><p>We continue to work with our health partners to identify points of attrition and barriers to testing uptake, as well as with organisations, such as the Hepatitis C Trust, to raise awareness among prison staff and prisoners about the importance of testing for BBV.</p><p> </p><p>We are currently reviewing the process by which defendants access essential medication whilst in the custody of the Prisoner Escort and Custody Services to ensure that it is fit for purpose and to consider further improvements. Additionally, current processes for Discharge Planning will be enhanced as a part of the Hepatitis C Pathways work being carried out by NHS England. This will ensure that individuals diagnosed with Hepatitis C who leave prison, transfer between prisons and attend court have their medication with them and have detailed instructions about accessing treatment specialists in the community. Treatment for Hepatitis C uses high value drugs, and ensuring that the full course follows the individual through the criminal justice system is a high priority for NHS England. Current processes will also be augmented by Hepatitis C Trust community peer workers engaging with people leaving prison, and through enhanced continuity of care arrangements under RECONNECT as outlined in the NHS Long Term Plan.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Charnwood more like this
star this property answering member printed Edward Argar more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
249814 more like this
249816 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-14T15:39:22.15Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-14T15:39:22.15Z
star this property answering member
4362
star this property label Biography information for Edward Argar more like this
star this property tabling member
117
unstar this property label Biography information for Sir Peter Bottomley more like this
1124340
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-01more like thismore than 2019-05-01
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Prisoners: Hepatitis more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps the Government is taking to improve continuity and cooperation between the courts, prisons and probation services to ensure that offenders have their hepatitis C medication with them when transferred between different settings. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Worthing West more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Sir Peter Bottomley more like this
star this property uin 249816 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
unstar this property answer text <p>We recognise the unique opportunity that custody offers to identify and encourage individuals with Blood Borne Viruses (BBVs) to engage in treatment. NHS England are responsible for commissioning and delivering health services in prisons and Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) are responsible for enabling access to healthcare services for those in custody. We are fully supportive of the work being done by NHS England and Public Health England to meet the 2025 target for the elimination of Hepatitis C in England.</p><p> </p><p>An opt-out policy for BBV testing was introduced in 2013, under the previous National Partnership Agreement for Prison Healthcare in England (NPA) between NHS England (NHSE), Public Health England (PHE) and HMPPS (then NOMS). Full implementation of the opt-out testing policy for BBVs in all adult prisons in England was achieved in March 2018. Since opt-out testing was introduced, the uptake of BBV testing in prisons has increased from a baseline of 4% to 29%. This figure is an aggregate for all prisons, with some far exceeding the average uptake. This shared commitment to tackling the spread of infectious diseases, including Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C and HIV, in prisons was reaffirmed in the new NPA between NHSE, PHE, HMPPS, the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) and MoJ, published in April 2018.</p><p> </p><p>We continue to work with our health partners to identify points of attrition and barriers to testing uptake, as well as with organisations, such as the Hepatitis C Trust, to raise awareness among prison staff and prisoners about the importance of testing for BBV.</p><p> </p><p>We are currently reviewing the process by which defendants access essential medication whilst in the custody of the Prisoner Escort and Custody Services to ensure that it is fit for purpose and to consider further improvements. Additionally, current processes for Discharge Planning will be enhanced as a part of the Hepatitis C Pathways work being carried out by NHS England. This will ensure that individuals diagnosed with Hepatitis C who leave prison, transfer between prisons and attend court have their medication with them and have detailed instructions about accessing treatment specialists in the community. Treatment for Hepatitis C uses high value drugs, and ensuring that the full course follows the individual through the criminal justice system is a high priority for NHS England. Current processes will also be augmented by Hepatitis C Trust community peer workers engaging with people leaving prison, and through enhanced continuity of care arrangements under RECONNECT as outlined in the NHS Long Term Plan.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Charnwood more like this
star this property answering member printed Edward Argar more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
249814 more like this
249815 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-14T15:39:22.197Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-14T15:39:22.197Z
star this property answering member
4362
star this property label Biography information for Edward Argar more like this
star this property tabling member
117
unstar this property label Biography information for Sir Peter Bottomley more like this
1125702
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-09more like thismore than 2019-05-09
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Landlord and Tenant more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many notices were granted by the courts under Section 21 of the Housing Act 1988 in each year since 2010. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Wolverhampton North East more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Emma Reynolds more like this
star this property uin 252630 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
unstar this property answer text <p>The information requested could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Blackpool North and Cleveleys more like this
star this property answering member printed Paul Maynard more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-14T15:27:45.613Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-14T15:27:45.613Z
star this property answering member
3926
star this property label Biography information for Paul Maynard more like this
star this property tabling member
4077
unstar this property label Biography information for Emma Reynolds more like this
1125646
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-09more like thismore than 2019-05-09
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
star this property hansard heading UK Membership of EU more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the cost to the to the public purse in (a) gross and (b) net terms of the UK's extended membership of the EU to 31 October 2019; and what estimate he has made of the per diem cost of membership of the EU post 31 October 2019. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Witham more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Priti Patel more like this
star this property uin 252543 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
unstar this property answer text <p>The settlement agreed with the EU represents a comprehensive settlement covering all of the mutual commitments between the EU and the UK. The OBR’s latest estimate is laid as part of the wider OBR Economic and Fiscal Outlook publication. The most recent estimate, £37.8bn, was published in the March 2019 Economic and Fiscal Outlook. This analysis assumes an exit date of 29 March 2019</p><p> </p><p>The European Council has agreed an extension to Article 50 to the end of October. During the extension, the UK will continue to be a member of the European Union. While we remain in the EU we will uphold our commitments on the EU Budget, adjusted for the rebate. Similarly, the EU continues to have legal obligations to us as a member state, including in respect of receipts from the EU budget. We will provide an updated estimate of the value of the financial settlement once the UK has left the EU.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The UK makes two contributions per month to the EU Budget which will vary from month to month. These payments are made on the first working day and the first working day after the 19th of each month. As such, it would not be possible to calculate a daily cost of an extension to Article 50 to the end of October.</p>
star this property answering member constituency South West Norfolk more like this
star this property answering member printed Elizabeth Truss more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-14T13:24:45.44Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-14T13:24:45.44Z
star this property answering member
4097
star this property label Biography information for Elizabeth Truss more like this
star this property tabling member
4066
unstar this property label Biography information for Priti Patel more like this
1125647
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-09more like thismore than 2019-05-09
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Transport: Capital Investment more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what options are available to finance strategic transport infrastructure schemes. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Witham more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Priti Patel more like this
star this property uin 252544 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
unstar this property answer text <p>The Government directly finances strategic transport infrastructure through various funds. This includes Control Period 6 (which will invest almost £48bn in the railway network over the period 2019-2024) and the second Road Investment Strategy (which will invest £25.3bn in the strategic road network over the period 2020 - 2025).</p><p>The Chancellor announced at Budget 2018 that PFI and PF2 would no longer be used for new government projects, and the Treasury will not be seeking a like-for-like replacement for these models. The Treasury remains open to private finance for government-funded projects, and is consulting on this as part of the Infrastructure Finance Review, as announced in the Spring Statement.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency South West Norfolk more like this
star this property answering member printed Elizabeth Truss more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-14T13:27:14.523Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-14T13:27:14.523Z
star this property answering member
4097
star this property label Biography information for Elizabeth Truss more like this
star this property tabling member
4066
unstar this property label Biography information for Priti Patel more like this
1125713
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-09more like thismore than 2019-05-09
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
star this property hansard heading Children in Care more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment he has made of the (a) number of and (b) reasons for children being taken into care. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Westmorland and Lonsdale more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Tim Farron more like this
star this property uin 252568 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
unstar this property answer text <p>Information on the number of children who started to be looked after during the year by reason is published in Table C1 in the statistical release ‘Children Looked After in England including Adoption’ at: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/children-looked-after-in-england-including-adoption-2017-to-2018" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/children-looked-after-in-england-including-adoption-2017-to-2018</a>. Information for children taken into care is shown in the attached tabled.</p><p>The government wants every child to be in a stable, loving home that is right for them. One of the key principles of the legislation which underpins the UK’s child protection system, is that children are best looked after within their families. However, that is not always possible and, as a last resort, local authorities can apply to the courts for a care or supervision order where the child is suffering, or is at risk of suffering, significant harm. In making their decisions, the courts must be satisfied that the threshold for significant harm has been met and that taking the child from his or her family’s care will be in the child’s best interests.</p><p> </p><p>Where a child cannot live at home, we must make sure they are safe and receive the highest quality care, which is why we are working hard to improve the social care support for children across England through our reform programme, Putting Children First. We have also established the Children’s Social Care What Works Centre, whose initial research priority focuses on ‘what works in safely reducing the need for children to enter care’.</p><p> </p><p>In the Autumn Budget, my right hon. Friend, the Chancellor of the Exchequer announced an additional £410 million for adult and children’s social care in 2019-20. A further £84 million is also being invested over the next 5 years through the Strengthening Families, Protecting Children programme. This programme will support up to 20 local authorities with high or rising demand for children’s social care services to improve the support offered to vulnerable children and their families. Through this, we aim to enable more children to stay at home thriving in stable family environments, and safely reduce the number of children entering care.</p><p> </p><p>Across the government, we are also tackling the problems that cause children to be in need in the first place. This includes better supporting those with alcohol-dependent parents, the introduction of landmark legislation for those affected by domestic abuse, preventing young people being drawn into serious violence, and unprecedented investment in early years education and support for children and young people’s mental health.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Stratford-on-Avon more like this
star this property answering member printed Nadhim Zahawi more like this
star this property grouped question UIN 252574 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-14T15:46:32.12Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-14T15:46:32.12Z
star this property answering member
4113
star this property label Biography information for Nadhim Zahawi more like this
star this property attachment
1
star this property file name 252568_252574_Children_In_Care_Table.doc more like this
star this property title 252568_252574_Table more like this
star this property tabling member
1591
unstar this property label Biography information for Tim Farron more like this
1125743
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-09more like thismore than 2019-05-09
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
star this property hansard heading Children in Care more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he has taken to reduce the number of children being taken into care; and what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of measures implemented by his Department to support that aim. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Westmorland and Lonsdale more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Tim Farron more like this
star this property uin 252574 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
unstar this property answer text <p>Information on the number of children who started to be looked after during the year by reason is published in Table C1 in the statistical release ‘Children Looked After in England including Adoption’ at: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/children-looked-after-in-england-including-adoption-2017-to-2018" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/children-looked-after-in-england-including-adoption-2017-to-2018</a>. Information for children taken into care is shown in the attached tabled.</p><p>The government wants every child to be in a stable, loving home that is right for them. One of the key principles of the legislation which underpins the UK’s child protection system, is that children are best looked after within their families. However, that is not always possible and, as a last resort, local authorities can apply to the courts for a care or supervision order where the child is suffering, or is at risk of suffering, significant harm. In making their decisions, the courts must be satisfied that the threshold for significant harm has been met and that taking the child from his or her family’s care will be in the child’s best interests.</p><p> </p><p>Where a child cannot live at home, we must make sure they are safe and receive the highest quality care, which is why we are working hard to improve the social care support for children across England through our reform programme, Putting Children First. We have also established the Children’s Social Care What Works Centre, whose initial research priority focuses on ‘what works in safely reducing the need for children to enter care’.</p><p> </p><p>In the Autumn Budget, my right hon. Friend, the Chancellor of the Exchequer announced an additional £410 million for adult and children’s social care in 2019-20. A further £84 million is also being invested over the next 5 years through the Strengthening Families, Protecting Children programme. This programme will support up to 20 local authorities with high or rising demand for children’s social care services to improve the support offered to vulnerable children and their families. Through this, we aim to enable more children to stay at home thriving in stable family environments, and safely reduce the number of children entering care.</p><p> </p><p>Across the government, we are also tackling the problems that cause children to be in need in the first place. This includes better supporting those with alcohol-dependent parents, the introduction of landmark legislation for those affected by domestic abuse, preventing young people being drawn into serious violence, and unprecedented investment in early years education and support for children and young people’s mental health.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Stratford-on-Avon more like this
star this property answering member printed Nadhim Zahawi more like this
star this property grouped question UIN 252568 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-14T15:46:32.167Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-14T15:46:32.167Z
star this property answering member
4113
star this property label Biography information for Nadhim Zahawi more like this
star this property attachment
1
star this property file name 252568_252574_Children_In_Care_Table.doc more like this
star this property title 252568_252574_Table more like this
star this property tabling member
1591
unstar this property label Biography information for Tim Farron more like this
1124711
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-03more like thismore than 2019-05-03
star this property answering body
Ministry of Defence more like this
star this property answering dept id 11 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Defence more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Defence more like this
star this property hansard heading Armed Forces: Hexavalent Chromium more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many armed forces personnel are trained in the application of paints containing Hexavalent Chromium; and on how many occasions such paint was applied to military vehicles and vessels in each year since 2013. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency West Dunbartonshire more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Martin Docherty-Hughes more like this
star this property uin 250782 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
unstar this property answer text <p>The Ministry of Defence (MOD) does not have ready access to the information you have requested as it is not centrally recorded. Hexavalent chromium paint is now only used by the MOD on platforms where there is no suitable alternative and where it is absolutely necessary to maintain defence capability and safety. The MOD is alert to the health and safety risks associated with hexavalent chromate and provides guidance, safety data sheets, training and working instructions for personnel known to be working with the substance, together with personal protective equipment. The MOD has a small number of exemptions in place for known instances of hexavalent chromate application and is working hard to identify alternatives in these cases.</p><p> </p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Pudsey more like this
star this property answering member printed Stuart Andrew more like this
star this property grouped question UIN 250783 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-14T15:16:16.797Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-14T15:16:16.797Z
star this property answering member
4032
star this property label Biography information for Stuart Andrew more like this
star this property tabling member
4374
unstar this property label Biography information for Martin Docherty-Hughes more like this
1124712
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-05-03more like thismore than 2019-05-03
star this property answering body
Ministry of Defence more like this
star this property answering dept id 11 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Defence more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Defence more like this
star this property hansard heading Armed Forces: Hexavalent Chromium more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate his Department has made of the number of (a) current and (b) former serving armed forces personnel that may have been exposed to paint containing Hexavalent Chromium. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency West Dunbartonshire more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Martin Docherty-Hughes more like this
star this property uin 250783 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer remove filter
unstar this property answer text <p>The Ministry of Defence (MOD) does not have ready access to the information you have requested as it is not centrally recorded. Hexavalent chromium paint is now only used by the MOD on platforms where there is no suitable alternative and where it is absolutely necessary to maintain defence capability and safety. The MOD is alert to the health and safety risks associated with hexavalent chromate and provides guidance, safety data sheets, training and working instructions for personnel known to be working with the substance, together with personal protective equipment. The MOD has a small number of exemptions in place for known instances of hexavalent chromate application and is working hard to identify alternatives in these cases.</p><p> </p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Pudsey more like this
star this property answering member printed Stuart Andrew more like this
star this property grouped question UIN 250782 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-05-14T15:16:16.843Zmore like thismore than 2019-05-14T15:16:16.843Z
star this property answering member
4032
star this property label Biography information for Stuart Andrew more like this
star this property tabling member
4374
unstar this property label Biography information for Martin Docherty-Hughes more like this